Need A Go-Go Girl for Your New Year’s Eve Party

It may not be politically correct, but this go-go girl will certainly generate a few giggles and a lot of conversation this New Year’s Eve as she mixes a drink or two. Created in 1969 by Poynter Products.

Welcome 2022 – Happy New Year!

Stop in today if you’d like to have her mix a drink or two on your bar to bring in the New Year! We’re here and we’re watchin’ for ya.

UPDATE: Yes, we WILL be open New Year’s Day!!!

Are You a Coca-Cola Collector?

Coca-Cola Coolers and Wood Crates

History of The Coca-Cola Company

We celebrate our company’s rich history. Since its birth at a soda fountain in downtown Atlanta in 1886, Coca‑Cola has been a catalyst for social interaction and inspired innovation. Discover the unique moments from our past, like the evolution of the iconic Coca-Cola bottle, the lovable Coca-Cola Santa Claus, and more.

from The Coca-Cola Company website
Smaller Coca-Cola cooler
Need a great cooler for your tailgate party or your next gathering?

This cooler allows you to put ice and bottles above and store the wood crates below. Perfect for your summer gatherings! Ideal as a gift for the Coca-Cola collector!

Larger Coca-Cola cooler with room to store wood crates underneath.
A perfect cooler for the summer yard parties – room for ice and bottles/cans on top and store cartons underneath.

Speaking of Wood Crates

Coca-Cola wood crates

Wood Crates

We have a variety of wood crates available, Coca-Cola and others. They are useful for so many things.

Do you love repurposing things?
CLICK THIS LINK for 22 fun DIY ideas!

We can’t close without a great Coca-Cola Christmas Commercial!

Okay, it’s the holiday season and we can’t resist sharing just one of the many cute ads created for Coca-Cola. Enjoy, then stop in to visit us. Yessirree… we’re here and we’re watchin’ for ya!

Just one of many heartwarming and fun videos from Coca-Cola!

National Beer Sports Film and RC Cola Cans

We wish you a wonderful Thanksgiving.
Enjoy all that you have – share when you can.
Savor friends and family.
Don’t forget – we are CLOSED
Thanksgiving Day.
Then back to our regular hours – 7 days/week –
Til Christmas Day!

from George at Bahoukas Antique Mall

This unique piece recently arrived at our shop. The label on this 16mm film says “National Beer Sports Film” and also “Orioles in Action” with the number “Harco 603.” Also on the label is: “from Chesapeake Bay … Land of Pleasant Living.” It was created by WLVA radio station and is dated Sept. 29, 1961!

National Beer 16mm Sports Film with Orioles 1961
National Beer Sports Film – Orioles in Action

We are not sure if it’s an entire game or a series of highlights. If someone doesn’t grab this very unique piece, George may try to find a working 16mm film projector to check it out.

For those who love old films, National Beer, and/or the Orioles of 1961 – it’s a great piece! Don’t forget that we’re less than 5 weeks from Christmas. This would make a beer collector drool!

RC Cola Collectible Cans

RC Cola Cans – 1970s – baseball players

It seems that since Covid-19 decided to impose itself on our lives, folks have turned to collecting again. Baseball cards have definitely been one of those items that have gained new fans.

Very collectible 1970s RC Cola Cans with baseball player photos and stats

This collection 1970s RC Cola cans feature baseball players with their photos and stats on the can. We thought that those who might have renewed their interest in baseball memorabilia would enjoy checking out this collection of RC Cola cans!

Large collection of 1970s RC Cola cans featuring baseball players

We have a large collection of these cans. Are you ready to start a new collection – or maybe complete one you already have started? Well, don’t hesitate. Stop in today and we’ll point you in the right direction!

Stop in today and chat with George. And you bet, they’re watchin’ for ya!

Unique Beer Memorabilia

For your home bar, mancave, or just a unique collection, we have an assortment of wood plaques with beer labels on them.

5×5 Wood Plaques with Beer labels. Great display for your bar, mancave, or with your beer memorabilia.

Beer Label On Display

These 5″x5″ wood plaques with beer labels are a great way to add a bit of class to your beer memorabilia collection.

