Looking for A New Collection? Bossons Maybe?

BOSSONS – THE FACES THAT LAUNCHED A THOUSAND COLLECTIONS

Bossons is the name given to an extraordinary collection of character wall masks, figurines, shelf ornaments, animal studies, wall plaques, lamp bases, bookends, wall clocks, thermometers, barometers, pottery figures and mirrors that were produced by the W. H. Bossons Company of Congleton, England between 1948 and 1996. The brainchild of a talented father and son team, they have become highly sought after works of art all around the world, but especially in the USA and England. 

from Bossons.com
Bosson Chalk Heads - 2
Bosson Chalk Heads

Talk about a small business with a quality of excellence!

Ray Bossons was an extremely talented artist with an intuitive ability to anticipate market trends. He was a perfectionist with regard to the anatomical detail, artistic excellence and historical accuracy of each item of art the company created. He was the creative genius and without question, the designer extraordinaire of the W. H. Bossons companies following the death of his father, W. H. Bossons in 1951. The company’s reputation spread within a comparatively short period of time to all the principal markets of the world. Most of the original ideas and basic concepts came from Ray Bossons fertile imagination. He would sketch the ideas for the wall masks and figurines after much research on each character to be portrayed and relied on his extensive library for research material. The original models were executed in clay by highly talented sculptors with no limit set on the time it took to create an original model.* Ray Bossons would set the standards for the pieces and then turn them over to the staff of painters to complete.

from Bossons.com
*italics by post author

This unique selection of Bosson Chalk Heads can be a perfect start to a new collection. Stop in and see them for yourself. We’re here and we’re watchin’ for ya.

UPDATE: Yes, we WILL be open on New Year’s Day!

Collectible Lighters and Ashtrays

Whether or not you smoke, ashtrays are appealing collectibles for numerous reasons.

First, they are small, which means you can acquire hundreds of ashtrays and display them in a relatively finite amount of space.

Second, they were made out of a wide range of materials, so if you are a fan of art glass, pounded copper, or ceramics, there is bound to be an ashtray for you.

Third, ashtrays were produced during some of the most creative periods in history, which means there are ashtrays for fans of the Victorian era, Arts and Crafts, and Art Deco.

Finally, ashtrays are snapshots of their culture, so it is not uncommon to find ashtrays that were produced to advertise products and events of the day.

from Collector’s Weekly

Ashtrays

variety of collectible ashtrays
Ashtrays came in all styles – silly to beautifully designed, touristy and promotional.

To show you just how diverse ashtray collections can be, here we show you a German Spinner by Gerzt (top center), the resting Mexican (made in Japan), the promotional ashtray from PENROSE, and the horse’s ‘arse’. Yep, something for everyone!

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

Did you know that ashtrays are a design element included in the Cooper Hewitt Museum, located in the Andrew Carnegie Mansion on Fifth Avenue, NYC? We sure wish we had one of these in our collection!

Russel Wright designed ashtray

… is displayed at the Cooper Hewitt

Preserving the natural qualities of ceramics in spite of the dominance of machine-produced pottery has been a challenge for designers since the introduction of machinery to the production process in the eighteenth century.

Russel Wright addressed this design dilemma through his biomorphic earthenware. This ashtray, part of a 1949 series manufactured by Sterling China for hotels and restaurants, embodies Wright’s idea of designing machine-made ceramics that simulate their handcrafted counterparts. Flaring up and out from its low base, the ashtray has a curved, asymmetrical rim that appears as though it was pinched and folded by hand. Although entirely molded by machine, the ashtray’s profile suggests the involvement of human contact throughout its production. The organic form also makes the ashtray user-friendly and invites human contact and interactions: the undulating rim is excellent for resting cigarettes, and the groove holds a matchbook perfectly. The groove also allowed restaurant workers to stack multiple ashtrays, the base of one fitting neatly into the ashtray below.

from Cooper Hewitt

Lighters

Do you ever wonder who invented the first lighter? No, it wasn’t the Zippo Company, though they certainly improved on it! The first was invented in 1823. The Zippo didn’t come into the picture until 1932.

