Looking for A New Collection? Bossons Maybe?

BOSSONS – THE FACES THAT LAUNCHED A THOUSAND COLLECTIONS

Bossons is the name given to an extraordinary collection of character wall masks, figurines, shelf ornaments, animal studies, wall plaques, lamp bases, bookends, wall clocks, thermometers, barometers, pottery figures and mirrors that were produced by the W. H. Bossons Company of Congleton, England between 1948 and 1996. The brainchild of a talented father and son team, they have become highly sought after works of art all around the world, but especially in the USA and England. 

from Bossons.com
Bosson Chalk Heads - 2
Bosson Chalk Heads

Talk about a small business with a quality of excellence!

Ray Bossons was an extremely talented artist with an intuitive ability to anticipate market trends. He was a perfectionist with regard to the anatomical detail, artistic excellence and historical accuracy of each item of art the company created. He was the creative genius and without question, the designer extraordinaire of the W. H. Bossons companies following the death of his father, W. H. Bossons in 1951. The company’s reputation spread within a comparatively short period of time to all the principal markets of the world. Most of the original ideas and basic concepts came from Ray Bossons fertile imagination. He would sketch the ideas for the wall masks and figurines after much research on each character to be portrayed and relied on his extensive library for research material. The original models were executed in clay by highly talented sculptors with no limit set on the time it took to create an original model.* Ray Bossons would set the standards for the pieces and then turn them over to the staff of painters to complete.

from Bossons.com
*italics by post author

This unique selection of Bosson Chalk Heads can be a perfect start to a new collection. Stop in and see them for yourself. We’re here and we’re watchin’ for ya.

UPDATE: Yes, we WILL be open on New Year’s Day!

Unique Jacks

This selection of jacks is pretty unique. The center one is a train jack, the outside ones are car jacks.

Vintage Train Jack
vintage car jack
Vintage Car Jack
vintage car jack
Vintage Car Jack

These are certainly unique to our shop. Have someone on your gift list that just might be looking for one of these. Stop in today and pick it up. In the meantime, check out the great restoration in the video below. Beautiful!

All of Us at Bahoukas wish you a safe and wonderful Holiday!

Remember, we’re closed on Christmas Day and New Years Day. Give us a call if you’re stopping by Christmas Eve or New Year’s Eve to be sure we didn’t sneak out early! Yeah, we like to celebrate, too. And yes, we’re watchin’ for ya. So hurry in!

Lunch Boxes and School Desks

A bit of Lunch Box History

Dads carried metal tins with lunch to their jobs in the coal mines and factories. Of course, it wasn’t long before their children wanted to copy their dads.

… the first commercial lunch boxes, which resembled metal picnic baskets decorated with scenes of playing children, came out in 1902.

from Smithsonian Magazine

The first lunch box decorated with a famous licensed character was introduced in 1935. Produced by Geuder, Paeschke & Frey, it featured Mickey Mouse, and was a four-color lithographed oval tin, with a pull-out tray inside. It had no vacuum bottle, but did have a handle.

In 1950, Aladdin Industries created the first children’s lunch box based on a television show, Hopalong Cassidy. The Hopalong Cassidy lunch kit, or “Hoppy”, quickly became Aladdin’s cash cow. Debuting in time for back-to-school 1950, it would go on to sell 600,000 units in its first year alone, each at US$2.39. In 1953, Roy Rogers and Dale Evans were featured on models introduced by American Thermos.

from Wikipedia
lunch boxes of metal and plastic at Bahoukas
Huge collection of decorated lunchboxes in plastic and metal

Many of the latest additions are complete with thermoses as well. Do stop in and check it out. They are a great last-minute gift for a child in your life – or your favorite collector. Remember, not just great for lunch, but fun for picnics, playing, keeping treasures, and more.

School Desks

Wooden school desk, cast iron base, lid lifts to a cubby for storing paper and books
Beautiful wooden and cast iron school desk.

The above desk is in beautiful condition. We also have another as pictured below:

wood school desk with cast iron base, lid lifts up for a cubby that can hold books and papers
Another beautiful wood school desk.

