Ice for Your Icebox!

The tools pictured are ice tongs and ice saw used to cut blocks of ice from the Susquehanna River when it froze thick enough – ideally 8″ thick! It was hard work. The blocks of ice at 8″ thick would average 2.67 cubic feet and weigh about 150 lbs (considered manageable weight)! This info is included in the book: Heavy Industries of Yesteryear, Harford County’s Rural Heritage, by Jack L. Shagena, Jr. and Henry C. Peden, Jr. (available in our store).

book cover for Heavy Industries of Yesteryear, Harford County's Rural Heritage
Excerpt about ice-harvesting from the book, Heavy Industries of Yesteryear, Harford County's Rural Heritage

Why did we need ice blocks?

1920s icebox

Into the 1930s, households used large blocks of ice to keep food cold in “iceboxes.”

This photo is from the 1920s. Courtesy of the Sloane Collection.

By the end of the 1800s, many American households stored their perishable food in an insulated “icebox” that was usually made of wood and lined with tin or zinc. A large block of ice was stored inside to keep these early refrigerators chilly. By this point, cold had become the clear choice among food preservation methods, proving less labor-intensive and more effective at preventing spoilage. Other techniques, like salting, drying, and canning, erased any appearance of freshness and required more time to prepare. Iceboxes also presented a new way to save prepared foods—or leftovers—that previously might not have lasted beyond one meal.

from AmericanHistory.si.edu

Abbott Bros Ice House

Photo of Abbott Bros Ice House

The above photo is of Abbott Bros Ice House, located where the Havre de Grace Marine Center is on Water Street in Havre de Grace.

For the local history lover on your holiday gift list, at least one of the items featured, the book, and the Abbott Bros Ice House photo (available at Bahoukas) would make an awesome addition to their collection. Talk to George today.

In the meantime, hurry in to find YOUR favorite items for someone on your gift list. And yes, we’re definitely watchin’ for ya!

New Collection of HdG Milk Bottles

Do You Remember a Milkman?

Many have fond memories of their milkman delivering local milk in bottles. Some even remember having an insulated box that sat outside the door for the milkman to place your bottles.

Wonderful Local Collection

Bahoukas has acquired an extensive local collection of Havre de Grace milk bottles. Besides George’s personal collection, we have plenty to share.

Dairies often embossed their name, logo, or initials onto the base of their milk bottles. This made it easy to identify their bottles at stores and bottle exchanges. Since milk bottles were used over and over again, it was important for a dairy to get their milk bottles back after use. The more times a milk bottle was used, the more profit for the dairy.

from Dr. Lori

Quarts-Pints-Half Pints

There are so many delightful ways to use these bottles besides just having them in a collection, sitting on a shelf.

Fill with colored water and place on a window sill. Better yet, add some fresh flowers.

Maybe you have a collection – like different colored sands or buttons – that would look lovely kept in these bottles.

Don’t forget the rest of our milk bottle collection!

We have an extensive collection of milk bottles. Here’s a pic:

scores of collectible milk bottles at Bahoukas Antique Mall in Havre de Grace
Huge collection of milk bottles at Bahoukas Antiques

Don’t forget that these would make interesting flower or candle holders for a wedding or other special events. Stop in and look over this collection. You know, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Speaking of Books…

Bob Lackey is no stranger to Havre de Grace, having lived here for 23 years. He shares in his bio:

Robert Lackey is a native of Havre de Grace, Maryland, by way of Leonardtown, Maryland, and Mt. Airy, North Carolina, plus thirty-five other brief addresses in the U.S. and Europe. Robert has been a writer, soldier, photographer, and administrator, but always comes back to his writing.

He briefly explains on his website that he shares Havre de Grace’s history through the characters of Ben and Sonja Pulaski.

Maryland is a slave state, bordering the free state of Pennsylvania. The line between them is the Mason-Dixon line. Both Ben and Sonja grew up around that “peculiar institution” of slavery.  The Pulaski Saga follows them, as they awaken to the moral issues of slavery and are drawn into individual acts that become a commitment to helping runaway slaves escape to the north. 

from Robert Lackey’s Website

A “History Junkie…

with a vivid imagination,” Robert F. Lackey shares a bit of his journey with the Pulaski Saga in this interview with Barbara Evers. It can be found on her website.