Stop in today and browse the ones we have. Could be a great gift for someone who loves anything ‘beer.’

And yes, we’re be watchin’ for ya!

Collectible Lighters and Ashtrays

Whether or not you smoke, ashtrays are appealing collectibles for numerous reasons.

First, they are small, which means you can acquire hundreds of ashtrays and display them in a relatively finite amount of space.

Second, they were made out of a wide range of materials, so if you are a fan of art glass, pounded copper, or ceramics, there is bound to be an ashtray for you.

Third, ashtrays were produced during some of the most creative periods in history, which means there are ashtrays for fans of the Victorian era, Arts and Crafts, and Art Deco.

Finally, ashtrays are snapshots of their culture, so it is not uncommon to find ashtrays that were produced to advertise products and events of the day.

from Collector’s Weekly

Ashtrays

variety of collectible ashtrays
Ashtrays came in all styles – silly to beautifully designed, touristy and promotional.

To show you just how diverse ashtray collections can be, here we show you a German Spinner by Gerzt (top center), the resting Mexican (made in Japan), the promotional ashtray from PENROSE, and the horse’s ‘arse’. Yep, something for everyone!

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

Did you know that ashtrays are a design element included in the Cooper Hewitt Museum, located in the Andrew Carnegie Mansion on Fifth Avenue, NYC? We sure wish we had one of these in our collection!

Russel Wright designed ashtray

… is displayed at the Cooper Hewitt

Preserving the natural qualities of ceramics in spite of the dominance of machine-produced pottery has been a challenge for designers since the introduction of machinery to the production process in the eighteenth century.

Russel Wright addressed this design dilemma through his biomorphic earthenware. This ashtray, part of a 1949 series manufactured by Sterling China for hotels and restaurants, embodies Wright’s idea of designing machine-made ceramics that simulate their handcrafted counterparts. Flaring up and out from its low base, the ashtray has a curved, asymmetrical rim that appears as though it was pinched and folded by hand. Although entirely molded by machine, the ashtray’s profile suggests the involvement of human contact throughout its production. The organic form also makes the ashtray user-friendly and invites human contact and interactions: the undulating rim is excellent for resting cigarettes, and the groove holds a matchbook perfectly. The groove also allowed restaurant workers to stack multiple ashtrays, the base of one fitting neatly into the ashtray below.

from Cooper Hewitt

Lighters

Do you ever wonder who invented the first lighter? No, it wasn’t the Zippo Company, though they certainly improved on it! The first was invented in 1823. The Zippo didn’t come into the picture until 1932.

Johann Wolfgang Döbereiner invented the first lighter known as “Döbereiner’s Lamp.” It looked nothing like the lighters we use today and was also difficult to use and extremely dangerous.

from Quality Logo Products
Variety of tabletop novelty lighters: military shell, Zippo, and cigarette case with lighter

The above lighters can be found in our shop and include: Top left: a cigarette case with lighter, a Queen Anne style lighter, a novelty grenade, military shell, and card cube, a Zippo lighter, and a rather art deco looking styled tabletop lighter.

So if you, or someone you know, has a collection of lighters and/or ashtrays, you just might want to check our collection. We’re here. And we’re watchin’ for ya!

Colorful Novelty Radios

These very collectible radios – and they ALL WORK – include a 1950s Baseball Player Radio, a Panapet 1970s Red Ball Radio by Panasonic, a 1970s Snoopy Radio, and a 1998 promotional Pepsi Cola Radio.

close-up view of the 1950s Baseball Player Radio
Baseball Player Radio – 1970s

The Panapet radio is a round novelty radio on a chain, first produced by Panasonic in the early 1970s to commemorate the World Expo in Osaka. Two chrome plated dials on the surface are for tuning and volume, and a tuning display is inset on the surface of the ball. The Panapet is AM band only – no FM. There is a jack for a mono earplug. The Panapet came in several colors including red, yellow, white, blue, purple and avocado green.

from Wikipedia
Pepsi Cola bottle cap styled radio 1998, 1970s Panapet Red Ball Radio, and a 1970s Snoopy character radio at Bahoukas
Novelty Radios – Pepsi Cola, Snoopy, and Red Ball

The Snoopy AM Radio, 1970s, by Determined Productions, Inc.

