Bottles, Bottles, Bottles

It’s been a while since we’ve shared our variety of bottle collections. An old bottle is a great way to upcycle – use to keep pens, show off a small bouquet or a single flower, or just add to a windowsill with a sprig of ivy. Check out just a few of our collections in the store.

Milk Bottles

scores of collectible milk bottles at Bahoukas Antique Mall in Havre de Grace
A great collection of milk bottles
Close up of a few collectible milk bottles at Bahoukas
Milk Bottle Sampler

Medicine Bottles

Do you love flowers? Well, our collection of bottles can give you beautiful cut flower containers. Consider these for a bud face or simple flower:

Shades of blue and clear glass bottles - beautiful on a window sill - Bahoukas in Havre de Grace
pharmaceutical bottles

CLICK ON OUR BOTTLES category (on the right side of our page) to see more complete posts about our many bottles available.

Vintage Bottles

vintage bottles including torpedo, igloo ink, blob top, crown top, and a clay Weiss Beer bottle - all available at Bahoukas Antiques in Havre de Grace, MD
Unique vintage bottles

Whether you have a windowsill filled with tiny bottles or a cabinet filled with your collection, we encourage you to stop into Bahoukas Antique Mall to see if one – or a dozen – might add to your collection or to your decor!

Absolutely, we will be watchin’ for ya!

“Cheese,” Pinholes, and Cameras

No, we’re not talking food – but cameras!

Yes, we’re living in a world full of selfies. Smiles that are so practiced that we’ve nearly forgotten what a great, spontaneous smile actually looks like. But stop by our shop for a great history of photography as you browse our vintage camera collection.

Over the past year or so, here at Bahoukas Antique Mall, we’ve acquired a surprising variety of antique, vintage, and collectible cameras. Whether you’re a photographer who loves to collect vintage cameras or someone who just loves how they look as unique decorating items in your home or office, we have a wonderful selection to choose from.

In researching the collecting of cameras, we found this most informative blog post on “How to Start a Camera Collection” from the blog Amateur Photographer. CLICK HERE to read a great post and maybe tickle your ‘collector self’ into considering a small camera collection.

Vintage cameras available at Bahoukas Antiques
Wonderful variety of vintage cameras at Bahoukas!

Here’s a short video that gives you a bit of camera history as well as the joy of collecting.

Did You Ever Make A Pinhole Camera?

Many can remember, as a kid, making a pinhole camera from an old shoebox. Did you ever do that? Have you shared that with your kids or grandkids. In today’s busy, techie world, it might be fun to share this simple project with a youngster in your life while teaching them a bit about how our eye and brain work to give us our vision and the pinhole camera is a great example.

Vintage Fun

Stop in today and browse our wonderful variety of cameras. Add to or start your collection today!

Of course, as always, we’ll be watchin’ for ya. Stop by and say ‘hello’ and share your favorite collectibles! You might just discover an addition that “you’ll just have to purchase!” See you soon!

Recycle-Repurpose-Kitchen Utensils

Are you serious about reusing items to keep them out of landfills? Many items in antique stores, besides adding to a collection or being a wonderful decorating item, are also quite useful.

Kitchen Utensils to Repurpose!

Look at this photo of one wall of kitchen items that could easily enjoy another few years of purpose.

Just one wall of great kitchen utensils that could be used today!
Rolling pins from days of yore available at Bahoukas

We also have

… rolling pins, cake dishes, pie tins, and cast iron pans to name just a few easily repurposed.

So many great ideas…

Cast iron pans

It’s well worth a visit to Bahoukas Antique Mall to see if we might have ‘just the item you need.’ If you need a link for other ideas, CLICK HERE. You’ll find dozens of items you probably never would think to look for at Bahoukas. Of course, we’re always watchin’ for ya!

US Navy Cutlass – Knights Templar Sword

These two antique pieces arrived recently. We’re excited to share them with you.