Johann Wolfgang Döbereiner invented the first lighter known as “Döbereiner’s Lamp.” It looked nothing like the lighters we use today and was also difficult to use and extremely dangerous.

from Quality Logo Products
Variety of tabletop novelty lighters: military shell, Zippo, and cigarette case with lighter

The above lighters can be found in our shop and include: Top left: a cigarette case with lighter, a Queen Anne style lighter, a novelty grenade, military shell, and card cube, a Zippo lighter, and a rather art deco looking styled tabletop lighter.

So if you, or someone you know, has a collection of lighters and/or ashtrays, you just might want to check our collection. We’re here. And we’re watchin’ for ya!

Colorful Novelty Radios

These very collectible radios – and they ALL WORK – include a 1950s Baseball Player Radio, a Panapet 1970s Red Ball Radio by Panasonic, a 1970s Snoopy Radio, and a 1998 promotional Pepsi Cola Radio.

close-up view of the 1950s Baseball Player Radio
Baseball Player Radio – 1970s

The Panapet radio is a round novelty radio on a chain, first produced by Panasonic in the early 1970s to commemorate the World Expo in Osaka. Two chrome plated dials on the surface are for tuning and volume, and a tuning display is inset on the surface of the ball. The Panapet is AM band only – no FM. There is a jack for a mono earplug. The Panapet came in several colors including red, yellow, white, blue, purple and avocado green.

from Wikipedia
Pepsi Cola bottle cap styled radio 1998, 1970s Panapet Red Ball Radio, and a 1970s Snoopy character radio at Bahoukas
Novelty Radios – Pepsi Cola, Snoopy, and Red Ball

The Snoopy AM Radio, 1970s, by Determined Productions, Inc.

Connie Boucher, a pioneer in licensing cartoon characters who provided the inspiration for “Happiness Is a Warm Puppy,” a best-selling 1962 book about Snoopy, the “Peanuts” comic strip character, has died at age 72.

Ms. Boucher, who died here Dec. 20 of complications following heart surgery, was a window dresser for I. Magnin in 1959 when she grew dissatisfied with the quality of coloring books available for her two sons. With her husband, Jim Young, she created a Winnie-the-Pooh coloring book, using a character that was in the public domain. The book sold 50,000 copies.

Two years later she founded Determined Productions Inc. to develop other products based on licensing characters. One of her first efforts was a calendar using the characters in the Charlie Brown comic strip.

The Pepsi-Cola Bottle Cap Radio is vintage 1998.

1998 was also the 100th Anniversary of the Pepsi-Cola brand. CLICK HERE for a bit of history. Do you know what Pepsi was originally named before being branded in 1898: See bottom of this post

Whether you love very collectible novelty radios, early transistor radios, or truly vintage radios and phonographs, we have a wonderful collection. Stop in soon. We’re watchin’ for ya!

Answer: Brad’s Drink

Broken China to Beautiful Mosaics

Just like “aloha” means much more than just “hello” or “goodbye,” the shaka is more than just a simple greeting or gesture of thanks. Saying “aloha” means that there is mutual regard and affection for the other person. It is acknowledging the importance of each and every individual in collective existence. This same core value is reflected in the shaka. The simple gesture symbolizes reverence, solidarity, compassion, and friendship. It is a sign of respect and mutual understanding for the recipient.

from Blog.Padi

Shaka Wave Mosaic

This mosaic is strong and joyful. A beautiful creation, one of many, by Barbara Wagner. She creates from both stained glass and broken pieces of china. She is self-taught and amazingly talented.

The link in the quote above also has a fun video describing the ‘history’ of the shaka wave with a good deal of humor! Having a daughter who now lives in Hawaii with her family, Barbara has had a wonderful opportunity to experience the goodwill of the islands.

Art & Antique Shops

It’s really wonderful to see the many ways that antiques and collectibles can be recycled/upcycled with the amazing creativity of crafters and artists. Barbara Wagner (yes, beautiful wife of George) has found her artistic side creating outstanding mosaics from broken pieces of china. So nothing goes to waste at Bahoukas.

