Military Memorabilia 2

Canteens – Belts – Binoculars – Photos

We have an intriguing variety of Military Memorabilia that includes canteens, binoculars, photos, pictures, caps, leather bags, and more. If you’re a collector, you just might want to stop in and browse.

military binoculars - canteen - caps - music

We have some music albums, and even a set of leather bags, airplane model, and more.

Military memorabilia - airplane model - photos - books - music
Military hats - caps - photos - leather bags

Click this link for more Military Memorabilia

Please remember to take a moment to be still and honor the brave men and women who gave their lives for their country! Be safe in your travels. Remember – we’re here and we’re watchin’ for ya. We look forward to seeing you this weekend.

Military Memorabilia

In Observance of Memorial Day

In keeping with this week’s theme, today’s post includes a few photos of various US Military Memorabilita.

US Military Memorabilia includes, letters, medals, glasses, photos, and more
Military Memorabilia available at Bahoukas Antiques in Havre de Grace

We have photos, medals, newspaper articles, and various military pieces that may be of interest to the collector. Stop in and browse.

Plates, photos, posters, military memorabilia
Lighter, mess kit, ashtray, photos, books, belt, medals and more Military Memorabilia

We’re here and YES…

We’re watchin’ for ya. Hurry in and see our Military Collectibles. Remember those we’ve lost by observing a moment of prayer.

Remembering Those We’ve Lost

Military Books and Magazines

To start off our Memorial Day Observances here at Bahoukas Antique Mall, we will share a few of the books and magazines related to U.S. Wars and Military Stories, Articles, and more. We also have a number of Life Magazines that cover a variety of military events and stories.

You are encouraged to stop by and browse, not only our books but our vintage Military pieces. We’ll be sharing more over the next few days. Of course, we’re always watchin’ for ya!

Antique Mystery

Sterling silver ?

5-3/4 ” and telescopes to 9-1/4″

This whoZwhatsits is sterling silver, from the 1890s, and is part of the Stirer Estate (which we’ll be sharing soon).

Have you guessed yet?

This is a holder for opera glasses. It’s in amazing condition. And we had to really search to find out what it was. Then to learn that it telescoped as well – WOW!

As you can see, we always have fun with our ‘discoveries’ and encourage you to stop in soon. Discover your favorites at Bahoukas Antiques. And you know, we’re always watchin’ for ya!

Mother’s Day Finale

Yes, it’s raining… but we’re here!

It’s our final suggestion from our many collections in our shop. Just a few samplings to give you help with your last-minute shopping for Mom.

Elvis?

Elvis Collectible

Many older moms loved Elvis. Would your mom love an Elvis Collectible? We have a great assortment for you to choose from.

Jewelry?

We have a huge selection of jewelry – reasonable costume jewelry to some fine gold and silver pieces. Are the kids looking to find something special? Stop by and browse our aisles!

Dishware and more…

There’s no way we can show you all the dishware pieces that we have in the shop. But if you’re looking for just a special piece, we’ll help you find it.

Knives-Forks-Spoons-oh my!

Silverware service

This is just one example of our collection of silverware. This is a beautiful set.

Cast Iron Cookware

cast iron cookware

We have a collection of cast iron pans, kettles, and more. Would mom appreciate one of them? Stop by soon…

Hats

Okay, so this is veering a bit from cookware… but hey, we never know what YOUR MOM might like.

Oil Lamps?

Oil Lamps

These are just 3 of hundreds of oil lamps available in our shop! You’ll be so surprised to see the variety we offer.

…and even more variety of choice

We’re Here…

and we’re watchin’ for ya. We even have umbrellas should you need one! In the meantime, let us help you with your last-minute gift for MOM!

Why Collect Vintage Cameras

Why do people collect cameras with no intention of using them? Okay, maybe that’s a little unfair. Some collectors do enjoy using their vintage cameras. But for most collectors, buying classic and antique cameras is more about the joy of owning and admiring something special and different, while researching and learning about its place in the history of photography.

from AmateurPhotographer

Collections as Unique as the Collectors

Here, at Bahoukas Antiques, we’ve had a wide variety of collectible and vintage cameras over the years. We also have a number of folks who check back every year or so to see what new items we’ve collected. Those collectors range from the ones who love the ‘look’ and have special displays in their homes or offices, while others actually use them.

Vintage Camera

This 4×5 Graphic VIEW camera is intriguing and beautiful. Stop by to see this as well as a variety of other collectible and vintage cameras in our shop.

variety of collectible and vintage cameras at Bahoukas Antiques
variety of collectible and vintage cameras

Looking for Film?