Civil War Naval Cutlass

First, let’s share a little background regarding this Naval Cutlass:

First cousin to the longer, lighter cavalry saber, the naval cutlass was designed for sea-fighting as the saber was adapted to land-battles. Because boarding actions were fought on the crowded decks of small vessels amid tangles of shrouds and splintered spars and struggling shipmates and foemen, Jack Tar’s blade had to be short for easy control, and heavy enough to provide its own momentum in slashing. (Unlike the cavalry trooper’s trusty saber, Jack’s cutlass did not have the weight of a galloping horse behind it!) The cutlass had a straight or slightly-curved blade designed both for cutting and thrusting. A large, enclosed guard shielded the swordsman’s hand.

from website History.naval.mil

Are you wondering just who “Jack Tar” might be? Here’s a bit of info:

Jack Tar (also JacktarJack-tar or Tar) is a common English term originally used to refer to seamen of the Merchant or Royal Navy, particularly during the period of the British Empire. By World War I the term was used as a nickname for those in the U.S. Navy. Members of the public and seafarers alike made use of the name in identifying those who went to sea. It was not used as a pejorative and sailors were happy to use the term to label themselves.

from Wikipedia
US Naval Cutlass (Civil War) and early 1900s Ceremonial Sword of Knights Templar
US Naval Cutlass on left – Ceremonial Sword of Knights Templar on right

There’s an interesting link from this cutlass to Havre de Grace via Commodore John Rodgers.

In 1808, Commodore John Rodgers of the Brooklyn Navy Yard awarded Nathan Starr a contract for 2,000 cutlasses at $2.50 each. This weapon was 35 ¼ inches long with a single-edged, straight blade. The guard was made of iron, beaten to concavity and lacquered black. The grip was a maple cylinder protected from splitting by two metal rings (ferrules) clamped around the handle near its upper and lower ends. In the hands of New England seamen, these cutlasses felled scores of Britons during bloody boarding actions in the War of 1812, including the capture by HMS Shannonof James Lawrence’s Chesapeake in 1813, and Wasp‘s victory over HMS Reindeer in 1814, one of the fiercest cutlass-fights in the annals of the sea.

from History.Naval.Mil

Rodgers Tavern (where Abbey’s Burger will open later this month) is connected to the Rodgers Family and their history with Havre de Grace. Here’s a tribute to Commodore Rodgers from Missouri Senator Thomas Hart Benton:

When I first saw Commodore Rodgers, which was after I had reached senatorial age and station, he recalled to me the idea of those modern admirals, and subsequent acquaintance confirmed the impression then made.

He was to me the complete impersonation of my idea of the perfect naval commander; person, mind and manners with the qualities of command grafted on the groundwork of a good citizen and good father of a family and all lodged in a frame to bespeak the seaman and officer. His very figure and face were those of the naval hero such as we conceive from naval songs and ballads and from the course of life which the sea officer leads exposed to the double peril of waves and war, contending with the storms of the elements as well as with the storm of battle. We associate the idea of bodily power with such a life, and when we find them united the heroic qualities in a frame of powerful muscular development, we experience a grateful feeling of completeness which fulfils a natural expectation and leaves nothing to be desired.

from War of 1812 Archaeology

Now you can see how easily you can get pulled into learning a bit of history while at the same time having fun!

Knights Templar Ceremonial Sword

There is a great deal of folklore and conspiracy theory when you speak of the Knights Templar of the Middle Ages. For an interesting read, consider this article10 Thinks You Never Knew About The Knights Templar by Dan Jones in the British Edition of GQ Magazine.

The sword with its scabbard is probably early 1900s. George is still researching it.

Here’s another photos of these two awesome antique pieces:

U.S. Naval Cutlass - Civil War period and Ceremonial Sword of Knights Templar.

We look forward to having you drop by and view these two pieces of history. Remember, George is the “Collector of Collections.” We’ll be watchin’ for ya to stop by so we can help you find your favorites!

Military DUI, Patches, and more

Bahoukas Antique Mall & Beer MuZeum has a military collection worth browsing. This recent collection includes a variety of DUI – Distinctive Unit Insignias including many from WWII, a Coast Guard Cap, Awards Ribbons, A Unit Patch (we have many more), a Cap Badge, and a Spec 5 Patch.