In case you’re curious. We found this easy-to-understand blog post explaining the difference between a stained glass and a mosaic glass piece. CLICK HERE to read it.

Framed mosaic “Water” and two ornaments (star and heart) – stained glass mosaics by Barbara Wagner of GreenJoy

Tap Handle

A unique mosaic with colors of the Maryland Flag created by Barbara available at Bahoukas. This would make a perfect gift for that person who has their own beer on tap in their basement mancave or collects unusual beer taps.

Daisies in a Vase

This is one of my favorites created by Barbara. I love the 3-D effect created by using 1/2 of a tiny vase.

Ready to Play Games?

These beautifully crafted mosaic game tables make a wonderful statement: you love games, you appreciate art, and you’re ready to play! No matter your choice – checkers or chess – the beautiful mosaic games tables are a creation to be seen to be truly appreciated.

Stop by Bahoukas

View the amazing stained glass and broken china pieces mosaics created just in time for a perfect holiday gift.

Hurry! They probably won’t be here long.

And yes, we’re here and we’re watchin’ for ya!

Halloween Cookie Cutters and More!

Carve Pumpkins!

We know it’s only a few days until Halloween. But if you’re planning on baking some cookies, you may want to stop in and purchase this delightful and collectible set of metal cookie cutters celebrating Halloween.

But did you know you can use these metal cookie cutters to also help you carve pumpkins?

We found this amazing blog post on the many ways you might use cookie cutters to create everything from designs on your toast, little hearts on pizza, to holiday ornaments.

READ IT HERE for 47 Great Ideas

Perfect metal cookie cutters for your card playing group - diamond, heart, club, spade

Love to Play Cards?

Add a bit of fun to your game night.

Make cookies or cut sandwiches with
cookie cutters in the perfect designs:

Diamonds – Hearts – Spades – Clubs!

miscellaneous metal cookie cutters available at Bahoukas Antiques
horse, star, heart, bell, circle
Metal cookie cutters: round, bell, heart (this one is from the 1930s), star and horse

Plan ahead for the coming holidays

Along with the miscellaneous cookie cutters above, we also have these delightful designs that are just perfect for the holidays. The dark tin ones are from the 1930s, the Halloween ones are from the 70s, and the others are probably 50s to 70s.

Christmas metal cookie cutters (the dark tin ones are from the 1930s - candy cane, snowman, gingerbread man, Santa, and tree
Metal cookie cutters for the holidays – the dark tin ones are from the 1930s.
Candy Cane, Snowman, Gingerbread Man, Santa, and Christmas Tree

We’re here…

We want to make the coming holidays easy for you, fun for everyone, and a bit unique. Stop in and see what you might find for a perfect gift, a great addition to your decorating, or to find an item that makes your creativity blossom when you make your special holiday gifts.

And yep, we most certainly are watchin’ for ya!

Japan: Samurai Helmet Coin Craft

In researching for this post, we were surprised by the fact that this Japanese Samurai Helmet made of 5-yen coins is actually a popular craft. Here’s a quote from one story we read about a Tokyo grade-schooler back in the 1980s who created an entire suit of armor:

A photo of an entire suit of Samurai armor created in coin craft by a gradeschool student in Tokyo in the 1980s. From Japan Today magazine
an entire suit of Samurai armor in coin craft

@take14aki estimates that the armor and helmet required somewhere around 1,750 coins to put together,
which works out to 8,750 yen in legal tender.

from JAPAN TODAY

It’s interesting to learn that there are quite a few pieces of Samurai armor created with Japanese coins and tokens. Want to view more? Do a search for <Samurai Coin Helmets> and see for yourself.

Details of the Japanese Samurai coin craft helmet in our shop at Bahoukas Antiques.
Detail of our amazing handcrafted Samurai Helmet made of coins
Photo of Samurai Helmets made from legos from the Lego Ideas site.

LEGO IDEAS

While researching, we also found this interesting Samurai project from the Lego Ideas site! Who would have thought!

Just like we tell you all the time, we are most definitely a “Collection of Collections.” Some are very unique items as you can tell from our beautiful Samurai Coin Crafted Helmet. We hope you’ll stop in and give it a look! It’s quite an amazing piece and in great shape! (Of course, we wouldn’t want to wear something like this in battle!!!)