Do you wonder where in the world you might purchase film for an old camera? Worry no more. Chat with George and he can help or read an article from ExpertPhotography.

Stop by today and browse the shop. We’re here and, yessirree, we’re watchin’ for ya!

Roosters, Flying Pigs, Gargoyles and more

Cast-Iron is Beautiful for More Than Pans

This beautifully painted rooster sits atop a large dinner bell that needs to be mounted to a wall. It’s an absolutely gorgeous piece.

cast iron dinner bell topped with a white flying pig
Beautiful cast iron horse tops this large dinner bell

Cast-Iron Figures for every decor!

We have an eclectic assortment of cast-iron figures (old and new), bottle openers, door knockers, and cast-iron mechanical banks.

These are just a few samplings. From lobsters to ladybugs, mermaids to Michelin men, flying pigs to turtles, well, you’ll just have to come and see for yourself. We’re sure you’ll find the perfect addition to your collection or for your decorating idea. Yep, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

1906 Wagon and 1960s Nail Barrel

Hunt, Helm, Ferris and Co

This amazing 1906 Star Coaster wagon is approximately 40″ in length with spoked, cast iron wheels. It’s a beautiful piece that we believe may have more recently been painted black. Come see this piece. It’s in our front display window. And it’s a beauty!

Beautiful Wooden Nail Keg

In excellent condition, this beautiful wooden nail keg is 18″ in diameter and 29″ tall with metal hoops. We believe it’s from the 1960s. You can see it in our front display window sitting on the beautiful Star Coaster Wagon.

wooden nail keg - 18" diameter x29" tall - with metal hoops

These two pieces are in excellent condition. Surely, you have the perfect location and use for one or both. Stop in soon to view them. Chat with George. You know we’re watchin’ for ya!

Spring Is Synonymous With Motorcycles!

Here at Bahoukas we’ve discovered some interesting and exciting items. In this post, we’ll share a number of pieces that may be of interest to anyone who loves motorcycles. You know who you are.

Pre-1930s Willson Goggles

pre-1930s Willson goggles with metal case
pre-1930s Willson Goggles with metal case

This pair of Willson Goggles is in brand new condition and nestled in a metal case. They are pre-1930s. The photo below shows the printed piece inside the case.

info inside case of Willson Goggles - pre-1930s

If you want to learn more about Willson Goggles, check out their website at Goggleworks. And YES, you can visit their museum and art studios. All of this is located in Reading, PA. WOW! The things we learn.

ADVERTISING related to motorcycles

motorcycle advertising from 50s and 60s
Advertising for Buco helmets, BSA motorcycles, and Triumph Motorcycles from the 1950s

Ephemera collections can include advertising brochures for those who collect all things motorcycles. You’ll want to see some of the items we acquired.

1963 BMW News - motorcycle
BMW News brochure – 1963 – for motorcycles

Do you remember the Indian Motorcycle?

from Indian Motorcycle

Spirit Lake Experience Center and Factory Tour

For a more immersive view of Indian Motorcycle, visit the Indian Motorcycle Experience Center, attached to the Indian Motorcycle factory in Spirit Lake, Iowa. The center showcases current and historic Indian motorcycles, displays vintage artifacts and memorabilia, and offers visitors the opportunity to purchase exclusive factory merchandise. Visitors are also able to view a short video tour of the manufacturing facility during times when guided tours are unavailable. Guests are welcome to visit the Indian Motorcycle Experience Center anytime Monday-Friday between the hours of 8:00am and 3:00pm(CST) with the exception of holidays.

from Indian Motorcycle
Indian Motorcycle Brochure - 1950s?
Indian Motorcycle Brochure – 1950s?
Paul Goldsmith on the Souvenir Program of the National Championship of the AMA Motorcycle Races

Who is Paul Goldsmith?

Paul Goldsmith is a former USAC and NASCAR driver. He is an inductee of the Motorcycle Hall of Fame, the Motorsports Hall of Fame of America, and the USAC Hall of Fame. Later in life Goldsmith became a pilot and, flying primarily a Cessna 421, transported engines and parts to and from races. 

from Wikipedia

Stop by and take a peek at these amazing collectibles related to motorcycling. Yep, we’re here and we’re watchin’ for ya!

Looking for A New Collection? Bossons Maybe?