WWII Distinctive Unit Insignia
WWII Distinctive Unit Insignia
WWII Distinctive Unit Insignia
WWII Distinctive Unit Insignia

distinctive unit insignia (DUI) is a metal heraldic device worn by soldiers in the United States Army. The DUI design is derived from the coat of arms authorized for a unit. DUIs may also be called “distinctive insignia” (DI), a “crest” or a “unit crest” by soldiers or collectors. The term “crest” however, in addition to being incorrect, may be misleading, as a DUI is an insignia in its own right rather than a heraldic crest. The term “crest” properly refers to the portion of an achievement of arms which stands atop the helmet over the shield of arms. (Nevertheless, a minority of DUIs happen to depict crests, such as those of many National Guard state area commands.) The U.S. Army Institute of Heraldry is responsible for the design, development and authorization of all DUIs.

From Military Wikia
WWII Distinctive Unit Insignia
WWII Distinctive Unit Insignia
WWII Distinctive Unit Insignia
WWII Distinctive Unit Insignia
Unit Patch - blue star on white with red border - we have many more here at Bahoukas
Unit Patch – we have many more
Spec 5 Rank Patch
Spec 5 Rank Patch

Here’s a link to our Military Posts.

MILITARY LINK – Some of these items may no longer be available, but you’ll get a pretty good idea of the variety of Military Collectibles that we have. And we’re always receiving more.

Stop in over Havre de Grace’s Independence Weekend Celebrations and browse the shop. We’ll be watchin’ for ya. And just so you don’t miss out on anything, here’s the schedule of events!

Havre de Grace July 4 Weekend Events

Is PINK still popular?

IF IT’S PINK DEPRESSION GLASS – YES!

We absolutely love this collection. If, per chance, you don’t remember what Depression Glass is, here’s a bit of background:

Glassmakers couldn’t sustain through the Great Depression by providing the popular labor-intensive cut crystal glass of the 1920s to the upper class. Much like we’ve seen distilleries pivot to hand sanitizer and designers pivot to mask production during the COVID-19 pandemic, glass companies that once made luxury crystal were forced to reconsider their products. In an attempt to keep people employed, glass factories in the Ohio River Valley pivoted to mass-producing significantly cheaper molded, patterned glassware thanks to an innovative machine that could produce upwards of 1,000 pieces a day.

from Architectural Digest

We’ve just received this amazing collection of Pink Depression Glass – serving dishes to candy bowls.

This Pink Depression Glass Collection is exquisite!

Did you know there is a National Depression Glass Association?

Lovely Pink Depression Glass bowls and parfait dishes, goblets and pitchers.

What’s really exciting is that, according to this Architectural Digest article, the interest in collecting Pink Depression Glass (and others) could be gaining new interest.

This is just one “Collection of our many Collections! Stop in soon and browse Bahoukas Antique Mall and Beer MuZeum. Yes, we’re watchin’ for ya!

Harper’s Pictorial History – Civil War

The latest addition to our Military and Civil War Antiques and Collectibles are about 20 issues of Harper’s Weekly Magazine from the 1860s.

Harper’s Weekly was the most widely read journal in the United States throughout the period of the Civil War. So as not to upset its wide readership in the South, Harper’s took a moderate editorial position on the issue of slavery prior to the outbreak of the war. Publications that supported abolition referred to it as “Harper’s Weakly”. The Weekly had supported the Stephen A. Douglas presidential campaign against Abraham Lincoln, but as the American Civil War broke out, it fully supported Lincoln and the Union. A July 1863 article on the escaped slave Gordon included a photograph of his back, severely scarred from whippings; this provided many readers in the North their first visual evidence of the brutality of slavery. The photograph inspired many free blacks in the North to enlist.

Some of the most important articles and illustrations of the time were Harper’s reporting on the war. Besides renderings by Homer and Nast, the magazine also published illustrations by Theodore R. Davis, Henry Mosler, and the brothers Alfred and William Waud.

from Wikipedia

Political Cartoonist: Thomas Nast

Thomas Nast, legendary for his political cartoons in Harper’s, also cemented our present image of Santa Claus.
CLICK HERE for his story. It’s a most interesting read.