Yep, we’re watchin’ for ya! See you soon.

What Can We Learn From Old Newspapers?

Bahoukas has just received an interesting collection of old newspapers.

Ephemera

Old newspapers can give us the feel of a particular time period, details of history from the news stories and editorials, and a good deal about life through their ads and human interest stories. So why do people collect them?

Well, often they’ve kept papers from a historical period – a war, presidential news, disasters, and such. Sometimes a newspaper may connect to a particular birthdate, death, a favorite sports team, and other more personal topics.

Kennedy Assassination

Photo of the newspaper: The Philadelphia Inquirer of Nov, 23, 1963 - Kennedy Shot to Death - Johnson is Sworn in as President

Newspaper: The New York Times, Nov. 24, 1963 - headlines: Kennedy's Body Lies in White House; Johnson at Helm with Wide Backing; Police Say Prinsoner is the Assassin
newspaper Delaware County Daily Times, Mon. Nov 25, 1963
Headline: Kennedy's Assassin Is Dead

LINDBERGH

This 1927 newspaper is in good condition for coming out of someone’s attic.

Japanese Surrender – WWII

newspaper: The New York Times, Wed. Aug. 15, 1945 
Headlines: Japan Surrenders, End of War! Emperor Accepts Allied Rule; M'Arthur Supreme Commander; Our Manpower Curbs Voided

newspaper: The New York Times, Sun. Sept 2, 1945
Headlines: Japan Surrenders to Allies, Signs Rigid Terms on Warship; Truman Sets Today as V-J Day

We have others in our recently acquired collection of old newspapers. It’s so interesting to read from the very day of these events. In many cases, these are complete newspapers giving you the opportunity to really get the atmosphere in our country surrounding these historic moments!

Why Would Anyone Collect Newspapers?

Sometimes, newspapers writing of historical events were tucked away only to be left in their hideaway for a later generation to discover. But there are collectors who save papers of historical significance. Others collect them for the feel of a particular time period, a birth or obituary, news of someone famous or notorious, and for an event in the family’s life.

There are even collectors who love to save the advertisements, whether for a particular product or brand, or just advertising in general.

Whatever the reasons, we have a rather wonderful collection that, if you love old newspapers, you may want to come in and take a peek. And you can be sure – we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Vintage Photos & Tintypes

Why Collect Old Photos?

If you’ve browsed an antique shop, you’ve most likely noticed the old photos in boxes, stacked in corners. You’ve also most likely been drawn to one or two, wondering where the place is or who are those people. You may have even commented on their attire or the sternness in their expression. The article connected to the following quote is a very easy and interesting read.

The People Who Collect Strangers’ Memories

In gathering old photographs of daily life, family scenes, and illness, hobbyists get an intimate view into past lives.

from The ATlantic
photo that looks like an old school building c. 1906
c. 1906 – looks like an old school building

There are many reasons old photographs are collected. Some folks are looking for certain locations while others may be collecting a category, say, a particular advertising, old motorcycles, vintage farm photos, portraits. You name it, someone’s collecting it.

But we’re most assuredly pulled into wondering about the story behind the photo.

photo of a Farrell Auto Co. advertising BUICK
Farrell Auto Co. photo advertising BUICK
vintage photos of people
Vintage photos – don’t you wonder about who they are?

What To Do With The Found Vintage Photos You Love

Feeling crafty? This article gives some great ways to incorporate those vintage photos into your decor. CLICK HERE for the article from salvagedliving.com

TINTYPES

Tintypes

We also have a few tintypes in our store. Do you know what “tintypes” are?

tintype, also known as a melainotype or ferrotype, is a photograph made by creating a direct positive on a thin sheet of metal coated with a dark lacquer or enamel and used as the support for the photographic emulsion. Tintypes enjoyed their widest use during the 1860s and 1870s, but lesser use of the medium persisted into the early 20th century and it has been revived as a novelty and fine art form in the 21st.

from wikipedia

It might also be of interest to you to learn why tintypes are so special.