Robert (Bob) Lackey keeps the adventure rolling in each of his 10-part series while giving us a great deal of Havre de Grace history in a most enjoyable way. Stop in soon and look over the series. A great idea for a gift for anyone who enjoys adventure and history – especially if they’ve been to Havre de Grace, MD.

Stop in soon. We’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Crabs and Oysters

The blue crab is a highly sought-after shellfish. Blue crabs live up and down the Atlantic Coast and in the Gulf of Mexico and are caught by both commercial and recreational fishermen. Its scientific name—Callinectes sapidus—translated from Latin means ‘beautiful savory swimmer.’

Blue crabs are the most valuable fishery in the Chesapeake Bay. They are also major predators of benthic communities and are prey for many other fish species. Blue crabs are so treasured in the region that the blue crab is the Maryland state crustacean.

from Fisheries.noaa.gov
beautiful blue crab of the Chesapeake
beautiful blue crab

New to Eating Crabs?

Let us help you out!

Do you know what BABY OYSTERS are called?

SPAT! That’s right. Here’s a fun article: 10 Things You Didn’t Know About Chesapeake Oysters.

Have you ever wondered if eating oysters is really healthy? Check out this article:

“Yes, oysters are very good for you,” according to preventive cardiology dietitian Julia Zumpano, RD, LD. 

“In fact, you probably didn’t know that it’s hard to beat all the health benefits of oysters from a nutritional standpoint,” she says.

from ClevelandClinic.org
Oysters from the Chesapeake - YUM
Image by StockSnap from Pixabay

New to Oysters? Watch this:

Along with a few crab mallets, we also have these beautiful oyster knives.

wooden handled oyster knives at Bahoukas
Oyster Knives

Finally – Maryland Skipjacks

Skipjacks in the Chesapeake and oyster drudgin’ are as much a part of Maryland culture as duck hunting and decoys. We couldn’t talk about crabs and oysters without a bit about skipjacks. And don’t forget to visit the Havre de Grace Decoy Museum and Havre de Grace Maritime Museum for local history.

SKIPJACKS

The Maryland State Boat has a colorful history. And you might find some items in our shop at Bahoukas to add to your Maryland collection.

The skipjack became the State Boat in 1985 (Chapter 788, Acts of 1985; Code General Provisions Article, sec. 7-327).At that time, the General Assembly noted that: “. . . Recent efforts to restore the environmental integrity of the Chesapeake Bay have rekindled interest and appreciation in the majestic estuary as not only an economic asset but also as the foundation for a way of life for many Marylanders; and . . . Nothing better represents the way of life of Maryland watermen than the historic Chesapeake Boat known as the Skipjack . . .”

Skipjack under sail on Chesapeake Bay. Photo by Marion E. Warren (Marion E. Warren Collection, MSA SC1890-BP7506, Maryland State Archives).

from MSA.Maryland.gov

We encourage you to stop in and see these items. We may have some oyster plates as well. And check out our book selections, you just might find a cookbook with ideal recipes for crabs, oysters, or perfect side dishes. Yep, we’ll be here and waitin’ for ya!

US Navy Cutlass – Knights Templar Sword

These two antique pieces arrived recently. We’re excited to share them with you.

Civil War Naval Cutlass

First, let’s share a little background regarding this Naval Cutlass:

First cousin to the longer, lighter cavalry saber, the naval cutlass was designed for sea-fighting as the saber was adapted to land-battles. Because boarding actions were fought on the crowded decks of small vessels amid tangles of shrouds and splintered spars and struggling shipmates and foemen, Jack Tar’s blade had to be short for easy control, and heavy enough to provide its own momentum in slashing. (Unlike the cavalry trooper’s trusty saber, Jack’s cutlass did not have the weight of a galloping horse behind it!) The cutlass had a straight or slightly-curved blade designed both for cutting and thrusting. A large, enclosed guard shielded the swordsman’s hand.

from website History.naval.mil

Are you wondering just who “Jack Tar” might be? Here’s a bit of info:

Jack Tar (also JacktarJack-tar or Tar) is a common English term originally used to refer to seamen of the Merchant or Royal Navy, particularly during the period of the British Empire. By World War I the term was used as a nickname for those in the U.S. Navy. Members of the public and seafarers alike made use of the name in identifying those who went to sea. It was not used as a pejorative and sailors were happy to use the term to label themselves.

from Wikipedia
US Naval Cutlass (Civil War) and early 1900s Ceremonial Sword of Knights Templar
US Naval Cutlass on left – Ceremonial Sword of Knights Templar on right

There’s an interesting link from this cutlass to Havre de Grace via Commodore John Rodgers.