Thomas Nast cemented our present-day image of Santa Claus

Remember, Sunday is Father’s Day – June 20, 2021

From antiques and collectibles, games and videos, to our amazing Beer MuZeum, there’s sure to be the perfect gift waiting for you to discover! We’re here … and we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

New: Green Glass Figural Bottles

Collector or just a Lover of Glass Bottles

It doesn’t really matter. These green glass figural bottles are simply beautiful.

Below are a few photos of these unique collection we recently received at Bahoukas. I, personally, think a wonderful daylily or two in one of them would make a beautiful statement in your home or office decor.

No matter how you might use them, these green glass figural bottles are spectacular. So we’ll be watchin’ for ya to arrive and browse!

Beautiful Roseville Donatello

You have to see these Donatello pieces by Roseville to appreciate them.

Donatello pieces by Roseville Pottery, c. 1920s - bowls, pottery basket, candle holder - these and more available at Bahoukas.
A few pieces from our latest collection, Roseville Donatello.

In 1908 Harry Rhead succeeded his brother as Art Director. In an era where hand-decorated wares were becoming unpopular and unprofitable, Harry began in earnest to create less labor-intensive lines. He was responsible for the creation of the famous Donatello line, which was produced for at least ten years. They sold over 100 shapes of Donatello and the line made the Roseville Pottery successful and profitable.

from Roseville Art website
3 bowls - Roseville Donatello pottery - c. 1920s at Bahoukas
Donatello Bowls by Roseville Pottery

The Roseville Pottery was incorporated in Roseville, Ohio in 1892. Not only is its history long and well-received, its lines carry great value to collectors even to this day.

As with all other American pottery companies, cheaper imports from Japan undermined their sales. Constantly struggling to survive, Roseville Pottery limped along until 1954, when they sold the company along with all designs and plants to New England Ceramics Company who then sold it to Franklin Potteries of Franklin, WV. In 1954, all production of Roseville Pottery stopped. Even to this day vintage Roseville Pottery is collected by thousands of people world-wide. Prices have undergone wild swings over the years, and some patterns fall into and out of style with collectors. But with a solid history and thousands of different shapes, Roseville Pottery is certain to be collected for many decades to come.

from Roseville Art website

Beautiful Roseville Donatello pieces available at Bahoukas Antiques!

Beautiful pieces of Roseville Donatello - bowl, flower frog, candle holders
Beautiful Donatello by Roseville bowl, flower frog, candle holders

These pieces are outstanding! Stop by and view them for yourself. Beautiful pieces of Roseville Pottery from around the 1920s. And yes, we’ll be watchin’ for you!

Pickle? Ferment? Or just decorate?

Stoneware Crocks have many uses…

Stoneware Crocks and Jugs available at Bahoukas

The word “pickle” comes from a Dutch word ‘pekel’ or northern German ‘pókel’ meaning “salt” or “brine,” two components that are essential in the pickling process. Pickling in America is largely synonymous with the act of submerging cucumbers (or other fruits or vegetables) into a salty brine or acidic solution along with various spices to create an environment where no unhealthy bacteria can survive and your vegetable is preserved.

from Almanac.com

Stoneware crocks were used for pickling and fermenting foods for centuries! The process also gives you an easy and effortless way to make probiotic-rich fermented foods a part of your life. And if you remember pickles or sauerkraut from your grandmother’s pantry, you probably remember the flavor being much more complex and tasty than those you buy in a jar today.

Historically, the process of pickling was a necessity and an invaluable way to preserve foods for sailors and travelers. It provided families with food through the colder months.

from Almanac.com

If you’re interested in an easy-to-read introduction to pickling/fermenting, CLICK HERE for a great blog post and answers to the many questions you might have. And one more site that may be of interest in choosing and caring for a crock, CLICK HERE.