Connie Boucher, a pioneer in licensing cartoon characters who provided the inspiration for “Happiness Is a Warm Puppy,” a best-selling 1962 book about Snoopy, the “Peanuts” comic strip character, has died at age 72.

Ms. Boucher, who died here Dec. 20 of complications following heart surgery, was a window dresser for I. Magnin in 1959 when she grew dissatisfied with the quality of coloring books available for her two sons. With her husband, Jim Young, she created a Winnie-the-Pooh coloring book, using a character that was in the public domain. The book sold 50,000 copies.

Two years later she founded Determined Productions Inc. to develop other products based on licensing characters. One of her first efforts was a calendar using the characters in the Charlie Brown comic strip.

The Pepsi-Cola Bottle Cap Radio is vintage 1998.

1998 was also the 100th Anniversary of the Pepsi-Cola brand. CLICK HERE for a bit of history. Do you know what Pepsi was originally named before being branded in 1898: See bottom of this post

Whether you love very collectible novelty radios, early transistor radios, or truly vintage radios and phonographs, we have a wonderful collection. Stop in soon. We’re watchin’ for ya!

Answer: Brad’s Drink

New Collection of HdG Milk Bottles

Do You Remember a Milkman?

Many have fond memories of their milkman delivering local milk in bottles. Some even remember having an insulated box that sat outside the door for the milkman to place your bottles.

Wonderful Local Collection

Bahoukas has acquired an extensive local collection of Havre de Grace milk bottles. Besides George’s personal collection, we have plenty to share.

Dairies often embossed their name, logo, or initials onto the base of their milk bottles. This made it easy to identify their bottles at stores and bottle exchanges. Since milk bottles were used over and over again, it was important for a dairy to get their milk bottles back after use. The more times a milk bottle was used, the more profit for the dairy.

from Dr. Lori

Quarts-Pints-Half Pints

There are so many delightful ways to use these bottles besides just having them in a collection, sitting on a shelf.

Fill with colored water and place on a window sill. Better yet, add some fresh flowers.

Maybe you have a collection – like different colored sands or buttons – that would look lovely kept in these bottles.

Don’t forget the rest of our milk bottle collection!

We have an extensive collection of milk bottles. Here’s a pic:

scores of collectible milk bottles at Bahoukas Antique Mall in Havre de Grace
Huge collection of milk bottles at Bahoukas Antiques

Don’t forget that these would make interesting flower or candle holders for a wedding or other special events. Stop in and look over this collection. You know, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Lucite Clamshell Phone 1970s

During the 1970s phone subscribers were permitted to own decorative housings for their phones for the first time.
Teleconcepts was one of the pioneers that provided innovative decorative phones.

from WORTHPOINT.com

This unique and quite charming clamshell phone is the “Shellamar” by Teleconcepts. It has a retractable fabric cord and YES, it absolutely works. I believe the color would be ‘caramel.’

Did you know deregulation brought us these phone designs?

The Deregulated Phone
The 1977 breakup of AT&T revolutionized telephone design, which had been, as Michael Sorkin noted, “sheltered from the vagaries of taste and the manipulations of the marketplace.” The phone was no longer a standardized, leased portal into AT&T’s network; it became an object unto itself, with results that verged on a kind of giddy kitsch, as if people were overcompensating for the long gray-flannel winter. “Today Alexander Graham Bell’s invention comes in a menagerie of forms,” the New York Times wrote in 1986, “that include Coca-Cola bottles, toucans, peekaboo Lucite globes and, in the case of the desk-top Versailles phone, with a reproduction Renoir discreetly planted in the number card.” 

from SLATE
A variety of decorative phones that include Cabbage Patch Doll image, turkey, airplane, and Fashion Shoe.
Cabbage Patch phone, Turkey phone, Airplane phone The Farmer’s Novelty Phones/gifarmer.com; Shoe phone dldt via ebay. from SLATE.com

