Japan: Samurai Helmet Coin Craft

In researching for this post, we were surprised by the fact that this Japanese Samurai Helmet made of 5-yen coins is actually a popular craft. Here’s a quote from one story we read about a Tokyo grade-schooler back in the 1980s who created an entire suit of armor:

A photo of an entire suit of Samurai armor created in coin craft by a gradeschool student in Tokyo in the 1980s. From Japan Today magazine
an entire suit of Samurai armor in coin craft

@take14aki estimates that the armor and helmet required somewhere around 1,750 coins to put together,
which works out to 8,750 yen in legal tender.

from JAPAN TODAY

It’s interesting to learn that there are quite a few pieces of Samurai armor created with Japanese coins and tokens. Want to view more? Do a search for <Samurai Coin Helmets> and see for yourself.

Details of the Japanese Samurai coin craft helmet in our shop at Bahoukas Antiques.
Detail of our amazing handcrafted Samurai Helmet made of coins
Photo of Samurai Helmets made from legos from the Lego Ideas site.

LEGO IDEAS

While researching, we also found this interesting Samurai project from the Lego Ideas site! Who would have thought!

Just like we tell you all the time, we are most definitely a “Collection of Collections.” Some are very unique items as you can tell from our beautiful Samurai Coin Crafted Helmet. We hope you’ll stop in and give it a look! It’s quite an amazing piece and in great shape! (Of course, we wouldn’t want to wear something like this in battle!!!)

Yep, we’re watchin’ for ya! See you soon.

US Navy Cutlass – Knights Templar Sword

These two antique pieces arrived recently. We’re excited to share them with you.

Civil War Naval Cutlass

First, let’s share a little background regarding this Naval Cutlass:

First cousin to the longer, lighter cavalry saber, the naval cutlass was designed for sea-fighting as the saber was adapted to land-battles. Because boarding actions were fought on the crowded decks of small vessels amid tangles of shrouds and splintered spars and struggling shipmates and foemen, Jack Tar’s blade had to be short for easy control, and heavy enough to provide its own momentum in slashing. (Unlike the cavalry trooper’s trusty saber, Jack’s cutlass did not have the weight of a galloping horse behind it!) The cutlass had a straight or slightly-curved blade designed both for cutting and thrusting. A large, enclosed guard shielded the swordsman’s hand.

from website History.naval.mil

Are you wondering just who “Jack Tar” might be? Here’s a bit of info:

Jack Tar (also JacktarJack-tar or Tar) is a common English term originally used to refer to seamen of the Merchant or Royal Navy, particularly during the period of the British Empire. By World War I the term was used as a nickname for those in the U.S. Navy. Members of the public and seafarers alike made use of the name in identifying those who went to sea. It was not used as a pejorative and sailors were happy to use the term to label themselves.

from Wikipedia
US Naval Cutlass (Civil War) and early 1900s Ceremonial Sword of Knights Templar
US Naval Cutlass on left – Ceremonial Sword of Knights Templar on right

There’s an interesting link from this cutlass to Havre de Grace via Commodore John Rodgers.

In 1808, Commodore John Rodgers of the Brooklyn Navy Yard awarded Nathan Starr a contract for 2,000 cutlasses at $2.50 each. This weapon was 35 ¼ inches long with a single-edged, straight blade. The guard was made of iron, beaten to concavity and lacquered black. The grip was a maple cylinder protected from splitting by two metal rings (ferrules) clamped around the handle near its upper and lower ends. In the hands of New England seamen, these cutlasses felled scores of Britons during bloody boarding actions in the War of 1812, including the capture by HMS Shannonof James Lawrence’s Chesapeake in 1813, and Wasp‘s victory over HMS Reindeer in 1814, one of the fiercest cutlass-fights in the annals of the sea.

from History.Naval.Mil

Rodgers Tavern (where Abbey’s Burger will open later this month) is connected to the Rodgers Family and their history with Havre de Grace. Here’s a tribute to Commodore Rodgers from Missouri Senator Thomas Hart Benton:

When I first saw Commodore Rodgers, which was after I had reached senatorial age and station, he recalled to me the idea of those modern admirals, and subsequent acquaintance confirmed the impression then made.