More stoneware crocks and jugs available at Bahoukas Antique Mall

But maybe you just love, love, love these old crocks and jugs. Visit this page for photos of great ways to decorate with crock pots – 36 ways, in fact.

Maybe you’ve found a container that you’d like to make it ‘look’ like an old crock. Here’s a great do-it-yourself solution.

CLICK HERE

Here are the before and after photos…

So, as you can see, we have the crocks and jugs. You can decide which ones you like and how you might use them. Stop in soon and choose your favorites. Yep, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Unique is Bahoukas Antiques

a recently acquired collection of antique powder horns can be seen at Bahoukas Antiques in Havre de Grace
Powder Horns and other unique items can be discovered at Bahoukas!

Our shop offers a dizzying array of antiques and collectibles. But don’t let that make your head hurt. Just give yourself time to browse our 9,000 sq ft of yesteryear! From Havre de Grace history to the amazing Beer MuZeum and everything in-between, you’ll be recalling stories from childhood!

Just two photos of the unique collectibles that we have are the recent selection of collectible/antique powder horns and the medical/pharmaceutical collectibles below.

medical/pharmaceutical collectibles available at Bahoukas in Havre de Grace, MD
This is just one tiny shelf of the medical/pharmaceutical/advertising collectibles in our shop.

Along with very practical mortar and pestle sets, we have many unique medical collectibles that will remind you of products that you may have used in your early years or even items your parents/grandparents may have mentioned.

Whether you just like owning a few ‘conversation pieces,’ or you collect them en masse, we just might have the item that will suit your need or complete your collection.

Stop in soon and enjoy your own adventure as you travel our nostalgia lane! Yep, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Cast Iron Pots

assortment of cast iron pans at Bahoukas in Havre de Grace
A selection of cast iron skillets and more at Bahoukas

The History of Cast Iron Cookware

The first known use of cast iron cookware was during the Han Dynasty in China, around 220 A.D. Casting techniques became widespread in Europe by the 16th century, and since then, this versatile equipment has been a staple in households all over the world. In 1707, Abraham Darby patented the sand casting method, which is similar to the way we make cast iron today. Because of Darby’s contribution, the 18th and 19th centuries saw a boom in cast iron cookware. Cast iron pots and pans were so important to daily life that in his book, The Wealth of Nations, Adam Smith says they were worth more than gold. Cast iron cookware saw a decline in the 20th century as other cooking materials like aluminum grew in popularity.

from WebRestaurantStore.com

Many pieces that seem too difficult to clean-up may be handled with several soakings in vinegar. That and other suggestions are in the following video.

A very informative video re cast iron pans

We have several cast iron cooking/baking pieces that will be great in your home, at the hunting lodge, or to use on your campfire!

Cast iron cookware has been around forever, and it isn’t going anywhere anytime soon. If you want to get in on this trend, follow these tips and you’ll be whipping up pan-seared steaks and skillet cornbread in no time.

from WebRestaurantStore.com
Cast Iron Muffin/Biscuits and more

Stop into Bahoukas Antique Mall today and see if we have a cast iron piece that just might be what you’ve been looking for.

And yes, you know we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Stereoscopes to Virtual Reality

Stereoscopes, Viewmasters, Nintendo, X-box and More…

Recently a young teen came into the shop sharing his love of playing albums on a record player vs mp3’s. We’re also seeing a re-birth of physical book stores. In that light, we thought we’d share these fun items that some of your kids (and adults) might enjoy and appreciate. 

Of course, it’s not too early to think unusual gifts for the coming holidays!