Another choice is this wood desk:

The front of the desk had the bench for the desk that sat in front of it

1881: The Fashion School Desk

The First Model

The first school desk was made in 1880 by John D. Loughlin in Sidney, Ohio. The desk, known as “The Fashion Desk,” proved to be extremely popular across the country. The practicality of the desks allowed for many to be put together in a one room schoolhouse, and the fashion aspect of it was aesthetically pleasing to those in the education industry. Loughlin’s marketing campaign also helped to sell these desks, which would eventually sweep the nation. The “Fashion Desks” were desks attached to one another and were big enough to seat two or three children. Usually, there was an inkwell so that the student could replenish his pen’s supply.

from TheClassroom.com

The Sidney School Furniture Company, located in Sidney, Ohio, began manufacturing the popular “Fashion” school desk in 1881. Advertising for the desk claimed, “No desk in the market is made with more care, nor of better materials than the ‘Fashion,’ and none has met with a more popular reception, or gives better satisfaction.” The desk featured a Patent T-head, which eliminated screws and bolts by joining the wood of the top, back, and seat to the legs, which were made of cast iron.

from EdTechMagazine.com
old wooden school chair with writing pad

Old School Chair

… with writing pad. These are solid and have a shelf on the bottom to place books and bags.

So whether it’s a lunchbox or a school desk, we can add a last-minute ‘surprise’ to your holiday gift-giving. Hurry in. We’re watchin’ for ya so that we can help you with your last-minute searches. Don’t forget, we DO CLOSE for Christmas Day and New Years Day. (Give us a call to be sure we didn’t leave early on the eve of both!) Happy Holidays!

Do You Love Manual Typewriters?

The above photo is a 1910 Oliver Typewriter available in our store. Here’s a great quote from a collector’s website:

Towards the end of the nineteenth century, the typewriter industry was developing rapidly. Before the Oliver typewriter entered the market, text remained hidden from the typist on the underside of the platen as it was typeset until the platen was lifted. This design was convention across many successful typewriter brands of the era. However, the typewriting industry was soon revolutionized by Reverend Thomas Oliver and his eponymous invention. The Oliver typewriter features two towers of typebars which strike down onto the platen, allowing the text to remain visible at all times. With this iconic typing mechanism, the Oliver become known as The Standard Visible Writer.

from Olivertypewriters.com

History of Manual Typewriters

The history of manual typewriters began in 1575, when an Italian printmaker, Francesco Rampazetto, invented a machine to impress letters on papers. Not until 1714 did a Brit named Henry Mill take out a patent for a machine similar to a typewriter. 

from Writers-Alliance.org

It was until 1874 that these typewriters were commercially introduced to Europe and America. By the early 1900s, the electric typewriter would hit the market.

Tom Thumb Cash Registers and Typewriter

Did you ever get one of these for a Christmas gift? The cash registers came first to be followed in 1953 with the Tom Thumb Typewriter.

Tom Thumb toy typewriter by Western Stamping Co
Tom Thumb toy typewriter by Western Stamping Co.

It was the beginning of the glory days of the durable metal Tom Thumb toy cash register, manufactured exclusively at Western Stamping Co., 2203 W. Michigan Ave.

“I bet they made 600,000 of those cash registers a year for at least 10 years,” said Edna Whiting, 86, of Blackman Township, daughter of Arthur Poole, a company founder.

… The toy cash register’s keys were first attached one at a time. By 1953, they were attached in one process, which upped production and enabled the company to produce half a million cash registers and 100,000 typewriters that year.

from Peek Through Time: Toys fom Western Stamping
Royal manual typewriter 1963
1963 Royal Manual Typewriter

Royal Typewriters

Many of us “boomers” probably remember the heavy black Royal typewriter. They seemed to last FOREVER! This interesting quote may help explain why:

To promote the ruggedness of its typewriters, George Edward Smith, president of Royal bought a Ford-Stout tri-motor airplane in August 1927. This plane will drop over 200 typewriters in crates with parachutes to dealers over the eastern seaboard of the USA. Royal will eventually deliver over 11,000 this way with only 10 being damaged.

from Royal.com

WOW! That’s quite a promotion!!!

Writers and Their Typewriters

Many famous writers used their typewriters, often long after the computer arrived.

Author Will Self explains why writers use a manual typewriter: “I think the computer user does their thinking on the screen, and the non-computer user is compelled, because he or she has to retype a whole text, to do a lot more thinking in the head.”

from Writers Alliance

In 1883, Mark Twain was the first to present his ‘typewritten manuscript” to a publisher. The book? Life on the Mississippi

And did you know that J.R.R. Tolkein typed and retyped his Lord of the Rings manually on a typewriter? Jack Kerouac was a speed typist at 100 words per minute!