Tintypes are a very early type of antique photograph dating back to the late 19th century. 

… There is no negative in the tintype process, making each one a rare, one-of-a-kind photograph. Tintypes are valuable capsules of history and should only be directly worked on by an archival specialist. Today virtually all tintype images needing restoration are restored digitally on the computer.

from Our EveryDay Life

CLICK HERE for an intriguing article that explains much more about the markings on a tintype and also how to get some clues from the photo. It’s a really interesting piece.

So there you have it. We have vintage photos and a few tintypes. Stop in and see if something catches your fancy or adds to a particular collection you may have. In the meantime, be assured. We’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Might You Be A Deltiologist?

OOOOooooo… DELTIOLOGIST – another fun word.

Deltiology … is the study and collection of postcards. Professor Randall Rhoades of Ashland, Ohio, coined a word in 1945 that became the accepted description of the study of picture postcards. It initially took about 20 years for the name to appear in a dictionary.

from wikipedia

Our feature photo shows a variety of postcards for different holidays. But we have plenty more throughout the store.

Postcards are considered “ephemera:”

things that exist or are used or enjoyed for only a short time.”there were papers, letters, old boxes—all sorts of ephemera”

from a Google Search
Beautiful Vintage Postcards at Bahoukas Antique Mall in Havre de Grace
Beautiful Vintage Postcards

Crafty?

Are you wondering what you might do with old postcards? Check out this article that offers 16 PROJECTS. Some of the ideas mentioned include scrapbooking, decoupage, origami, and framing them to display.

We look forward to showing you our collections of postcards. And absolutely, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Heddon Fishing Lures

1898– The original fishing lures were frogs carved from broomsticks by James Heddon. He came upon the idea when he threw a stick he had whittled into a local lake known as the Mill Pond, and watched as a bass hit it.

from wikipedia

This assortment of fishing lures includes Heddon crazy crawler (wood), red one – dare devil lure, wood frog, wood grasshopper – all vintage. The metal one is a dingbat popper. The large one is a gold color wooden pike.

Larger view of the frog and grasshopper (Heddon lures)

A bit more about the Heddon lures:

1902– The first manufactured fishing lures were created by James and his son Will (also, W.T.). Will moved to Florida to test and develop new plugs, as the wooden lures became known.

1932– The first plastic fishing lures were introduced. They gained the name “Spook” because of their transparent color appearance. These early lures were susceptible to decay from poor early plastic mixtures. Few examples remain, the examples that have survived usually are distorted by bubbling. Because of their scarcity, they are premium priced collectors items today.

FROM WIKIPEDIA

It’s all serendipity!

Who would have thought tossing a whittled stick in the water would lead to a small business that created something people still collect today?

Stop in and check this out plus several others. You just never know what you’ll discover at Bahoukas Antique Mall and Beer MuZeum. We’re here…and we’re watchin’ for ya!

Lunch Boxes Started with Dads in Coal Mines

…working men protected their lunches from the perils of the job site (just imagine what a coal mine or a quarry could do to a guy’s sandwich) with heavy-duty metal pails.

from SmithonianMagazine
Historic lunchbox, 1880s. A tobacco box was recycled as lunch box. Harold Dorwin / SI
Historic lunchbox, 1880s. A tobacco box was recycled as lunch box.
Harold Dorwin / SI

Soon after…

Around the 1880s, school children who wanted to emulate their daddies fashioned similar caddies out of empty cookie or tobacco tins. According to the timeline, the first commercial lunch boxes, which resembled metal picnic baskets decorated with scenes of playing children, came out in 1902.

from SmithonianMagazine

The American History Museum of the Smithsonian Institute houses the lunchbox collection. For information to visit, CLICK HERE!

lunchboxes by the score at Bahoukas Antiques in Havre de Grace
Wonderful selection of lunchboxes at Bahoukas!

We’ve written a great deal about lunchboxes and shared our collection in previous posts.

SEE THESE POSTS BY CLICKING HERE

Do you have a favorite boo character/tv show/celebrity collectible lunchbox? Or maybe you’ve been looking for one? Stop in and visit us soon to see our extensive collection.