BOSSONS – THE FACES THAT LAUNCHED A THOUSAND COLLECTIONS

Bossons is the name given to an extraordinary collection of character wall masks, figurines, shelf ornaments, animal studies, wall plaques, lamp bases, bookends, wall clocks, thermometers, barometers, pottery figures and mirrors that were produced by the W. H. Bossons Company of Congleton, England between 1948 and 1996. The brainchild of a talented father and son team, they have become highly sought after works of art all around the world, but especially in the USA and England. 

from Bossons.com
Bosson Chalk Heads - 2
Bosson Chalk Heads

Talk about a small business with a quality of excellence!

Ray Bossons was an extremely talented artist with an intuitive ability to anticipate market trends. He was a perfectionist with regard to the anatomical detail, artistic excellence and historical accuracy of each item of art the company created. He was the creative genius and without question, the designer extraordinaire of the W. H. Bossons companies following the death of his father, W. H. Bossons in 1951. The company’s reputation spread within a comparatively short period of time to all the principal markets of the world. Most of the original ideas and basic concepts came from Ray Bossons fertile imagination. He would sketch the ideas for the wall masks and figurines after much research on each character to be portrayed and relied on his extensive library for research material. The original models were executed in clay by highly talented sculptors with no limit set on the time it took to create an original model.* Ray Bossons would set the standards for the pieces and then turn them over to the staff of painters to complete.

from Bossons.com
*italics by post author

This unique selection of Bosson Chalk Heads can be a perfect start to a new collection. Stop in and see them for yourself. We’re here and we’re watchin’ for ya.

UPDATE: Yes, we WILL be open on New Year’s Day!

Unique Jacks

This selection of jacks is pretty unique. The center one is a train jack, the outside ones are car jacks.

Vintage Train Jack
vintage car jack
Vintage Car Jack
vintage car jack
Vintage Car Jack

These are certainly unique to our shop. Have someone on your gift list that just might be looking for one of these. Stop in today and pick it up. In the meantime, check out the great restoration in the video below. Beautiful!

All of Us at Bahoukas wish you a safe and wonderful Holiday!

Remember, we’re closed on Christmas Day and New Years Day. Give us a call if you’re stopping by Christmas Eve or New Year’s Eve to be sure we didn’t sneak out early! Yeah, we like to celebrate, too. And yes, we’re watchin’ for ya. So hurry in!

Lunch Boxes and School Desks

A bit of Lunch Box History

Dads carried metal tins with lunch to their jobs in the coal mines and factories. Of course, it wasn’t long before their children wanted to copy their dads.

… the first commercial lunch boxes, which resembled metal picnic baskets decorated with scenes of playing children, came out in 1902.

from Smithsonian Magazine

The first lunch box decorated with a famous licensed character was introduced in 1935. Produced by Geuder, Paeschke & Frey, it featured Mickey Mouse, and was a four-color lithographed oval tin, with a pull-out tray inside. It had no vacuum bottle, but did have a handle.

In 1950, Aladdin Industries created the first children’s lunch box based on a television show, Hopalong Cassidy. The Hopalong Cassidy lunch kit, or “Hoppy”, quickly became Aladdin’s cash cow. Debuting in time for back-to-school 1950, it would go on to sell 600,000 units in its first year alone, each at US$2.39. In 1953, Roy Rogers and Dale Evans were featured on models introduced by American Thermos.

from Wikipedia
lunch boxes of metal and plastic at Bahoukas
Huge collection of decorated lunchboxes in plastic and metal

Many of the latest additions are complete with thermoses as well. Do stop in and check it out. They are a great last-minute gift for a child in your life – or your favorite collector. Remember, not just great for lunch, but fun for picnics, playing, keeping treasures, and more.

School Desks

Wooden school desk, cast iron base, lid lifts to a cubby for storing paper and books
Beautiful wooden and cast iron school desk.

The above desk is in beautiful condition. We also have another as pictured below:

wood school desk with cast iron base, lid lifts up for a cubby that can hold books and papers
Another beautiful wood school desk.