What fun it is to consider the changing look and feel of telephones and the continuing changes from big, boxy, cell phones to our modern-day ‘smart’ phone where the telephone function is a small part of the instrument!

scene from the movie Wall Street with Gordon Gekko talking on his Motorola DynaTAC phone!
from MASIP

In 1973, the company came up with a prototype of the world’s first portable cellular telephone, using the DynaTAC (Dynamic Adaptive Total Area Coverage) system. In the year 1983, the world’s first commercial hand-held cellular phone, the Motorola DynaTAC 8000X phone, got FCC’s approval.

Weighing in at 28-ounce (794-gram), it went on sale the following year. The device used to take 10 hours to fully charge, and offered around 30 minutes of talk-time. Capable of saving last 30 dialed numbers, it carried a price tag of $3,995.

from GSMArena

The Motorola DynaTAC (1983)

The phone had long appeared in advertisements in the hands of executives as they sat in their cocoons of power, surveying their empire below, but a new kind of power was typified in the 1987 film Wall Street, in which Michael Douglas’ Gordon Gekko clutches a Motorola DynaTAC 8000X. “Oh, jeez, I wish you could see this,” he tells Bud Fox, as he walks a Hamptons beach, “the lights coming up over the water.” It’s like an advertisement for dominion over place: You can’t be here, but I can, and I’m going to use this wonderful instrument to remind you of that fact. A descendent of Motorola’s walkie-talkie work for the military (and looking like it), the DynaTAC, designed by Rudy Krolopp, came on the market in 1984, at just below $4,000 and 28 ounces. 

from SLATE

The LUCITE CLAMSHELL PHONE is a beautiful collectible from 50 years ago that reminds many of us just how quickly things have changed. We look forward to showing you this great piece and any collection ‘of our many collections’ that you might want to peruse. Yes… we are watchin’ for ya!

Like to Sew?

Well, maybe you don’t like to sew. But these thread cabinets could easily be upcycled for any unique project you might have.

DID YOU KNOW THREAD SPOOLS WERE ONCE RECYCLED?

It was not until about 1800 that manufactured cotton thread was available to the hand sewers in the United States and Europe. Before that, textiles were sewn with silk or linen thread, and rarely homespun cotton or wool thread. At first, they were sold in hanks as some yarns still are. Thread came on wooden spools beginning about 1820. Like our beverage bottles, the spools could be returned for a deposit, to be refilled. In the mid-19th century, during the Industrial Revolution, textile manufacturing processes were some of the first to be modernized including the manufacture of cotton sewing thread.

from Post-Journal
Beautiful 1800s vintage sewing thread display case at Bahoukas Antiques.

What Ideas Might You Have?

Maybe you collect small items and the drawers would be perfect to store them and pull them out for display. Or possibly, you love notepaper and cards. These drawers might be perfect for keeping your collection. OR!!! Possibly a perfect place to store sheets of wrapping paper or even your artwork!

Love More History of Threads?

Photo from ScienceHistory.org showing a man working at DuPont's nylon production plant in Wilmington, DE, 1938
Images from DuPont’s nylon production plant in Wilmington, Delaware, 1938 (clockwise from top left). Mike McCall pours nylon chips into a hopper; the chips will be melted, measured out and filtered before being spun into filament. An unidentified worker oversees the operation of a draw twister, which twists polymer fibers into thread. Violet Grenda inspects skeins of nylon yarn.
Joseph X. Labovsky Collection, Science History Institute

DuPont in Wilmington, DE in the 1940s manufactured fully synthetic nylon thread. During WWII it was very difficult for women to get hosiery because they were made from silk thread, imported from Japan. DuPont worked to create a substitute that we know as ‘nylon stockings.’ If I remember correctly, the late Phil Barker, a former mayor of Havre de Grace, first worked at DuPont. He started out just cleaning, working up to ‘doffing’ – removing empty spools from the machines.

Of course, you probably have a very unique idea for using one or both of these beautiful 1800s sewing thread cabinets. Let us know how YOU might use them! Yes, we’re here and we’re watchin’ for ya!