Many of us have seen the original stereoscope, although it might have been in a museum. But it’s effect on entertainment, education, and even culture was definite. It’s amazing to think that Underwood & Underwood was producing over 25,000 images a day for the stereoscope. (See the quote below)

stereoscope with view cards from 1880-1910, Sawyer Stereoscope Viewmaster from the 1950s, modern 3D Viewmaster

Claims that there was a stereoscope in every parlor in America came as early as the 1860s (Darrah, 2), but in their second wave of popularity in the 1880s-1910s, the availability of stereographs could be quantified: Underwood & Underwood, one of the three major stereographic companies in this period, produced over 25,000 images per day (Darrah, 47), and an estimated 300 million stereographs were issued between 1854 to 1920 (Wadja, 112). Selling at six for a dollar, most stereographs captured the interest of middle class consumers, but a few companies catered to the working class, providing similar views at 3 cents a piece or 85 cents per 100 (DeLeskie, 69). Found in drugstores, distributed through mail-order catalogs, given away as premiums by cereal and tea companies, and canvassed cross-country by college students (including a young Carl Sandburg), it is no wonder that many scholars consider the stereoscope as the first mass photographic medium prior to cinema or television (see Trachtenberg, Reading, 17).     from xroads.Virginia.edu

Imagine learning about the wonders of the world, feeling like you were there, as you viewed the scenes in a stereoscope! There was a lot of promise. But, as you know, progress moves on and photographs, movies, and television replaced these viewers. But many saw great promise in connecting humanity at the time!

IN HIS WRITINGS ABOUT the stereoscope, Oliver Wendell Holmes Sr. was what we would now call a tech-utopian. He declared that the stereoscope would become “the card of introduction to make all mankind acquaintances.”   from BostonGlobe.com

The modern day viewmaster can still be fasinating to young children, although I’m afraid they’re now learning to ‘swipe’ rather than click the change lever. Here’s a link to a great history of our modern day view-masters.

If you’re curious as to how 3D-glasses work today (and in the movies), you may want to check out THIS LINK.

Electronic and Computer Consoles/Games

Then we moved to the beginning of electronic games in the 1970s. Many will remember their first Atari or Nintendo video games. and Sega games. In the 1990s Playstation was introduced along with the original X-Box. These links are all courtesy of Wikipedia.

NOTE: If you saw our FB question, the answer to SEGA is that originally the company provided coin-operated slot machines to U.S. bases that were called “Service Games,” later becoming SEGA! Who knew?

At Bahoukas Antique Mall you’ll be able to find some of the games for the above game stations. Stop in and see if we have one you’ve been looking for.

Atari, Nintendo, Sega Genesis, Playstation and X-box games at Bahoukas Antiques in Havre de Grace, MD

Of course, if you’re a real techie, then you may want to visit the following article on CNET about Virtual Reality, 360 viewing, 3-D, augmented reality and more. ENJOY!

Stop in soon… yes we will be watchin’ for ya!

We Need the Rain!

… and a perfect day for reading!

Children's Classic books - assortment available at Bahoukas
Books you may remember – fun for the young people in your life!
Hardy Boys Classics
Hardy Boys Series
Golden books and more make wonderful children's gifts for the holidays! They can be found at Bahoukas.
Even more Golden Books for all ages…

Books are a great way to enjoy a rainy day … or just curl up and read for the fun of it. At Bahoukas Antique Mall we have a surprising number of books in nearly every category. Stop in and discover for yourself that book you’ve always wanted to read!

20 volume set of World's Greatest Literature by Spencer Press available at Bahoukas Antique Mall in Havre de Grace
World’s Great Literature
world of cookbooks available at Bahoukas Antique Mall
World of Cookbooks and more…
Military books and more at Bahoukas Antique Mall
Military books
Collectible Comics Books at Bahoukas Antique Mall in Havre de Grace
Maybe you can’t convince a young one to read a book! But you might
get them started by having them read a comic!

Don’t forget we carry the Pulaski Saga series by Robert F. Lackey. It starts with Pulaski’s Canal and the setting is our very own Susquehanna Lock House! Book six recently released: Serpent’s Compromise. And continues through book seven: Despot’s Heel, coming out in November!

And yes – we’ll be watchin’ for ya! Stop in soon and we’ll help you find a book you’ll enjoy at Bahoukas Antique Mall and Beer MuZeum!

Keys and Locks

We’ve heard it said that “Locks don’t keep the thief out. They know how to open locks. Locks keep the morale person from being tempted.”