Another choice is this wood desk:

The front of the desk had the bench for the desk that sat in front of it

1881: The Fashion School Desk

The First Model

The first school desk was made in 1880 by John D. Loughlin in Sidney, Ohio. The desk, known as “The Fashion Desk,” proved to be extremely popular across the country. The practicality of the desks allowed for many to be put together in a one room schoolhouse, and the fashion aspect of it was aesthetically pleasing to those in the education industry. Loughlin’s marketing campaign also helped to sell these desks, which would eventually sweep the nation. The “Fashion Desks” were desks attached to one another and were big enough to seat two or three children. Usually, there was an inkwell so that the student could replenish his pen’s supply.

from TheClassroom.com

The Sidney School Furniture Company, located in Sidney, Ohio, began manufacturing the popular “Fashion” school desk in 1881. Advertising for the desk claimed, “No desk in the market is made with more care, nor of better materials than the ‘Fashion,’ and none has met with a more popular reception, or gives better satisfaction.” The desk featured a Patent T-head, which eliminated screws and bolts by joining the wood of the top, back, and seat to the legs, which were made of cast iron.

from EdTechMagazine.com
old wooden school chair with writing pad

Old School Chair

… with writing pad. These are solid and have a shelf on the bottom to place books and bags.

So whether it’s a lunchbox or a school desk, we can add a last-minute ‘surprise’ to your holiday gift-giving. Hurry in. We’re watchin’ for ya so that we can help you with your last-minute searches. Don’t forget, we DO CLOSE for Christmas Day and New Years Day. (Give us a call to be sure we didn’t leave early on the eve of both!) Happy Holidays!

Do You Love Manual Typewriters?

The above photo is a 1910 Oliver Typewriter available in our store. Here’s a great quote from a collector’s website:

Towards the end of the nineteenth century, the typewriter industry was developing rapidly. Before the Oliver typewriter entered the market, text remained hidden from the typist on the underside of the platen as it was typeset until the platen was lifted. This design was convention across many successful typewriter brands of the era. However, the typewriting industry was soon revolutionized by Reverend Thomas Oliver and his eponymous invention. The Oliver typewriter features two towers of typebars which strike down onto the platen, allowing the text to remain visible at all times. With this iconic typing mechanism, the Oliver become known as The Standard Visible Writer.

from Olivertypewriters.com

History of Manual Typewriters

The history of manual typewriters began in 1575, when an Italian printmaker, Francesco Rampazetto, invented a machine to impress letters on papers. Not until 1714 did a Brit named Henry Mill take out a patent for a machine similar to a typewriter. 

from Writers-Alliance.org

It was until 1874 that these typewriters were commercially introduced to Europe and America. By the early 1900s, the electric typewriter would hit the market.

Tom Thumb Cash Registers and Typewriter

Did you ever get one of these for a Christmas gift? The cash registers came first to be followed in 1953 with the Tom Thumb Typewriter.

Tom Thumb toy typewriter by Western Stamping Co
Tom Thumb toy typewriter by Western Stamping Co.

It was the beginning of the glory days of the durable metal Tom Thumb toy cash register, manufactured exclusively at Western Stamping Co., 2203 W. Michigan Ave.

“I bet they made 600,000 of those cash registers a year for at least 10 years,” said Edna Whiting, 86, of Blackman Township, daughter of Arthur Poole, a company founder.

… The toy cash register’s keys were first attached one at a time. By 1953, they were attached in one process, which upped production and enabled the company to produce half a million cash registers and 100,000 typewriters that year.

from Peek Through Time: Toys fom Western Stamping
Royal manual typewriter 1963
1963 Royal Manual Typewriter

Royal Typewriters

Many of us “boomers” probably remember the heavy black Royal typewriter. They seemed to last FOREVER! This interesting quote may help explain why:

To promote the ruggedness of its typewriters, George Edward Smith, president of Royal bought a Ford-Stout tri-motor airplane in August 1927. This plane will drop over 200 typewriters in crates with parachutes to dealers over the eastern seaboard of the USA. Royal will eventually deliver over 11,000 this way with only 10 being damaged.

from Royal.com

WOW! That’s quite a promotion!!!

Writers and Their Typewriters

Many famous writers used their typewriters, often long after the computer arrived.

Author Will Self explains why writers use a manual typewriter: “I think the computer user does their thinking on the screen, and the non-computer user is compelled, because he or she has to retype a whole text, to do a lot more thinking in the head.”

from Writers Alliance

In 1883, Mark Twain was the first to present his ‘typewritten manuscript” to a publisher. The book? Life on the Mississippi

And did you know that J.R.R. Tolkein typed and retyped his Lord of the Rings manually on a typewriter? Jack Kerouac was a speed typist at 100 words per minute!

Read more about writers and the typewriters in the link in the above post.

No matter what the reason: you love to type on a manual typewriter, you’re fascinated by the mechanics themselves, or you’re a collector! Stop by and browse our collection of typewriters. We’re here and we most certainly are watchin’ for ya!