Are You A Petrolianan?

Okay, maybe that’s not a real word. But a person who collects “petroliana” is collecting gasoline and the oil business memborabilia.

Gas Stations on Every Corner

In the early days of automobile travel, service stations were unfamiliar and often poorly lit at night. So lighted gas-pump globes and other oil company signage were key to reassuring and drawing in motorists. And since pumping gas was a new experience, early pumps allowed motorists to see if the gasoline was clean (through a small glass window), and later to watch the price as the gas was pumped (a major innovation).

from Collectors Weekly

Do you remember when every busy intersection had a gas station on each corner? How many different brand names do you remember?

Reproduction gasoline signs - Firebird, Esso - at Bahoukas in Havre de Grace
Reproduction Gasoline Signage at Bahoukas

We wonder if there will be similar scenes where there will be electric charging stations everywhere designed to keep our cars and trucks moving? What do you think?

Stop in and chat. Since a number of folks ask for these fun collectibles, we found a nice selection for you to browse. Think holiday gift-giving!! It’s not too early to start – after all, 14 weekends from now you’ll be open gifts under the tree. WOW! And, of course, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

What Can We Learn From Old Newspapers?

Bahoukas has just received an interesting collection of old newspapers.

Ephemera

Old newspapers can give us the feel of a particular time period, details of history from the news stories and editorials, and a good deal about life through their ads and human interest stories. So why do people collect them?

Well, often they’ve kept papers from a historical period – a war, presidential news, disasters, and such. Sometimes a newspaper may connect to a particular birthdate, death, a favorite sports team, and other more personal topics.

Kennedy Assassination

Photo of the newspaper: The Philadelphia Inquirer of Nov, 23, 1963 - Kennedy Shot to Death - Johnson is Sworn in as President

Newspaper: The New York Times, Nov. 24, 1963 - headlines: Kennedy's Body Lies in White House; Johnson at Helm with Wide Backing; Police Say Prinsoner is the Assassin
newspaper Delaware County Daily Times, Mon. Nov 25, 1963
Headline: Kennedy's Assassin Is Dead

LINDBERGH

This 1927 newspaper is in good condition for coming out of someone’s attic.

Japanese Surrender – WWII

newspaper: The New York Times, Wed. Aug. 15, 1945 
Headlines: Japan Surrenders, End of War! Emperor Accepts Allied Rule; M'Arthur Supreme Commander; Our Manpower Curbs Voided

newspaper: The New York Times, Sun. Sept 2, 1945
Headlines: Japan Surrenders to Allies, Signs Rigid Terms on Warship; Truman Sets Today as V-J Day

We have others in our recently acquired collection of old newspapers. It’s so interesting to read from the very day of these events. In many cases, these are complete newspapers giving you the opportunity to really get the atmosphere in our country surrounding these historic moments!

Why Would Anyone Collect Newspapers?

Sometimes, newspapers writing of historical events were tucked away only to be left in their hideaway for a later generation to discover. But there are collectors who save papers of historical significance. Others collect them for the feel of a particular time period, a birth or obituary, news of someone famous or notorious, and for an event in the family’s life.

There are even collectors who love to save the advertisements, whether for a particular product or brand, or just advertising in general.

Whatever the reasons, we have a rather wonderful collection that, if you love old newspapers, you may want to come in and take a peek. And you can be sure – we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Nascar-Coca Cola

Classy Pedal Car

This amazing Nascar – Coca Cola pedal car is in great condition. What a perfect item for your collection. Or even better – what a wonderful gift for a youngster in your life.

Coca Cola teams up with Nascar and this pedal car is just awesome!
Coca-Cola / Nascar Pedal Car

This was a promotion item used for window displays. Stop in and see if for yourself. Don’t forget, the days are growing shorter and Christmas isn’t really far away! In any case, you know we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

L.S.M.F.T.