Read more about writers and the typewriters in the link in the above post.

No matter what the reason: you love to type on a manual typewriter, you’re fascinated by the mechanics themselves, or you’re a collector! Stop by and browse our collection of typewriters. We’re here and we most certainly are watchin’ for ya!

Hand Saws – a useful tool

Carpentry is a skill that came into being when mankind first decided to build, and crude tools were fashioned to help in the process. While early tools were rough, as time went by, the necessity of having better saws led to the more refined handsaw.

from HomeSteady.com

Vintage Hand Saws

We have a variety of hand saws available in the store that can be sharpened and used or appreciated as a decorative item for a home or shop. (Yes, there are ice tongs in this photo – chuckle – you can read about them in an earlier post).

Paintings

… show saws in use as early as Egyptian times! These saws were made of copper and are depicted as a large blade with no handle.

from WonkeeDonkeeTools.co.uk

From cutting trees to building homes…

The hand saw gave mankind the ability to keep warm, cook food, and build homes, barns, churches, and business structures. It’s another tool that we take for granted but was key to our development. Of course, today we have all sorts of electric saws. But we could still build with the hand saw even if we lost ‘the grid.’

By the 1800s, handsaws could be found in almost every home and were used to cut wood for fires as well as building. Various manufacturers such as Sheffield and Cam produced different styles and sizes for different uses, with both flat rectangular edges and sloped rounded end designs. Handles varied as well, some with an opening and others that closed about the hand. Often companies engraved their name across the metal or created fancy curved handles.

from WonkeeDonkeeTools.co.uk

Because of its versatility, the handsaw is still an important tool for carpenters and woodworkers today. Today’s models look very much as they did back in the 18th century, but there are significant differences. Handsaws often have plastic handles and removable blades. The metals are often made to be rust resistant; and they can be thicker or multi-bladed for faster cutting. Some models are able to cut through glass, veneer and even metal.

from HomeSteady.com

Whether you’re a prepper looking for a useful tool, someone who loves decorating with vintage tools, a collector, or a woodworker that appreciates the vintage tools, we invite you to stop in and see what we have. Of course, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Ice for Your Icebox!

The tools pictured are ice tongs and ice saw used to cut blocks of ice from the Susquehanna River when it froze thick enough – ideally 8″ thick! It was hard work. The blocks of ice at 8″ thick would average 2.67 cubic feet and weigh about 150 lbs (considered manageable weight)! This info is included in the book: Heavy Industries of Yesteryear, Harford County’s Rural Heritage, by Jack L. Shagena, Jr. and Henry C. Peden, Jr. (available in our store).

book cover for Heavy Industries of Yesteryear, Harford County's Rural Heritage
Excerpt about ice-harvesting from the book, Heavy Industries of Yesteryear, Harford County's Rural Heritage

Why did we need ice blocks?

1920s icebox

Into the 1930s, households used large blocks of ice to keep food cold in “iceboxes.”

This photo is from the 1920s. Courtesy of the Sloane Collection.

By the end of the 1800s, many American households stored their perishable food in an insulated “icebox” that was usually made of wood and lined with tin or zinc. A large block of ice was stored inside to keep these early refrigerators chilly. By this point, cold had become the clear choice among food preservation methods, proving less labor-intensive and more effective at preventing spoilage. Other techniques, like salting, drying, and canning, erased any appearance of freshness and required more time to prepare. Iceboxes also presented a new way to save prepared foods—or leftovers—that previously might not have lasted beyond one meal.

from AmericanHistory.si.edu

Abbott Bros Ice House

Photo of Abbott Bros Ice House

The above photo is of Abbott Bros Ice House, located where the Havre de Grace Marine Center is on Water Street in Havre de Grace.

For the local history lover on your holiday gift list, at least one of the items featured, the book, and the Abbott Bros Ice House photo (available at Bahoukas) would make an awesome addition to their collection. Talk to George today.

In the meantime, hurry in to find YOUR favorite items for someone on your gift list. And yes, we’re definitely watchin’ for ya!