Hand Saws – a useful tool

Carpentry is a skill that came into being when mankind first decided to build, and crude tools were fashioned to help in the process. While early tools were rough, as time went by, the necessity of having better saws led to the more refined handsaw.

from HomeSteady.com

Vintage Hand Saws

We have a variety of hand saws available in the store that can be sharpened and used or appreciated as a decorative item for a home or shop. (Yes, there are ice tongs in this photo – chuckle – you can read about them in an earlier post).

Paintings

… show saws in use as early as Egyptian times! These saws were made of copper and are depicted as a large blade with no handle.

from WonkeeDonkeeTools.co.uk

From cutting trees to building homes…

The hand saw gave mankind the ability to keep warm, cook food, and build homes, barns, churches, and business structures. It’s another tool that we take for granted but was key to our development. Of course, today we have all sorts of electric saws. But we could still build with the hand saw even if we lost ‘the grid.’

By the 1800s, handsaws could be found in almost every home and were used to cut wood for fires as well as building. Various manufacturers such as Sheffield and Cam produced different styles and sizes for different uses, with both flat rectangular edges and sloped rounded end designs. Handles varied as well, some with an opening and others that closed about the hand. Often companies engraved their name across the metal or created fancy curved handles.

from WonkeeDonkeeTools.co.uk

Because of its versatility, the handsaw is still an important tool for carpenters and woodworkers today. Today’s models look very much as they did back in the 18th century, but there are significant differences. Handsaws often have plastic handles and removable blades. The metals are often made to be rust resistant; and they can be thicker or multi-bladed for faster cutting. Some models are able to cut through glass, veneer and even metal.

from HomeSteady.com

Whether you’re a prepper looking for a useful tool, someone who loves decorating with vintage tools, a collector, or a woodworker that appreciates the vintage tools, we invite you to stop in and see what we have. Of course, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Ice for Your Icebox!

The tools pictured are ice tongs and ice saw used to cut blocks of ice from the Susquehanna River when it froze thick enough – ideally 8″ thick! It was hard work. The blocks of ice at 8″ thick would average 2.67 cubic feet and weigh about 150 lbs (considered manageable weight)! This info is included in the book: Heavy Industries of Yesteryear, Harford County’s Rural Heritage, by Jack L. Shagena, Jr. and Henry C. Peden, Jr. (available in our store).

book cover for Heavy Industries of Yesteryear, Harford County's Rural Heritage
Excerpt about ice-harvesting from the book, Heavy Industries of Yesteryear, Harford County's Rural Heritage

Why did we need ice blocks?

1920s icebox

Into the 1930s, households used large blocks of ice to keep food cold in “iceboxes.”

This photo is from the 1920s. Courtesy of the Sloane Collection.

By the end of the 1800s, many American households stored their perishable food in an insulated “icebox” that was usually made of wood and lined with tin or zinc. A large block of ice was stored inside to keep these early refrigerators chilly. By this point, cold had become the clear choice among food preservation methods, proving less labor-intensive and more effective at preventing spoilage. Other techniques, like salting, drying, and canning, erased any appearance of freshness and required more time to prepare. Iceboxes also presented a new way to save prepared foods—or leftovers—that previously might not have lasted beyond one meal.

from AmericanHistory.si.edu

Abbott Bros Ice House

Photo of Abbott Bros Ice House

The above photo is of Abbott Bros Ice House, located where the Havre de Grace Marine Center is on Water Street in Havre de Grace.

For the local history lover on your holiday gift list, at least one of the items featured, the book, and the Abbott Bros Ice House photo (available at Bahoukas) would make an awesome addition to their collection. Talk to George today.

In the meantime, hurry in to find YOUR favorite items for someone on your gift list. And yes, we’re definitely watchin’ for ya!

Tools for the Season

These cast iron kettles are a size 4 and 8. The larger is a Jos Bell & Co.

Heat On? Fireplaces Working?

It’s the season where we begin to crank up the heat. Along with the warm and cozy fireplaces and pellet stoves or even just the welcome heat from your furnace, dry air starts to affect our comfort. Many folks love to put a kettle of water on the stove and let it add a bit of humidity to create a more comfortable – and healthy – home!

These two kettles are definitely up to the task. Come see them for yourself. We also have a number of other cast iron items waiting for you to consider.

Might You Be A Hunter?

Electric Wellsaw model 400 for cutting meat – from the 1950s

Along with cooler temps, it’s also hunting season. This 1950 Wellsaw model 400 electric saw is for cutting meat. It does work.

You know, here at Bahoukas Antique Mall and Beer MuZeum, you just never know what our ‘collector of collections’ might have in the shop. So hurry in and enjoy a look back while considering how you might use these very collections to make your life forward a bit easier or more fun.