He was to me the complete impersonation of my idea of the perfect naval commander; person, mind and manners with the qualities of command grafted on the groundwork of a good citizen and good father of a family and all lodged in a frame to bespeak the seaman and officer. His very figure and face were those of the naval hero such as we conceive from naval songs and ballads and from the course of life which the sea officer leads exposed to the double peril of waves and war, contending with the storms of the elements as well as with the storm of battle. We associate the idea of bodily power with such a life, and when we find them united the heroic qualities in a frame of powerful muscular development, we experience a grateful feeling of completeness which fulfils a natural expectation and leaves nothing to be desired.

from War of 1812 Archaeology

Now you can see how easily you can get pulled into learning a bit of history while at the same time having fun!

Knights Templar Ceremonial Sword

There is a great deal of folklore and conspiracy theory when you speak of the Knights Templar of the Middle Ages. For an interesting read, consider this article10 Thinks You Never Knew About The Knights Templar by Dan Jones in the British Edition of GQ Magazine.

The sword with its scabbard is probably early 1900s. George is still researching it.

Here’s another photos of these two awesome antique pieces:

U.S. Naval Cutlass - Civil War period and Ceremonial Sword of Knights Templar.

We look forward to having you drop by and view these two pieces of history. Remember, George is the “Collector of Collections.” We’ll be watchin’ for ya to stop by so we can help you find your favorites!

Military DUI, Patches, and more

Bahoukas Antique Mall & Beer MuZeum has a military collection worth browsing. This recent collection includes a variety of DUI – Distinctive Unit Insignias including many from WWII, a Coast Guard Cap, Awards Ribbons, A Unit Patch (we have many more), a Cap Badge, and a Spec 5 Patch.

WWII Distinctive Unit Insignia
WWII Distinctive Unit Insignia
WWII Distinctive Unit Insignia
WWII Distinctive Unit Insignia

distinctive unit insignia (DUI) is a metal heraldic device worn by soldiers in the United States Army. The DUI design is derived from the coat of arms authorized for a unit. DUIs may also be called “distinctive insignia” (DI), a “crest” or a “unit crest” by soldiers or collectors. The term “crest” however, in addition to being incorrect, may be misleading, as a DUI is an insignia in its own right rather than a heraldic crest. The term “crest” properly refers to the portion of an achievement of arms which stands atop the helmet over the shield of arms. (Nevertheless, a minority of DUIs happen to depict crests, such as those of many National Guard state area commands.) The U.S. Army Institute of Heraldry is responsible for the design, development and authorization of all DUIs.

From Military Wikia
WWII Distinctive Unit Insignia
WWII Distinctive Unit Insignia
WWII Distinctive Unit Insignia
WWII Distinctive Unit Insignia
Unit Patch - blue star on white with red border - we have many more here at Bahoukas
Unit Patch – we have many more
Spec 5 Rank Patch
Spec 5 Rank Patch

Here’s a link to our Military Posts.

MILITARY LINK – Some of these items may no longer be available, but you’ll get a pretty good idea of the variety of Military Collectibles that we have. And we’re always receiving more.

Stop in over Havre de Grace’s Independence Weekend Celebrations and browse the shop. We’ll be watchin’ for ya. And just so you don’t miss out on anything, here’s the schedule of events!

Havre de Grace July 4 Weekend Events

Harper’s Pictorial History – Civil War

The latest addition to our Military and Civil War Antiques and Collectibles are about 20 issues of Harper’s Weekly Magazine from the 1860s.

Harper’s Weekly was the most widely read journal in the United States throughout the period of the Civil War. So as not to upset its wide readership in the South, Harper’s took a moderate editorial position on the issue of slavery prior to the outbreak of the war. Publications that supported abolition referred to it as “Harper’s Weakly”. The Weekly had supported the Stephen A. Douglas presidential campaign against Abraham Lincoln, but as the American Civil War broke out, it fully supported Lincoln and the Union. A July 1863 article on the escaped slave Gordon included a photograph of his back, severely scarred from whippings; this provided many readers in the North their first visual evidence of the brutality of slavery. The photograph inspired many free blacks in the North to enlist.