Variety of locks including RR locks (B& O, PARR, Southern Rio Grand Pacific, a showcase lock and even handcuffs
Wonderful variety of locks and keys at Bahoukas Antiques

We’ve posted several items related to locks and keys. Consider these links:
Above photo: CLICK HERE Below: CLICK HERE

skeleton keys at Bahoukas
Some are looking for the key to open a chest or a door.
Others just love collecting skelton keys.

The above links share interesting tidbits about padlocks, master locks, and skeleton keys. Take a peek, the stop by and see these items for yourself. Of course, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Celebrate Vintage Tools

Visit Steppingstone Farm Museum …

for their Fall Festival –
Saturday & Sunday, Sept 28-29

As you recover from this past weekend’s amazing weather, we know you’re already thinking of what to do next weekend. We share these ideas – a visit to Steppingstone Farm Museum for their Fall Festival. Then stop in and see what we have available in vintage tools. Of course, we have thousands of square feet of other items …

antique and vintage tools for the craftsman
Vintage tools including planers, ice tongs, and more

CLICK THIS LINK for a variety of vintage tools that we have. Then visit us at Bahoukas Antique Mall for amazing vintage tools. Yep, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Miscellaneous collectible tools
Miscellaneous vintage tools

Ducks – Decoys – Art

Stop by after you visit the Decoy Show

We love ducks. Hey, we live in the Duck Decoy Capitol! How can we NOT love ducks… and duck decoys.

Duck Decoys- shelf 1 – at Bahoukas
Duck Decoys and more – shelf 2 – at Bahoukas

We have unique Havre de Grace carvers – as well as collectible duck figures.

Duck Decoys – shelf 3 – at Bahoukas
Duck Decoys and more – shelf 4 – at Bahoukas

We have fun items and some seriously beautiful carved decoys. You have to browse our shop. You just never know what you’ll find that fits your collection perfectly!

Duck Decoys – shelf 5 – at Bahoukas
Duck Decoys – shelf 6 – at Bahoukas

Add a duck decoy lamp or another unique ‘duck-related’ collectible to make your personal collection truly unique.

Duck Decoys – shelf 7 – at Bahoukas
Duck Decoys – shelf 8 – at Bahoukas

So take some time to stop by Bahoukas Antique Mall and Beer MuZeum. Of course, we have 9,000 sq ft of amazing collections. So yes, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Spring brings summer fabrics!

Need an iron?

Irons from this century

These irons might look familiar to you. Well, maybe to your mom and dad. Electric irons make your cotton clothes look sharp and pressed!

Although clothes made of ‘permanently pressed’ fabrics made needing an iron less necessary, there are still folks who like ‘that perfect crease.’

quite hard to date these slickers, sleekstones’, slickenstones, in german language, glättstein gniedelstein, gniddelstein, grindstein
these glass iron smoothers are believed to have served as a pressing iron. The earliest linen smoothers date from the Viking to the Middle Ages, and the latest were made in the 18th century.

from Roman Glass Makers

Do you know what this is? Is what they call a linen-smoother made from very slick stone. They were used from the days of the Vikings through the Middle Ages and into the 18th century. Who would have guessed!

The forebears to modern electric irons, these flat irons are often triangular or come to a point to make it easier to iron around buttons. The heft of a sad iron would help it hold heat, as well as to press the fabric flat. To protect fabric and surfaces from singeing, sad irons often came with metal trivets to rest on, and these are often-beautiful, intricate, and collectible examples of metalwork that were made in a myriad of designs.

The earliest metal flat irons were forged by blacksmiths in the Middle Ages. These were heated on an open fire or a stove, and the metal handles had to be grasped with a thick potholder, rag, or glove. Women had to be careful not to track soot or ash on the clothing they were ironing.

from Collectors Weekly
flat irons often filled with hot coals or heated on a coal or wood stovetop

Of course, they can be cleaned up and used as a bookend, a doorstop, or just a unique item for your decor that is most certain to be a ‘conversation piece!’

Stop in today and check these out (even if you have no intention of ironing your summer clothes)! We’ll be watchin’ for ya!