Tools for the Season

These cast iron kettles are a size 4 and 8. The larger is a Jos Bell & Co.

Heat On? Fireplaces Working?

It’s the season where we begin to crank up the heat. Along with the warm and cozy fireplaces and pellet stoves or even just the welcome heat from your furnace, dry air starts to affect our comfort. Many folks love to put a kettle of water on the stove and let it add a bit of humidity to create a more comfortable – and healthy – home!

These two kettles are definitely up to the task. Come see them for yourself. We also have a number of other cast iron items waiting for you to consider.

Might You Be A Hunter?

Electric Wellsaw model 400 for cutting meat – from the 1950s

Along with cooler temps, it’s also hunting season. This 1950 Wellsaw model 400 electric saw is for cutting meat. It does work.

You know, here at Bahoukas Antique Mall and Beer MuZeum, you just never know what our ‘collector of collections’ might have in the shop. So hurry in and enjoy a look back while considering how you might use these very collections to make your life forward a bit easier or more fun.

Yep, we’re here – ready to help you find the most unique of holiday gifts. And we’re watchin’ for ya!

Vintage Christmas Santas

Wishing you a Happy Thanksgiving!

Everyone at Bahoukas Antique Mall and Beer MuZeum wishes you a Happy Thanksgiving, hopefully, shared with family and friends. PLEASE NOTE that we are CLOSED for Thanksgiving Day to enjoy our own families and to appreciate all that we’ve been given. Regular hours will return tomorrow and we’ll be open 7 days/week until Christmas Day!

We know that as soon as this holiday is over, folks will be “full steam ahead” for holiday decorating and gift-giving ideas. The above photo gives you a peek at our latest addition to our vintage holiday decorations – beautiful Vintage Santas!

Santa’s Kaleidoscope – collectible figural glass ornaments

Glass Ornaments

These beautiful very collectible, figural glass ornaments are beautiful. The set, from Santa’s Kaleidoscope, is waiting for just the right home to add a bit of pizzazz to your holiday decor!

Vintage Christmas Decor

Vintage Christmas Decorations

Here’s a sampling of more vintage and very collectible decorations to add a bit of whimsy to your holiday decor. Hurry in. These items tend to go quickly. And yes, we’re watchin’ for ya and are ready to point you in the right direction!

Again, Happy Thanksgiving. Safe travels. Always be grateful!

Collectible Lighters and Ashtrays

Whether or not you smoke, ashtrays are appealing collectibles for numerous reasons.

First, they are small, which means you can acquire hundreds of ashtrays and display them in a relatively finite amount of space.

Second, they were made out of a wide range of materials, so if you are a fan of art glass, pounded copper, or ceramics, there is bound to be an ashtray for you.

Third, ashtrays were produced during some of the most creative periods in history, which means there are ashtrays for fans of the Victorian era, Arts and Crafts, and Art Deco.

Finally, ashtrays are snapshots of their culture, so it is not uncommon to find ashtrays that were produced to advertise products and events of the day.

from Collector’s Weekly

Ashtrays

variety of collectible ashtrays
Ashtrays came in all styles – silly to beautifully designed, touristy and promotional.

To show you just how diverse ashtray collections can be, here we show you a German Spinner by Gerzt (top center), the resting Mexican (made in Japan), the promotional ashtray from PENROSE, and the horse’s ‘arse’. Yep, something for everyone!

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

Did you know that ashtrays are a design element included in the Cooper Hewitt Museum, located in the Andrew Carnegie Mansion on Fifth Avenue, NYC? We sure wish we had one of these in our collection!

Russel Wright designed ashtray

… is displayed at the Cooper Hewitt

Preserving the natural qualities of ceramics in spite of the dominance of machine-produced pottery has been a challenge for designers since the introduction of machinery to the production process in the eighteenth century.

Russel Wright addressed this design dilemma through his biomorphic earthenware. This ashtray, part of a 1949 series manufactured by Sterling China for hotels and restaurants, embodies Wright’s idea of designing machine-made ceramics that simulate their handcrafted counterparts. Flaring up and out from its low base, the ashtray has a curved, asymmetrical rim that appears as though it was pinched and folded by hand. Although entirely molded by machine, the ashtray’s profile suggests the involvement of human contact throughout its production. The organic form also makes the ashtray user-friendly and invites human contact and interactions: the undulating rim is excellent for resting cigarettes, and the groove holds a matchbook perfectly. The groove also allowed restaurant workers to stack multiple ashtrays, the base of one fitting neatly into the ashtray below.

from Cooper Hewitt

Lighters

Do you ever wonder who invented the first lighter? No, it wasn’t the Zippo Company, though they certainly improved on it! The first was invented in 1823. The Zippo didn’t come into the picture until 1932.