Metal and Plastic Lunch Boxes at Bahoukas
More lunchboxes from the collection at Bahoukas.

Yes, we are watchin’ for ya! And don’t forget, school is right around the corner. Possibly your youngster would love to have a lunchbox from Bahoukas!

Local Souvenirs – Bel Air

The Sabina Line by Sabin Industries

Sabin Industries’ home was McKeesport, PA.

This company, founded by Samuel Sabin in 1946, did not manufacture china, but it decorated “blanks” (i.e., undecorated pieces of china) purchased from ceramics companies that made the actual pottery and porcelain. Sabin applied decoration to these blanks — often by using decals — and then resold them to a variety of wholesalers or retailers. It is reported that Sabin also decorated glass.

from SeattleTimes.com
The Sabina Line of souvenir plates for Bel Air, MD. 22k gold trim - artwork by George Stubbs. Available at Bahoukas in Havre de Grace, MD
Bel Air, MD souvenir plate with art by George Stubbs

Most of the Sabina Line souvenir plates had 22k gold trim.

Souvenir plate for Bel Air, MD from the Sabina Line with 22k gold trim and artwork by John Ferneley.
Bel Air, MD souvenir plate with artwork by John Ferneley

These are beautiful plates. You can see them in our store. And absolutely, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Beautiful Roseville Donatello

You have to see these Donatello pieces by Roseville to appreciate them.

Donatello pieces by Roseville Pottery, c. 1920s - bowls, pottery basket, candle holder - these and more available at Bahoukas.
A few pieces from our latest collection, Roseville Donatello.

In 1908 Harry Rhead succeeded his brother as Art Director. In an era where hand-decorated wares were becoming unpopular and unprofitable, Harry began in earnest to create less labor-intensive lines. He was responsible for the creation of the famous Donatello line, which was produced for at least ten years. They sold over 100 shapes of Donatello and the line made the Roseville Pottery successful and profitable.

from Roseville Art website
3 bowls - Roseville Donatello pottery - c. 1920s at Bahoukas
Donatello Bowls by Roseville Pottery

The Roseville Pottery was incorporated in Roseville, Ohio in 1892. Not only is its history long and well-received, its lines carry great value to collectors even to this day.

As with all other American pottery companies, cheaper imports from Japan undermined their sales. Constantly struggling to survive, Roseville Pottery limped along until 1954, when they sold the company along with all designs and plants to New England Ceramics Company who then sold it to Franklin Potteries of Franklin, WV. In 1954, all production of Roseville Pottery stopped. Even to this day vintage Roseville Pottery is collected by thousands of people world-wide. Prices have undergone wild swings over the years, and some patterns fall into and out of style with collectors. But with a solid history and thousands of different shapes, Roseville Pottery is certain to be collected for many decades to come.

from Roseville Art website

Beautiful Roseville Donatello pieces available at Bahoukas Antiques!

Beautiful pieces of Roseville Donatello - bowl, flower frog, candle holders
Beautiful Donatello by Roseville bowl, flower frog, candle holders

These pieces are outstanding! Stop by and view them for yourself. Beautiful pieces of Roseville Pottery from around the 1920s. And yes, we’ll be watchin’ for you!

Pink Flamingo? Oh yeah…

Do you know the history behind the plastic pink flamingo?

First designed in 1957, the fake birds are natives not of Florida but of Leominster, Massachusetts, which bills itself as the Plastics Capital of the World. At a nearby art school, sculptor Don Featherstone was hired by the plastics company Union Products, where his second assignment was to sculpt a pink flamingo. 

…A flamingo-friendly trend was the sameness of post-World War II construction. Units in new subdivisions sometimes looked virtually identical. “You had to mark your house somehow,” Featherstone says. “A woman could pick up a flamingo at the store and come home with a piece of tropical elegance under her arm to change her humdrum house.” Also, “people just thought it was pretty,” adds Featherstone’s wife, Nancy.

from The Smithsonian

Part of this amazing story is that Don Featherstone’s net worth was about 5 million dollars.