In 1808, Commodore John Rodgers of the Brooklyn Navy Yard awarded Nathan Starr a contract for 2,000 cutlasses at $2.50 each. This weapon was 35 ¼ inches long with a single-edged, straight blade. The guard was made of iron, beaten to concavity and lacquered black. The grip was a maple cylinder protected from splitting by two metal rings (ferrules) clamped around the handle near its upper and lower ends. In the hands of New England seamen, these cutlasses felled scores of Britons during bloody boarding actions in the War of 1812, including the capture by HMS Shannonof James Lawrence’s Chesapeake in 1813, and Wasp‘s victory over HMS Reindeer in 1814, one of the fiercest cutlass-fights in the annals of the sea.

from History.Naval.Mil

Rodgers Tavern (where Abbey’s Burger will open later this month) is connected to the Rodgers Family and their history with Havre de Grace. Here’s a tribute to Commodore Rodgers from Missouri Senator Thomas Hart Benton:

When I first saw Commodore Rodgers, which was after I had reached senatorial age and station, he recalled to me the idea of those modern admirals, and subsequent acquaintance confirmed the impression then made.

He was to me the complete impersonation of my idea of the perfect naval commander; person, mind and manners with the qualities of command grafted on the groundwork of a good citizen and good father of a family and all lodged in a frame to bespeak the seaman and officer. His very figure and face were those of the naval hero such as we conceive from naval songs and ballads and from the course of life which the sea officer leads exposed to the double peril of waves and war, contending with the storms of the elements as well as with the storm of battle. We associate the idea of bodily power with such a life, and when we find them united the heroic qualities in a frame of powerful muscular development, we experience a grateful feeling of completeness which fulfils a natural expectation and leaves nothing to be desired.

from War of 1812 Archaeology

Now you can see how easily you can get pulled into learning a bit of history while at the same time having fun!

Knights Templar Ceremonial Sword

There is a great deal of folklore and conspiracy theory when you speak of the Knights Templar of the Middle Ages. For an interesting read, consider this article10 Thinks You Never Knew About The Knights Templar by Dan Jones in the British Edition of GQ Magazine.

The sword with its scabbard is probably early 1900s. George is still researching it.

Here’s another photos of these two awesome antique pieces:

U.S. Naval Cutlass - Civil War period and Ceremonial Sword of Knights Templar.

We look forward to having you drop by and view these two pieces of history. Remember, George is the “Collector of Collections.” We’ll be watchin’ for ya to stop by so we can help you find your favorites!

We Celebrate the Opera House

HdG Opera House logo

 

Havre de Grace Opera House
1st Anniversary!

Havre de Grace Opera House 2018

It is exciting to be celebrating the First Anniversary of the newly restored Havre de Grace Cultural Center by sharing a number of items from our shop and our Havre de Grace history collection for their display. Offering hundreds of programs for the youngest to the oldest citizens of our city and to residents and visitors alike, the HdG Opera House is a beacon to creatives. If you’ve not visited the Opera House yet, this weekend rounds out a week of celebration. CLICK HERE to see what’s happening and to purchase your tickets for their weekend celebrations and upcoming events. 

Showboat 1960s Theater on the Barge in Havre de Grace, MD

 

Havre de Grace has the energy of the arts running in its veins. From early days of minstrel shows and theater on a barge to today’s Tidewater Players (our local community theater group), performing on stages continues to be alive and well.

 

 

The beautifully restored HdG Opera House!

Exterior of restored HdG Opera House 2018

Visit the Havre de Grace Opera House at 121 N. Union Avenue. You’ll not only find wonderful performances, but there is also a wall of interesting historical photos and memorabilia sharing the history of the building itself and theater in Havre de Grace. 

 

 

Need A Fun Thing To Do (even if it rains)?

VISIT OUR BEER MUZEUM During First Friday!

Thousands of collectible bottles, decanters, mirrors, and more – plus our Nascar Collection is upstairs. If the weather turns out a bit too wet, we’ll be here! Also, don’t forget that tomorrow evening, June 2, we have a …

Paranormal Investigation and Haunted Buildings Walking Tour

… happening from 9pm – 11pm. Let us know you’d like a space reserved for you and friends.