Johann Wolfgang Döbereiner invented the first lighter known as “Döbereiner’s Lamp.” It looked nothing like the lighters we use today and was also difficult to use and extremely dangerous.

from Quality Logo Products
Variety of tabletop novelty lighters: military shell, Zippo, and cigarette case with lighter

The above lighters can be found in our shop and include: Top left: a cigarette case with lighter, a Queen Anne style lighter, a novelty grenade, military shell, and card cube, a Zippo lighter, and a rather art deco looking styled tabletop lighter.

So if you, or someone you know, has a collection of lighters and/or ashtrays, you just might want to check our collection. We’re here. And we’re watchin’ for ya!

Cast Iron Figures and Banks

We’ve posted about our cast iron figures many times. To see other posts, VISIT HERE.

Cast Iron Banks

Several of our cast-iron figures are actually banks. Great way to encourage a little saver to collect those coins found on the sidewalk!

The lion is a cast iron bank. The others are outstanding cast iron paperweights or perfect for a shelf!
Cast iron dog figures. The one on the right is also a bank.
cast iron cow
Closer detail of the fox and the lion cast iron figures
Are these just the cutest cast iron dog figurines!

Here, at Bahoukas Antiques, we have a wonderfully diverse collection of cast iron figures that also include mechanical banks and huge door knockers. Some are vintage and very collectible, while others are reproductions. All of them are beautiful! Stop in soon. Yeppir, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

German Cobalt Blue Wine Dispenser

We’ve not been able to find a lot about this piece – a German stoneware wine cask/dispenser in Cobalt blue and white. We did find a similar piece on an auction site. CLICK HERE to view it.

Words from Martin Luther on the end of the Cobalt blue and white German wine cask/dispenser.

Thanks to Edel Patterson, owner of Edel’s Bridal Shop here in Havre de Grace, we are able to give you the translation on this beautiful wine dispenser/cask.

Iss, was gar ist.
Trink, was klar ist.
Sprich, was wahr ist.
Lieb, was rar ist.

In English, it translates as follows and is from Martin Luther:

Eat what is done.
Drink what is clear.
Speak what is true.
Love what is rare.

More detail of the gnomes and design on this German cobalt blue and white stoneware wine cask/dispnser

This piece recently arrived at Bahoukas and it’s truly exquisite!

While we’re discussing wine casks/dispensers, have you ever wondered who might have the World’s Largest Wine Barrel?

World’s Largest Wine Barrel

Well, wonder no more… within the cellars of the Heidelberg Castle in German, is the Heidelberg Tun:

The Heidelberg Tun (German: Großes Fass), or Great Heidelberg Tun, is an extremely large wine vat contained within the cellars of Heidelberg Castle. There have been four such barrels in the history of Heidelberg. In 1751, the year of its construction, the present one had a capacity of 221,726 litres (58,574 U.S. gallons). Due to the drying of the wood its current capacity is 219,000 litres (57,854 U.S. gallons). One hundred and thirty oak trees were reputedly used in its construction. It has only rarely been used as a wine barrel, and in fact presently enjoys more use as a tourist attraction, and also as a dance floor since one was constructed on top of the tun.

from Wikipedia

Heidelberg Tun

Located in the cellars of the Heidelberg Castle is this mammoth wine barrel. Check out the size of the people around it and the stairway to the right that takes you up to the top landing. WOW!

Now that we’ve piqued your interest. Stop in and see the beautiful stoneware wine cask. And, of course, we’re watchin’ for ya!

Like to Sew?

Well, maybe you don’t like to sew. But these thread cabinets could easily be upcycled for any unique project you might have.

DID YOU KNOW THREAD SPOOLS WERE ONCE RECYCLED?