4' high beautiful tin, pink  flamingo sculpture at Bahoukas in Havre de Grace
Our beautiful, pink flamingo TIN sculpture stands 4′ high.

By the mid-1960s, the environmental back-to-nature movement more-or-less declared the very word ‘plastic’ an adjective for fake, and the American Dream was exposed as an empty ideal based in consumerism.

from BBC TRAVEL

The plastic flamingo became a bit of a class symbol as in, “Oh I’d never have that in MY yard!” The whole idea of ‘plastics’ was now gauche.

Enter John Waters of Baltimore

In 1972, Waters released the film Pink Flamingos, which was called both an abomination and an instant classic. The movie has almost nothing to do with the tropical fowl that stand sentinel during the opening credits…

from The Smithsonian

Optimism to Tacky to Nearly Banned and Back Again

The plastic pink flamingo following WWII was received as a symbol of the American Dream and optimism. Later it became the ridicule of all things plastic! Only to be revived as a kind of cult acceptance.

The plastic pink flamingo is a perfect example of perceived style going ‘out’ and returning years later. Sometimes tongue-in-cheek, sometimes with genuine appreciation, the pink flamingo seems to be a mainstay in American Culture, often just to be a bit silly or even contrarian!

But OUR PINK FLAMINGO is the creme de la creme – she’s a beautiful tin (not plastic) sculpture.

So whatever reason you might have to own a pink flamingo, you’ll definitely want to consider ours!

Pink Flamingo Movie Trivia

from Wikipedia

In the media and fiction, plastic flamingos are often used as a symbol of kitsch, bad taste and cheapness.

  • The movie Pink Flamingos is named after them and helped them become an icon of trash and kitsch.
  • In the television sitcom ALF, jokes about the garden flamingos of the neighboring Ochmonek couple are a running gag.
  • In the computer game The Sims, plastic flamingos are the cheapest garden decoration.
  • The animated film Gnomeo & Juliet features a garden flamingo named after its inventor, Featherstone, voiced by Jim Cummings.
  • In the television show The X-Files episode Arcadia (The X-Files), Mulder places one on the lawn of his rented house, contrary to the neighbourhood rules.

Here at Bahoukas, we try to be able to share a bit of trivia with our collections. As you can tell from this article, we work to discover little tidbits that will make your purchase extra special! Don’t forget, we’re hear and ready to say, “Welcome” (and maybe share a bit of trivia with you)!

Art … and Movie Poster

Celebrating the HdG Art Show

It’s not quite the same – movie posters and art shows. But here at Bahoukas Antique Mall and Beer MuZeum, we wanted to be sure to show our enthusiasm for the 56th Annual Havre de Grace Art Show sponsored by the Soroptimist International Havre de Grace!

Tropic Zone with Ronald Reagan
and Rhonda Fleming, 1953

Tropic Zone poster
, featuring Ronald Reagan and Rhonda Fleming (1953)

Reagan’s character, Dan McCloud, is an American (described as a “soldier of fortune” in the publicity for the picture’s release who becomes the foreman of a Central American banana plantation. Learning that his employer, Lukats, is corrupt and trying to corner the market, McCloud joins with one of the smaller growers (played by Rhonda Fleming) to organize the workers and stop Lukats’ scheme.

from WIKIPEDIA

Rhonda Fleming was known as the “Queen of Technicolor” and is still loved by many cinephiles. If you’d like to view this movie, we’ve linked to it here.

Blood Alley with John Wayne
and Lauren Bacall is a 1955 film.

Blood Alley poster

A group of oppressed villagers ask a merchant skipper to guide their Chinese ferry to Hong Kong and freedom, but the skipper, a prisoner of the Chinese authorities, must first be sprung from captivity before he can ferry the stolen paddleship. Navigating the treacherous waters, the captain and his strange crew have a gun boat and a destroyer hot on their heels.

from Wikipedia

Tennessee’s Partner 1955 film features John Payne,
Ronald Reagan, Rhonda Fleming and Coleen Gray

Tennessee’s Partner poster

A debonair gambler, Tennessee (John Payne), gets into some trouble in the rough-and-tumble mining town of Sandy Bar, Calif., and it takes the bold action of Cowpoke (Ronald Reagan) to get him out of it. Grateful for Cowpoke’s intrusion, Tennessee does him a huge favor and informs Cowpoke that his fiancée, Goldie (Coleen Gray), is a dastardly gold digger. Cowpoke isn’t pleased with Tennessee’s news and they fight. But Cowpoke comes to the gambler’s aid just when Tennessee needs him the most.

from Google Search

What’s interesting is this movie is actually based on a novel published in 1869!

