Model Plane Kits and more

In the last few months, we’ve acquired several interesting collections. Last week, we shared a few of our motorcycle memorabilia. This week we want to showcase a wonderful assortment of model airplane kits and an interesting magazine.

An assortment of model airplane kits in great condition

These kits include a large percentage of military aircraft. They are from the 1960s and the kits are in great condition.

Did You Know?

Though toy planes might seem like a byproduct of human flight, toys were actually airborne long before we were. In the late 1700s, Sir George Cayley built the first flying top using feathers, cork, and whalebone; by the middle of the following century, a helicopter device launched using a pull-string, called the “Spiralifère,” was a major hit in France. As inventors worked to develop life-size flying machines, they often tested their ideas on a smaller scale, leading to a variety of “mechanical birds” and other plane-like toys during the late 19th century.

from: Collectors Weekly

Unique Magazine Series: Royal Air Force Flying Review

We have a great selection of Flying Review Magazines from the 1960s.

First issue published in 1944 under the title ‘Royal Air Force Review’, but renamed ‘Royal Air Force Flying Review’ by the early 1950’s. Content at this time was a mixture of “ripping yarns” true flying stories and serious features on World War Two and contemporary aircraft types. Through the 1950’s it evolved into a serious enthusiasts magazine, with detailed type profiles, surveys of foreign air forces and assessments of the latest Soviet aircraft. It was renamed ‘Flying Review International’ in September 1963. With its large b+w and colour photos, cutaway drawings and colour profile drawings it became the premier aviation magazine in the UK.

from Aeriflight.co.uk

Evidently, in 1968 it was reformatted and the name changed. By 1970, it was no longer being published. This magazine had very enthusiastic readers.

So whether you want to check out this unique magazine selection or purchase a model plane – or two or three, we’re here and we’re watchin’ for ya. Stop in and we’ll point you to their shelf!

Harper’s Pictorial History – Civil War

The latest addition to our Military and Civil War Antiques and Collectibles are about 20 issues of Harper’s Weekly Magazine from the 1860s.

Harper’s Weekly was the most widely read journal in the United States throughout the period of the Civil War. So as not to upset its wide readership in the South, Harper’s took a moderate editorial position on the issue of slavery prior to the outbreak of the war. Publications that supported abolition referred to it as “Harper’s Weakly”. The Weekly had supported the Stephen A. Douglas presidential campaign against Abraham Lincoln, but as the American Civil War broke out, it fully supported Lincoln and the Union. A July 1863 article on the escaped slave Gordon included a photograph of his back, severely scarred from whippings; this provided many readers in the North their first visual evidence of the brutality of slavery. The photograph inspired many free blacks in the North to enlist.

Some of the most important articles and illustrations of the time were Harper’s reporting on the war. Besides renderings by Homer and Nast, the magazine also published illustrations by Theodore R. Davis, Henry Mosler, and the brothers Alfred and William Waud.

from Wikipedia

Political Cartoonist: Thomas Nast

Thomas Nast, legendary for his political cartoons in Harper’s, also cemented our present image of Santa Claus.
CLICK HERE for his story. It’s a most interesting read.

Thomas Nast cemented our present-day image of Santa Claus

Remember, Sunday is Father’s Day – June 20, 2021

From antiques and collectibles, games and videos, to our amazing Beer MuZeum, there’s sure to be the perfect gift waiting for you to discover! We’re here … and we’ll be watchin’ for ya!