It was not until about 1800 that manufactured cotton thread was available to the hand sewers in the United States and Europe. Before that, textiles were sewn with silk or linen thread, and rarely homespun cotton or wool thread. At first, they were sold in hanks as some yarns still are. Thread came on wooden spools beginning about 1820. Like our beverage bottles, the spools could be returned for a deposit, to be refilled. In the mid-19th century, during the Industrial Revolution, textile manufacturing processes were some of the first to be modernized including the manufacture of cotton sewing thread.

from Post-Journal
Beautiful 1800s vintage sewing thread display case at Bahoukas Antiques.

What Ideas Might You Have?

Maybe you collect small items and the drawers would be perfect to store them and pull them out for display. Or possibly, you love notepaper and cards. These drawers might be perfect for keeping your collection. OR!!! Possibly a perfect place to store sheets of wrapping paper or even your artwork!

Love More History of Threads?

Photo from ScienceHistory.org showing a man working at DuPont's nylon production plant in Wilmington, DE, 1938
Images from DuPont’s nylon production plant in Wilmington, Delaware, 1938 (clockwise from top left). Mike McCall pours nylon chips into a hopper; the chips will be melted, measured out and filtered before being spun into filament. An unidentified worker oversees the operation of a draw twister, which twists polymer fibers into thread. Violet Grenda inspects skeins of nylon yarn.
Joseph X. Labovsky Collection, Science History Institute

DuPont in Wilmington, DE in the 1940s manufactured fully synthetic nylon thread. During WWII it was very difficult for women to get hosiery because they were made from silk thread, imported from Japan. DuPont worked to create a substitute that we know as ‘nylon stockings.’ If I remember correctly, the late Phil Barker, a former mayor of Havre de Grace, first worked at DuPont. He started out just cleaning, working up to ‘doffing’ – removing empty spools from the machines.

Of course, you probably have a very unique idea for using one or both of these beautiful 1800s sewing thread cabinets. Let us know how YOU might use them! Yes, we’re here and we’re watchin’ for ya!

Bottles, Bottles, Bottles

It’s been a while since we’ve shared our variety of bottle collections. An old bottle is a great way to upcycle – use to keep pens, show off a small bouquet or a single flower, or just add to a windowsill with a sprig of ivy. Check out just a few of our collections in the store.

Milk Bottles

scores of collectible milk bottles at Bahoukas Antique Mall in Havre de Grace
A great collection of milk bottles
Close up of a few collectible milk bottles at Bahoukas
Milk Bottle Sampler

Medicine Bottles

Do you love flowers? Well, our collection of bottles can give you beautiful cut flower containers. Consider these for a bud face or simple flower:

Shades of blue and clear glass bottles - beautiful on a window sill - Bahoukas in Havre de Grace
pharmaceutical bottles

CLICK ON OUR BOTTLES category (on the right side of our page) to see more complete posts about our many bottles available.

Vintage Bottles

vintage bottles including torpedo, igloo ink, blob top, crown top, and a clay Weiss Beer bottle - all available at Bahoukas Antiques in Havre de Grace, MD
Unique vintage bottles

Whether you have a windowsill filled with tiny bottles or a cabinet filled with your collection, we encourage you to stop into Bahoukas Antique Mall to see if one – or a dozen – might add to your collection or to your decor!

Absolutely, we will be watchin’ for ya!

“Cheese,” Pinholes, and Cameras

No, we’re not talking food – but cameras!

Yes, we’re living in a world full of selfies. Smiles that are so practiced that we’ve nearly forgotten what a great, spontaneous smile actually looks like. But stop by our shop for a great history of photography as you browse our vintage camera collection.

Over the past year or so, here at Bahoukas Antique Mall, we’ve acquired a surprising variety of antique, vintage, and collectible cameras. Whether you’re a photographer who loves to collect vintage cameras or someone who just loves how they look as unique decorating items in your home or office, we have a wonderful selection to choose from.

In researching the collecting of cameras, we found this most informative blog post on “How to Start a Camera Collection” from the blog Amateur Photographer. CLICK HERE to read a great post and maybe tickle your ‘collector self’ into considering a small camera collection.

Vintage cameras available at Bahoukas Antiques
Wonderful variety of vintage cameras at Bahoukas!

Here’s a short video that gives you a bit of camera history as well as the joy of collecting.

Did You Ever Make A Pinhole Camera?