Tennessee’s Partner is a short story by Bret Harte, first published in the Overland Monthly in 1869, which has been described as “one of the earliest ‘buddy’ stories in American fiction.” It was later loosely adapted into four films.

First printed in California in the Overland Monthly for October 1869, “Tennessee’s Partner” was reprinted the following month in Baltimore, in the New Eclectic Magazine. In 1870 the story was published in a collected volume of Harte’s short stories, printed in Boston, The Luck of Roaring Camp and Other Sketches. Reviews of the volume appeared in the Lakeside Monthly, the Atlantic Monthly, and in Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine, all giving particular mention to “Tennessee’s Partner”. In the same year the story was anthologized in London in George Augustus Sala’s A 3rd Supply of Yankee Drolleries: The Most Recent Works of the Best American Humourists. Thereafter it continued to appear in magazines, such as Boston’s weekly Every Saturday of Jan. 14, 1871, as well as in other anthologies and in collections of Bret Harte’s work.

from Wikipedia

So there you have our addition to this weekend of celebrating the arts. CLICK HERE for the weekend schedule!

Be sure to stop into Bahoukas Antique Mall and Beer MuZeum because you already know, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Wednesday Surprise #13

Bust of David, a Camel, and a Decorative Pitcher

Bust of David available at Bahoukas Antiques

Sitting high on a shelf, we discovered this bust of David. Possibly there’s a shelf in your home or office that’s perfect for this piece.

Our wood carved camel is another beautiful and unusual piece available in our shop. Maybe it would be perfect for your collection?

This chalk, decorative pitcher is beautiful. Do you have a special spot in your home or office for this unique piece?

You know that there are many items tucked up high on a shelf or maybe in a box. We encourage you to stop in to Bahoukas Antique Mall to discover a perfect collectible for your home or office – or maybe as a gift. Yep, we’re here and we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Wednesday Surprise 12

Bahoukas and Thomas Kinkade

Beautiful Thomas Kincade figurines

As you know we are always searching for a unique collection. Looking closely at a number of shelves, these beautiful Thomas Kinkade figurines, Victorian and Elegant Ladies, caught our eye. One, or several, may be a perfect gift for a lady you know (young or old) or a wonderful addition to your own collections.

Stop by Bahoukas Antique Mall to see these exquisite figurines. We’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Collecting Pencil Sharpeners

… who knew?

Amazing Tiny Pencil Sharpeners just arrived at Bahoukas Antiques

Taking photos for this blog, I discovered a shelf stuffed with die-cast pencil sharpeners… little tiny pencil sharpeners. These are amazingly detailed. Who would have thought?!?

Here’s one example of a serious collector that also shows us how many kinds of miniature pencil sharpeners there are! Click on the link in the quote for more info.

For many years we (Johan and Anky) have collected Die-cast miniature pencil sharpeners. Our collection now consists of over 500 different pieces and we would like to add some more.

from Sharpenking
Check out the variety and detail of this recently acquired collection!

GIFTS IDEAS?

If someone has a special interest whether it be music, cars, motorcycles photography, art … well, you name it, we probably have a miniature pencil sharpener that would make an outstanding, fun, and thoughtful gift.

Here is another collector of tiny pencil sharpeners:

Paul Johnson collected 3,479 pencil sharpeners (no duplicates) and displayed them in a one-room shed in his yard in Carbon Hill. He died July 2010; the shed and collection are now displayed in the Hocking Hills Regional Welcome Center.

from Roadside America

We encourage you to check out this most amazing collection that we just acquired at Bahoukas Antique Mall and Beer MuZeum. Yes sir (m’am), we’ll be watchin’ for ya!