Some of the most important articles and illustrations of the time were Harper’s reporting on the war. Besides renderings by Homer and Nast, the magazine also published illustrations by Theodore R. Davis, Henry Mosler, and the brothers Alfred and William Waud.

from Wikipedia

Political Cartoonist: Thomas Nast

Thomas Nast, legendary for his political cartoons in Harper’s, also cemented our present image of Santa Claus.
CLICK HERE for his story. It’s a most interesting read.

Thomas Nast cemented our present-day image of Santa Claus

Remember, Sunday is Father’s Day – June 20, 2021

From antiques and collectibles, games and videos, to our amazing Beer MuZeum, there’s sure to be the perfect gift waiting for you to discover! We’re here … and we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Collectible Invalid Feeders

Does you Dad collect military items?

Or maybe you just like to have unique items, we call ‘conversation pieces,’ on your table or shelf. The Red Cross invalid feeder is from WWI.

… an “invalid feeder” which was often found in many homes late in the 19th into the 20th century. They were used to facilitate the feeding of invalids. A liquid or semi-soft food was placed in the feeder and the spout was then placed in the person’s mouth. In the movie “The English Patient” the use of a feeder was shown in a brief flashback.

from AAHN website

Also known as Pap Boats, Invalid Feeders were used throughout the 19th century and well into the 20th century to aid in the feeding of patients that were too weak to feed themselves and in feeding infants. The use of invalid and infant feeders was much more popular in Europe than in the United States. A mixture called Pap, consisting of flour, bread, and water was mixed together to creat a gruel that was fed to the patient. Typically, the feeders were made of ceramic and colorfully decorated, with some shaped like animals for feeding children. Some early Invalid Feeders were made out of sterling silver or clear glass.

from Edward Hand Medical Museum

Next time you’re watching a movie from Victorian Era through WWI, keep an eye out for a nurse using an invalid feeder. It adds a little fun to your movie night.

Bahoukas received a beautiful collection of invalid feeders. Some are very plain, others are quite exquisite. One or two of them look like they were especially made for children.

Stop in and take a peek. Yep, we’ll be watching for ya!

We’re back – Memorial Day – Unique Trading Cards

TOPPS non-sports collector trading cards - WINGS from the 1950s
WINGS – a series from TOPPS non-sports collector trading cards

We’re excited to once again add posts to our website!

We’ve updated regularly on our FB page, but we’ve ignored our website. We hope you’ll enjoy our new posts and visit our store. We’re located in a wonderful community that not only managed to survive, but actually thrive this past year. We are grateful! Masks are not required at this time, but if you wish to wear one you are most welcome.

TOPPS WINGS Series Trading Cards

The Topps Company, Inc. is an American company that manufactures chewing gum, candy, and collectibles. Based in New York City, Topps is best known as a leading producer of American football, baseball, basketball, ice hockey, soccer, and other sports and non-sports themed trading cards.

It is currently the only baseball card manufacturer with a contract with Major League Baseball. Topps also produces cards under the brand names Allen & Ginter and Bowman.

from Wikipedia

The following is from the Skytamer website:

“Wings” was the second Giant Size set issued by Topps, right in the midst of the 1952 Baseball cards retail blitz. Hugely popular, the set’s 200 cards feature a sweeping array of aircraft, mostly planes, displayed in colorful, if slightly muted tones. The fronts feature the aircraft’s name in a large font together with some military affiliation information in a black text box below. Reverses feature a large card number, a block of text, some statistics about the craft presented in a fashion similar to the stats on the 1952 baseball cards and a feature called “Friend or Foe”, which displayed silhouettes of planes and played on the fact the nation was still at war. The backs also have the usual T.C.G. copyright, a 1952 date and a “Courtesy Herald Tribune, Inc.” credit line, presumably for the text.

The Modern Hobby Guide to Topps Chewing Gum: 1938 to 1956 by David Hornish. 
Sample of our wonderful collection of TOPPS WINGS Trading Cards - HO 4S - 1 U.S. Navy Helicopter
back side of TOPPS WINGS series card #64  HO 4S - 1 U.S. Navy Helicopter

Memorial Day weekend seems the perfect time to highlight these latest collections that arrived in our shop. May we remember the sacrifice our Veterans made and honor them.

Bowman’s U.S. Naval Victories Trading Cards

The Bowman Gum Company was a Philadelphia-based manufacturer of bubble gum and trading cards in the period surrounding World War II. It was founded by Jacob Warren Bowman in 1927.