Many can remember, as a kid, making a pinhole camera from an old shoebox. Did you ever do that? Have you shared that with your kids or grandkids. In today’s busy, techie world, it might be fun to share this simple project with a youngster in your life while teaching them a bit about how our eye and brain work to give us our vision and the pinhole camera is a great example.

Vintage Fun

Stop in today and browse our wonderful variety of cameras. Add to or start your collection today!

Of course, as always, we’ll be watchin’ for ya. Stop by and say ‘hello’ and share your favorite collectibles! You might just discover an addition that “you’ll just have to purchase!” See you soon!

Recycle-Repurpose-Kitchen Utensils

Are you serious about reusing items to keep them out of landfills? Many items in antique stores, besides adding to a collection or being a wonderful decorating item, are also quite useful.

Kitchen Utensils to Repurpose!

Look at this photo of one wall of kitchen items that could easily enjoy another few years of purpose.

Just one wall of great kitchen utensils that could be used today!
Rolling pins from days of yore available at Bahoukas

We also have

… rolling pins, cake dishes, pie tins, and cast iron pans to name just a few easily repurposed.

So many great ideas…

Cast iron pans

It’s well worth a visit to Bahoukas Antique Mall to see if we might have ‘just the item you need.’ If you need a link for other ideas, CLICK HERE. You’ll find dozens of items you probably never would think to look for at Bahoukas. Of course, we’re always watchin’ for ya!

US Navy Cutlass – Knights Templar Sword

These two antique pieces arrived recently. We’re excited to share them with you.

Civil War Naval Cutlass

First, let’s share a little background regarding this Naval Cutlass:

First cousin to the longer, lighter cavalry saber, the naval cutlass was designed for sea-fighting as the saber was adapted to land-battles. Because boarding actions were fought on the crowded decks of small vessels amid tangles of shrouds and splintered spars and struggling shipmates and foemen, Jack Tar’s blade had to be short for easy control, and heavy enough to provide its own momentum in slashing. (Unlike the cavalry trooper’s trusty saber, Jack’s cutlass did not have the weight of a galloping horse behind it!) The cutlass had a straight or slightly-curved blade designed both for cutting and thrusting. A large, enclosed guard shielded the swordsman’s hand.

from website History.naval.mil

Are you wondering just who “Jack Tar” might be? Here’s a bit of info:

Jack Tar (also JacktarJack-tar or Tar) is a common English term originally used to refer to seamen of the Merchant or Royal Navy, particularly during the period of the British Empire. By World War I the term was used as a nickname for those in the U.S. Navy. Members of the public and seafarers alike made use of the name in identifying those who went to sea. It was not used as a pejorative and sailors were happy to use the term to label themselves.

from Wikipedia
US Naval Cutlass (Civil War) and early 1900s Ceremonial Sword of Knights Templar
US Naval Cutlass on left – Ceremonial Sword of Knights Templar on right

There’s an interesting link from this cutlass to Havre de Grace via Commodore John Rodgers.

In 1808, Commodore John Rodgers of the Brooklyn Navy Yard awarded Nathan Starr a contract for 2,000 cutlasses at $2.50 each. This weapon was 35 ¼ inches long with a single-edged, straight blade. The guard was made of iron, beaten to concavity and lacquered black. The grip was a maple cylinder protected from splitting by two metal rings (ferrules) clamped around the handle near its upper and lower ends. In the hands of New England seamen, these cutlasses felled scores of Britons during bloody boarding actions in the War of 1812, including the capture by HMS Shannonof James Lawrence’s Chesapeake in 1813, and Wasp‘s victory over HMS Reindeer in 1814, one of the fiercest cutlass-fights in the annals of the sea.

from History.Naval.Mil

Rodgers Tavern (where Abbey’s Burger will open later this month) is connected to the Rodgers Family and their history with Havre de Grace. Here’s a tribute to Commodore Rodgers from Missouri Senator Thomas Hart Benton:

When I first saw Commodore Rodgers, which was after I had reached senatorial age and station, he recalled to me the idea of those modern admirals, and subsequent acquaintance confirmed the impression then made.