Yep, we’re here – ready to help you find the most unique of holiday gifts. And we’re watchin’ for ya!

Vintage Christmas Santas

Wishing you a Happy Thanksgiving!

Everyone at Bahoukas Antique Mall and Beer MuZeum wishes you a Happy Thanksgiving, hopefully, shared with family and friends. PLEASE NOTE that we are CLOSED for Thanksgiving Day to enjoy our own families and to appreciate all that we’ve been given. Regular hours will return tomorrow and we’ll be open 7 days/week until Christmas Day!

We know that as soon as this holiday is over, folks will be “full steam ahead” for holiday decorating and gift-giving ideas. The above photo gives you a peek at our latest addition to our vintage holiday decorations – beautiful Vintage Santas!

Santa’s Kaleidoscope – collectible figural glass ornaments

Glass Ornaments

These beautiful very collectible, figural glass ornaments are beautiful. The set, from Santa’s Kaleidoscope, is waiting for just the right home to add a bit of pizzazz to your holiday decor!

Vintage Christmas Decor

Vintage Christmas Decorations

Here’s a sampling of more vintage and very collectible decorations to add a bit of whimsy to your holiday decor. Hurry in. These items tend to go quickly. And yes, we’re watchin’ for ya and are ready to point you in the right direction!

Again, Happy Thanksgiving. Safe travels. Always be grateful!

Collectible Lighters and Ashtrays

Whether or not you smoke, ashtrays are appealing collectibles for numerous reasons.

First, they are small, which means you can acquire hundreds of ashtrays and display them in a relatively finite amount of space.

Second, they were made out of a wide range of materials, so if you are a fan of art glass, pounded copper, or ceramics, there is bound to be an ashtray for you.

Third, ashtrays were produced during some of the most creative periods in history, which means there are ashtrays for fans of the Victorian era, Arts and Crafts, and Art Deco.

Finally, ashtrays are snapshots of their culture, so it is not uncommon to find ashtrays that were produced to advertise products and events of the day.

from Collector’s Weekly

Ashtrays

variety of collectible ashtrays
Ashtrays came in all styles – silly to beautifully designed, touristy and promotional.

To show you just how diverse ashtray collections can be, here we show you a German Spinner by Gerzt (top center), the resting Mexican (made in Japan), the promotional ashtray from PENROSE, and the horse’s ‘arse’. Yep, something for everyone!

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

Did you know that ashtrays are a design element included in the Cooper Hewitt Museum, located in the Andrew Carnegie Mansion on Fifth Avenue, NYC? We sure wish we had one of these in our collection!

Russel Wright designed ashtray

… is displayed at the Cooper Hewitt

Preserving the natural qualities of ceramics in spite of the dominance of machine-produced pottery has been a challenge for designers since the introduction of machinery to the production process in the eighteenth century.

Russel Wright addressed this design dilemma through his biomorphic earthenware. This ashtray, part of a 1949 series manufactured by Sterling China for hotels and restaurants, embodies Wright’s idea of designing machine-made ceramics that simulate their handcrafted counterparts. Flaring up and out from its low base, the ashtray has a curved, asymmetrical rim that appears as though it was pinched and folded by hand. Although entirely molded by machine, the ashtray’s profile suggests the involvement of human contact throughout its production. The organic form also makes the ashtray user-friendly and invites human contact and interactions: the undulating rim is excellent for resting cigarettes, and the groove holds a matchbook perfectly. The groove also allowed restaurant workers to stack multiple ashtrays, the base of one fitting neatly into the ashtray below.

from Cooper Hewitt

Lighters

Do you ever wonder who invented the first lighter? No, it wasn’t the Zippo Company, though they certainly improved on it! The first was invented in 1823. The Zippo didn’t come into the picture until 1932.

Johann Wolfgang Döbereiner invented the first lighter known as “Döbereiner’s Lamp.” It looked nothing like the lighters we use today and was also difficult to use and extremely dangerous.

from Quality Logo Products
Variety of tabletop novelty lighters: military shell, Zippo, and cigarette case with lighter

The above lighters can be found in our shop and include: Top left: a cigarette case with lighter, a Queen Anne style lighter, a novelty grenade, military shell, and card cube, a Zippo lighter, and a rather art deco looking styled tabletop lighter.

So if you, or someone you know, has a collection of lighters and/or ashtrays, you just might want to check our collection. We’re here. And we’re watchin’ for ya!