Bowman produced a line of baseball cards, which were highly popular in the 1940s. Bowman also produced American football and basketball cards. The company was acquired by Topps in 1956, and the brand was discontinued.

Topps resurrected the “Bowman” brand in 1989.

from Wikipedia
Bowman's U.S. Navy Victories Trading Cards from the 1950s.

Bowman’s 1954 U.S. Naval Victories card set consists of 48 cards. Issued against the real-life backdrop of the Cold War, each card evokes a sense of patriotism by displaying an American battle at sea from the beginning of the nation’s history to the early 1950s. The front of each card features only a colorfully drawn battle scene within a small white frame. Card backs (printed in blue ink) identify the set title, card title, card number, a brief description of the scene, and a quiz on “Do you know your Navy’s insignia?” 

from PSACard

Please enjoy a wonderful Memorial Day Weekend. Be sure to take some time to honor the Veterans who gave the ultimate sacrifice. Be safe in all ways. And be sure to stop by BAHOUKAS ANTIQUES AND BEER MUZEUM in Havre de Grace, MD. We’ll be waiting to say, “Welcome!”

Wednesday Surprise Box #7

Patches – no, not for holes …

Our Wednesday Surprise Box is really a rolling cart of drawers filled with a variety of patches.

Yes, we have patches … and more patches…

George has a huge selection of Boy Scout patches – all new. Plus a wonderful selection of military patches and a few miscellaneous. Love looking for just the perfect couple of patches? Well, stop by and see what we have in our Wednesday Surprise! Yep, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

German “Tinnies”

and Army Medals

Pre-WWII German “Tinnies”

According to Wikipedia, we have the following explanation of a German “Tinnie:”


“Tinnie” is the common term for a commemorative medal made from a non-precious metal such as zinc or tin (or even plastic) and with provisions for being attached to a garment and displayed while worn. Such medals were commonly sold or given away at public events to build group cohesiveness or to lend prestige to the wearer. The “golden age of the tinnie” was World War Two, and the Nazi Party and the USSR were among the most prolific disbursers of them. They are avidly collected today by hobbyists and, although usually inexpensive to obtain, are often collected in conjunction with coins, exonumiamilitary awards and decorations and other related small stamped or cast metal objects.

U.S. Army Medals

A wonderful way to learn about history is to collect U.S. Military Memorabilia. We have a section just for you! Included are these U.S. Army Medals.

We look forward to showing you this area. And yes, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Salute to Our Military

Please Take A Moment

Poppy - Lest We Forget - Memorial Day - Bahoukas Antiques

Yes, it’s a long weekend and there’s sun in the forecast. But it’s also a Holiday set aside for us to remember those of our military who have made the ultimate sacrifice. We encourage you to take a moment to sit quietly, remember and honor those courageous men and women. Shake a hand, share a hug, or just say “Thank You” to a family member or friend who is honoring the loss of a military loved one on this special day.

For those who love anything ‘military,’ here at Bahoukas Antique Mall, we have some interesting collectibles.

Books to Belt Buckles and other military collectibles at Bahoukas in Havre de Grace

Books, insignia, belts, manuals and more are available in our Military Collectibles. Stop in and see if there’s a special item you’d like to add to your own collection.

Military books and more at Bahoukas Antique Mall

Just looking for an interesting item to add to a table or bookshelf in honor of our Military? Check this out! A stand of flags or the flag and AMERICA sign – either would look great on a picnic table!

Flags, AMERICA sign, and more Military items at Bahoukas in Havre de Grace

Of course, as you enjoy your weekend in Havre de Grace, stop by and browse Bahoukas Antique Mall and Beer MuZeum. Absolutely, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Beautiful Noritake Rosamor Dishes

Gray Roses, Platinum, Gray and Black Leaves

Noritake Rosamor serving pieces at Bahoukas

Noritake began selling dinnerware in the US marketplace in 1904. We have sold our products through numerous department stores, jewelry stores and specialty stores from coast to coast. In addition to our over 100 years of selling fine quality china and porcelain within the United States, we have also served US military personnel around the globe.  __from Noritake site