He was to me the complete impersonation of my idea of the perfect naval commander; person, mind and manners with the qualities of command grafted on the groundwork of a good citizen and good father of a family and all lodged in a frame to bespeak the seaman and officer. His very figure and face were those of the naval hero such as we conceive from naval songs and ballads and from the course of life which the sea officer leads exposed to the double peril of waves and war, contending with the storms of the elements as well as with the storm of battle. We associate the idea of bodily power with such a life, and when we find them united the heroic qualities in a frame of powerful muscular development, we experience a grateful feeling of completeness which fulfils a natural expectation and leaves nothing to be desired.

from War of 1812 Archaeology

Now you can see how easily you can get pulled into learning a bit of history while at the same time having fun!

Knights Templar Ceremonial Sword

There is a great deal of folklore and conspiracy theory when you speak of the Knights Templar of the Middle Ages. For an interesting read, consider this article10 Thinks You Never Knew About The Knights Templar by Dan Jones in the British Edition of GQ Magazine.

The sword with its scabbard is probably early 1900s. George is still researching it.

Here’s another photos of these two awesome antique pieces:

U.S. Naval Cutlass - Civil War period and Ceremonial Sword of Knights Templar.

We look forward to having you drop by and view these two pieces of history. Remember, George is the “Collector of Collections.” We’ll be watchin’ for ya to stop by so we can help you find your favorites!

Military DUI, Patches, and more

Bahoukas Antique Mall & Beer MuZeum has a military collection worth browsing. This recent collection includes a variety of DUI – Distinctive Unit Insignias including many from WWII, a Coast Guard Cap, Awards Ribbons, A Unit Patch (we have many more), a Cap Badge, and a Spec 5 Patch.

WWII Distinctive Unit Insignia
WWII Distinctive Unit Insignia
WWII Distinctive Unit Insignia
WWII Distinctive Unit Insignia

distinctive unit insignia (DUI) is a metal heraldic device worn by soldiers in the United States Army. The DUI design is derived from the coat of arms authorized for a unit. DUIs may also be called “distinctive insignia” (DI), a “crest” or a “unit crest” by soldiers or collectors. The term “crest” however, in addition to being incorrect, may be misleading, as a DUI is an insignia in its own right rather than a heraldic crest. The term “crest” properly refers to the portion of an achievement of arms which stands atop the helmet over the shield of arms. (Nevertheless, a minority of DUIs happen to depict crests, such as those of many National Guard state area commands.) The U.S. Army Institute of Heraldry is responsible for the design, development and authorization of all DUIs.

From Military Wikia
WWII Distinctive Unit Insignia
WWII Distinctive Unit Insignia
WWII Distinctive Unit Insignia
WWII Distinctive Unit Insignia
Unit Patch - blue star on white with red border - we have many more here at Bahoukas
Unit Patch – we have many more
Spec 5 Rank Patch
Spec 5 Rank Patch

Here’s a link to our Military Posts.

MILITARY LINK – Some of these items may no longer be available, but you’ll get a pretty good idea of the variety of Military Collectibles that we have. And we’re always receiving more.

Stop in over Havre de Grace’s Independence Weekend Celebrations and browse the shop. We’ll be watchin’ for ya. And just so you don’t miss out on anything, here’s the schedule of events!

Havre de Grace July 4 Weekend Events

Is PINK still popular?

IF IT’S PINK DEPRESSION GLASS – YES!

We absolutely love this collection. If, per chance, you don’t remember what Depression Glass is, here’s a bit of background:

Glassmakers couldn’t sustain through the Great Depression by providing the popular labor-intensive cut crystal glass of the 1920s to the upper class. Much like we’ve seen distilleries pivot to hand sanitizer and designers pivot to mask production during the COVID-19 pandemic, glass companies that once made luxury crystal were forced to reconsider their products. In an attempt to keep people employed, glass factories in the Ohio River Valley pivoted to mass-producing significantly cheaper molded, patterned glassware thanks to an innovative machine that could produce upwards of 1,000 pieces a day.

from Architectural Digest

We’ve just received this amazing collection of Pink Depression Glass – serving dishes to candy bowls.

This Pink Depression Glass Collection is exquisite!

Did you know there is a National Depression Glass Association?

Lovely Pink Depression Glass bowls and parfait dishes, goblets and pitchers.

What’s really exciting is that, according to this Architectural Digest article, the interest in collecting Pink Depression Glass (and others) could be gaining new interest.

This is just one “Collection of our many Collections! Stop in soon and browse Bahoukas Antique Mall and Beer MuZeum. Yes, we’re watchin’ for ya!