Paranormal Investigation and Haunted Buildings Walking Tour at Bahoukas in Havre de Grace

Yes, we’ll be watchin’ for ya. (If you need one, we even have a few umbrellas). We’re always ready to have fun at Bahoukas!

Ghost Tours Return to Bahoukas

… with the addition of Haunted Buildings Walking Tour

Paranormal Investigations and Haunted History Buildings Walking Tour at Bahoukas in Havre de GraceWe’re excited to be bringing back our Ghost Tours with the intriguing professional Dead of Night Paranormal Investigators! Take part in an actual investigation. Learn how they use their equipment to locate entities in our building and try to communicate with them. Also, new this year, enjoy a walking tour that encompasses approximately 6 blocks and listen to George – our casual historian – share stories and history of our haunted buildings.

The next two dates are Saturdays: April 21 and May 19 from 9pm – 11pm.  Adults:  $15.00  Children:  $10  Call George today and reserve your spaces.  410-942-1290  Hurry – space is limited to 25 people. We will continue the event in inclement weather by showing a video of the walking tour if we can ‘walk it.’

Yes, you know, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Day 31 – 44 Gift Giving Ideas from Bahoukas

Day 31 We Talk OYSTERS!

In our area, oysters are popular. An oyster platter is an appreciated gift – possibly a perfect hostess gift! We also have several tins from oyster packing firms. These items are very collectible!

Oyster Platters and several oyster tins for the collector available at Bahoukas in Havre de Grace, MD

We also have this framed print “Unloading Oyster Luggers 1905” and the book Heavy Industries of Yester Year – Harford County’s Rural Heritage by Jack Shagena Jr. and Henry C. Peden, Jr. This book is available in our shop.

framed print "Unloading Oyster Luggers 1905"

Early French settlers designed small boats that would easily navigate the waters between ships and in Louisiana’s swamps.  These boats were called French canots; they had a rounded bottom and a small fin that allowed them to go in shallow water.  They became popular fishing boats and then oyster boats.  These canots eventually became known everywhere as New Orleans Oyster Luggers.

Click this link for more info.

Here’s a few tidbits about oysters and the Chesapeake Bay:

500 B.C.: The earliest evidence of oyster harvesting — shell deposits called middens — indicate that people living in the Chesapeake region were eating oysters and other shellfish as long as early as 2,500 B.C.

1600s: Early colonial settlers frequently remark on the size and quantity of oysters in the Chesapeake Bay. Oysters were likely harvested using boats, rakes and by wading into shallow water to simply gather them.

read more in the article in The Baltimore Sun

Yes, we have quite a variety of ideas in our 44 Days of Gift Giving. So come on in and visit us, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Day 11 – Gift Giving Ideas from Bahoukas

Havre de Grace Collectibles Make Day 11 Gift Giving Special

Havre de Grace Memorabilia including Westwood Farm milk bottle, labels for Taylor at Seneca or JM Macklem (tomatoes), 2 books, 2 commemorative plates, B&S brand shortening tin, etc.

We KNOW there are folks on your list who would truly appreciate a gift from our Havre de Grace Collectibles. We have a variety of canning labels which, by the way, make great decorating for the kitchen! Above is also a milk bottle from Westwood Farm and two commemorative plates – one from the US Bi-Centennial and the other the Havre de Grace United Methodist Church. We have a nice variety of history books for Havre de Grace and Harford County to choose from.

The collector items at the top would make great pieces to add to your holiday decorations – tucked in greens and candles for a buffet table or mantle piece. Lots more ideas await at Bahoukas. Stop in soon… the 44 Days of Gift Giving is counting down… we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

1858 map Harford County and 1803 map referencing Harmers Town

Harford County 1858 Map

1858 Harford County Maryland street map published by Jennings & Herrick

This map was published by Jennings & Herrick entirely from original surveys. It includes an inset of Havre de Grace Streets. (yep, we know it’s upside down. It is so fragile that we didn’t want it to tear,)

better photo of 1858 Harford Co map

Posted above is a better photo from Herrick, L. W. A map of Harford Co., Maryland, 1858. [Philadelphia?, Jennings & Herrick, 1858] Map. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, website. (Accessed July 12, 2017.)