Noritake Rosamor sugar and creamer

Noritake has been a fixture in American military bases for years and many servicemen have delighted their families sending home beautifully crafted sets of fine china.   __from Noritake site

Plates and bowls of Noritake Rosamor pattern at Bahoukas in Havre de Grace

The Noritake Rosamor pattern (5851) was very popular at US military PX facilities in Japan during the Vietnam War in the sixties and seventies. The china was sold in pre-packaged sets at attractive prices. __from Answers.Yahoo.com

Check out the deal George has on this Noritake Rosamor china set at BahoukasThis set of 95 pieces is stunning. It’s simple yet modern pattern is as beautiful today as when it was first made. Stop in and see it for yourself. Here’s our pricing. Chat with George. And yes, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

How Do You Carry Cash?

Money Clip? Money Belt?

Money Cclip, Army Money Belt, 200 year old money leather money belt

The money clip is an optional fashion accessory for the male wearer. It keeps paper money sorted and prevents it from being rumpled-looking in the pants pocket. There is a modicum of style attached to the use of this kind of clip. After all, if you are going out for a night on the town, it would not do to pay club cover charges with badly folded and crumpled up dollar bills. It is far more impressive to pull out a wad of neatly folded cash and hand the doorman the right change in the blink of an eye.
It is fair to say that the history of the money clip is directly tied to the history of non-coin currency.   … Peter Suchy Jewelers blog 
It was interesting to learn that Invented during China’s Han Dynasty in 118 BCE, original lightweight bank notes were made of leather. (from above post)
… an early precursor to the money clip is the drafts organizer of ancient Mesopotamia. Although it would be accurate to say that this clip is more closely related in function to a paper clip, it does factor into the money clip’s history by virtue of the items it secured. Back in 323 BCE, a clip would be used to hold notes detailing the storage of grain. The clips prevented loss of papers and helped with the easy distribution of the notes. A similar clip was used in Japan until about 300 CE for notes detailing rice storage.    … Peter Suchy Jewelers blog 
Interestingly, because most money clips are metallic, they are not necessarily as good a deal for travelers today. But …
… Although rare, carbon fiber money clips are starting to see market acceptance. Using advanced moulding techniques, the high strength and durability of carbon fiber make for ideal qualities. The carbon fiber allows the clamping surfaces to open beyond parallel, without the deformation of normal metal money clips. Also, being non-metallic they are ‘scanner proof’ which allows the user to pass through metal detectors without having to remove cash and credit cards.   from Wikipedia
Many guys will recognize the U.S. Army Money Belt which makes it easier and safer to carry money, important papers, etc. Money belts are described in Wikipedia:

Money belts are belts with secret compartments often worn by tourists as a precaution against theft. One form of money belt is a belt with a pouch attached to the front which is worn under a shirt to protect valuables from thieves and/or pickpockets.

Another form appears to be an ordinary belt when worn, but contains one or more hidden pockets on the inside, often closed with a zipper. Money belts are often worn by tourists as a precaution against theft.

Items typically placed in a money belt generally include such things as a passport, travel tickets, driver’s license, credit cards, cash, and jewelry. A significant problem is that scammers, pickpockets, beggars, and the like, know that the presence of a money belt brings a high likelihood of the bearer being a tourist, and therefore a high-value target, bringing more attention upon the wearer than desirable.   from Wikipedia

The most amazing money belt in our shop at Bahoukas Antiques is this 200 years old leather belt shown in the photo. It was from around 1800-1820 and was used by the lady’s great grandfather as he traveled west in a wagon train! WOW!

As you see, we have truly unique items in our store. We look forward to your next visit!

Military Hats – WWI to present day

Do You Remember Wearing Any of These?

military hats - l to r - Kevlar, Army, Navy visor caps, WWI cap

There are those who collect military apparel. But there are those who will have stories to share when they see one of these. Which one might you be?

We have an array of military items that you might want to peruse. But here we have, left to right, a modern Kevlar helmet, an Army visor cap (middle bottom), a Navy visor cap (middle top), and a WWI helmet. Did you ever wonder how Kevlar is so strong and protective. Click on this link to learn “How Kevlar Works.”

Stop in and see this as well as many more very collectible pieces. CLICK THIS LINK to view a great 250 year history of American Army Uniforms from the Business Insider website.