George also has an 1803 map regarding “Harmers Town as established by the concerned parties in the year 1796”

Made from tracings from the original maps in the clerks office at Bel Air, Nov. 1803. Below are some great snapshots of the map

1803 map re: Harmers Town (later Havre de Grace)

Stop by Bahoukas Antique Mall to view many historic pieces related to Havre de Grace history. Many are not for sale, but George has plenty of stories to make it worth your while. Of course, we have 9,000 sq ft of antiques and collectibles plus another 2,200 sq ft of browsing in the Beer MuZeum (and yes, most of this IS for sale). We’ll be watchin’ for ya!

 

 

Charity Minstrel Shows and Follies

Local Talent Has ALWAYS Been A Community Asset

Having just enjoyed our 2017 Havre de Grace Independence Celebration, it seems like the perfect time to share some volunteer community activities of years past. Check out these programs from entertaining events!

Susquehanna Follies brochure - benefits the HdG Baseball Club at the State Theater

This 1930s brochure is delightful. Lots of local talent… and the layout is very interesting. On each page is an ‘act’ along with advertising. You won’t miss anyone – advertising support, sponsors, or participants in the ‘follies!’ This would be so much fun today!

Elks' Charity Minstrel Show 1953 brochure

This 1953 program benefiting the Elks’ Club and their charity programs took place at the Havre de Grace High School auditorium. Another interesting program for a great cause! Here’s the actual program in the booklet:

Elks' Charity Minstrel Show program - 1953

Look at the participation! We love these examples of community involvement and the great talent available. Stop by to check out these intriguing pamphlets and the many other historical pieces that can be seen at Bahoukas Antique Mall.

In 1991 the United Methodist Church Celebrated 200 years!

Havre de Grace UMC has a long history!

Havre de Grace United Methodist Church in 1821-1840

I believe that the church first operated from the preacher’s home. This is the first building where the congregation met. We’re double checking. But I believe the Susquehanna Hose Company firehouse at the corner of Union and Pennington Avenue is where the building stood.

Supposedly, part of the wall was incorporated in the firehouse structure. We’re trying to find out if you can see it.

What a wonderful history. And this booklet tells a very complete story.

You are encouraged to learn more on their website. Better yet, please visit! It’s a beautiful building located at 101 South Union Avenue since 1902!

Havre de Grace United Methodist Church

photo from their website

booklet celebrating 200 year anniversary of Havre de Grace Methodist Church 1991

The spirit of enterprise and brotherly helpfulness is the great wellspring of a city’s progress

Kidwiler and Havre de Grace Public Library

History of Havre de Grace by Elias W. Kidwiler - Bahoukas Antiques  

In Stanley M. Barrett and Elias W. Kidwiler’s book, History of Havre de Grace – “The Town We Live In”, we learn of Palmer’s Island, later known as Watson’s Island, and now know as Garrett’s Island. … Then we read of Harmers Town, sold to Stockett, “after 1700 it was known officially as “The Susquehanna Lower Ferry.” In 1714 it again changed hands (ownership) to John Stokes. According to Kidwiler’s writings, In 1785 the Susquehanna Lower Ferry was incorporated as a town with a commission form of government and was officially given its present name (Havre de Grace).

Havre de Grace, from the date of its incorporation as a town, continued to grow steadily in population and wealth. Fishing was the source of income for many of its citizens. The inns and hotels required the services of a considerable number of people. During the long, hard winters when the river froze to a depth of eighteen inches or more, many men were engaged in cutting, storing and shipping ice. There were services necessary for the farmers who made Havre de Grace their shopping center – blacksmith shops, wagon factories and repair shops, feed stores, general stores and hardware stores. Canneries were built in the city and provided an outlet for more corn and tomatoes than the farmers had been formerly disposing of, and took a considerable portion of the local fishermen’s catch. The coming of the railroad meant employment for both skilled and unskilled labor.

Again – apologies for the blur… We have duplicates of some of the historic items in the store; many we do not. Stop in and see these for yourself. Interesting perspectives of our community over the years.

Historic Havre de Grace - 1926 - HdG Public Library

The ‘foreword’ inside the Historic Havre de Grace booklet, published by the Havre de Grace Public Library in 1926 reads as follows:

This brief history of the city of Havre de Grace has been compiled by the ladies of the Library Committee, and is offered to the public on the occasion of the second anniversary of the opening of the Havre de Grace Public Library. For assistance in this work we acknowledge indebtedness to the Records of the Maryland Historical Society, Walter W. Preston’s “History of Harford County,” L. B. Browne’s “Historical Sketch of St. John’s Church” and many friends who have come forward with newspaper clippings of bygone days. We feel we have merely scratched the surface of a fascinating theme and hope our efforts may inspire some abler historian to do full justice to this subject.

title page - Historic Havre de Grace 1926

Foreword - Historic Havre de Grace - 1926

The conclusion in the Public Library’s 1926 publication is a wonderful tribute to a city’s growth. It follows:

We have endeavored to picture for you the growth and development of our city from its early beginning. First, a family or two, then, a cluster of houses sheltering an intrepid band which decided to seek no further. A few survived the early hardships, and the call of kindred inspired others to come. What makes a city grow? Is it not the spirit of its people, their desire to make their surroundings safe and attractive and the measure of their neighborly kindness which influences others to join with them for mutual welfare? A man is not attracted to a town where his best efforts will bring him no reward and his friendly advances are repulsed. The spirit of enterprise and brotherly helpfulness is the great wellspring of a city’s progress, and this spirit in an increased measure is our desire for Havre de Grace.

There is much wisdom for us in the 21st century from the perspective presented in these books and pamplets of yesteryear!

School Rules!

Booklet from the 1950s Jr-Sr High School

Havre de Grace School Rules - 1950s

As the school year comes to a close, we wanted to share this interesting booklet from the 1950s. It’s a handbook for Havre de Grace Jr.-Sr. High School. It explains “If you wish to be well-liked… “, information regarding the Parent-Teacher Association (membership of 600!), and the rules regarding behavior, tardiness, etc. along with the results of breaking these rules.

Do you remember these rules? Were they enforced?

Stop in and take a peek. George has it at the counter! He’d love to hear your stories!

Commemorative Plates 2.0

Concord Point Lighthouse – Havre de Grace History

Havre de Grace Celebrates Nation's Bicentennial - Bahoukas

As the nation celebrated her bicentennial 1776-1976, the above plate highlights historical architecture of Havre de Grace including: Concord Point Lighthouse, the old hospital, city park (Tydings Park),
Decoy Carvers, Bayou Hotel (now condominiums), Burns Carriage Shop, the American Legion Post 47, the Draw Bridge (Amtrak), old railroad station, the railroad cut (would have been St. Clair – now Pennington Ave), and the Old Bank Building (now the beautiful La Banque de Fleuve event venue at 321 St. John St)

History of Concord Pt Lighthouse on back of plate - Bahoukas

Apologies for the blurry photo above…

The above plate highlights our Concord Point Lighthouse, The Lafayette Statue, Rodgers House, the bell at our First High School, The Lockhouse (Susquehanna Museum), and St. John’s Church (presently being restored).

This popular plate showcases the Lighthouses of the Chesapeake, Maryland.

Visit BAHOUKAS Antique Mall and Beer MuZeum Soon! There’s always something interesting!

 

Turn That Plate Over!

Commemorative Plates Offer Bits of Havre de Grace History

This wonderful plate commemorates the Havre de Grace Double Decker Bridge!

Havre de Grace Double Decker Bridge Commemorative Plate

The back of this plate offers interesting facts that also
give us a glimpse of the economics of earlier times.

back of HdG double decker bridge commemorative plate

Does anyone know who the 7 citizens were that purchased the bridge for $700 in 1908? Fascinating!

Another interesting commemorative plate features the Havre de Grace Methodist Church.

Havre de Grace United Methodist Church Commemorative Plate

Even more interesting, are the details on the back of this plate offering
more information about the Methodist Church.

details on back of HdG Methodist Church commemorative plate

Where was the church located before this building went up?
Was it on the same corner? Or somewhere else?

When you’re looking for collectibles, be sure to check out the back, underside, inside the lid, etc. for interesting details that can often be found regarding the item. Be sure to stop in and chat with George at Bahoukas Antique Mall and Beer MuZeum. There’s always something interesting happening there!

Paranormal Investigation April 22

We’re excited to have the Dead of Night Paranormal Investigation Team here once again.

Join us for a few history facts from George, and then some very techie investigating to learn more about the store’s less visible inhabitants. Here are two short audio clips from last month’s visit. We had 18 participants plus the investigators.

Don’t Leave…

Here…

Here’s all the details:

April 22 2017 Dead of Night Paranormal Investigators return to Bahoukas