Lucky Strikes Means Fine Tobacco

Do you remember that? We may be smoking less today, but anyone of a ‘certain age’ will remember that slogan for Lucky Strikes cigarettes. Maybe you remember buying a pack of candy cigarettes and riding on your bicycle pretending to be smoking. Okay, okay… maybe you didn’t. (chuckle)

TOBACCIANA

2 corn cob pipes, wood-carved pipe available at Bahoukas
2 corn cob pipes and a wood-carved pipe

Tobacciana is the collecting of anything tobacco-related. Old tins, cigarette packs, cigarette papers, pipes, ashtrays, tobacco tins, etc.

Choosing a favorite among tobacco memorabilia may be the most challenging aspect of this hobby. From the art to the accessories, selecting which items to collect is a great challenge. 

from go-star.com
cigar ash tray, corn cob and wood carved pipes, smoking tobacco pack and cigarette pack, hand-carved vuffalo and owl pipes
corn cob and wood-carved pipes, cigarettes, smoking tobacco, cigar ashtray, hand-carved buffalo and owl pipes.
close-up of the buffalo and owl hand-carved pipes

If you really want to delve into the world of Tobacciana, you may want to check out this Tobacco Pipe Glossary. In the meantime, stop in and see just what we have in our Tobacciana Collection! Of course, we’re watchin’ for ya and can’t wait to say, “Welcome to Bahoukas!”

Vintage Photos & Tintypes

Why Collect Old Photos?

If you’ve browsed an antique shop, you’ve most likely noticed the old photos in boxes, stacked in corners. You’ve also most likely been drawn to one or two, wondering where the place is or who are those people. You may have even commented on their attire or the sternness in their expression. The article connected to the following quote is a very easy and interesting read.

The People Who Collect Strangers’ Memories

In gathering old photographs of daily life, family scenes, and illness, hobbyists get an intimate view into past lives.

from The ATlantic
photo that looks like an old school building c. 1906
c. 1906 – looks like an old school building

There are many reasons old photographs are collected. Some folks are looking for certain locations while others may be collecting a category, say, a particular advertising, old motorcycles, vintage farm photos, portraits. You name it, someone’s collecting it.

But we’re most assuredly pulled into wondering about the story behind the photo.

photo of a Farrell Auto Co. advertising BUICK
Farrell Auto Co. photo advertising BUICK
vintage photos of people
Vintage photos – don’t you wonder about who they are?

What To Do With The Found Vintage Photos You Love

Feeling crafty? This article gives some great ways to incorporate those vintage photos into your decor. CLICK HERE for the article from salvagedliving.com

TINTYPES

Tintypes

We also have a few tintypes in our store. Do you know what “tintypes” are?

tintype, also known as a melainotype or ferrotype, is a photograph made by creating a direct positive on a thin sheet of metal coated with a dark lacquer or enamel and used as the support for the photographic emulsion. Tintypes enjoyed their widest use during the 1860s and 1870s, but lesser use of the medium persisted into the early 20th century and it has been revived as a novelty and fine art form in the 21st.

from wikipedia

It might also be of interest to you to learn why tintypes are so special.

Tintypes are a very early type of antique photograph dating back to the late 19th century. 

… There is no negative in the tintype process, making each one a rare, one-of-a-kind photograph. Tintypes are valuable capsules of history and should only be directly worked on by an archival specialist. Today virtually all tintype images needing restoration are restored digitally on the computer.

from Our EveryDay Life

CLICK HERE for an intriguing article that explains much more about the markings on a tintype and also how to get some clues from the photo. It’s a really interesting piece.

So there you have it. We have vintage photos and a few tintypes. Stop in and see if something catches your fancy or adds to a particular collection you may have. In the meantime, be assured. We’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Might You Be A Deltiologist?

OOOOooooo… DELTIOLOGIST – another fun word.

Deltiology … is the study and collection of postcards. Professor Randall Rhoades of Ashland, Ohio, coined a word in 1945 that became the accepted description of the study of picture postcards. It initially took about 20 years for the name to appear in a dictionary.

from wikipedia

Our feature photo shows a variety of postcards for different holidays. But we have plenty more throughout the store.

Postcards are considered “ephemera:”

things that exist or are used or enjoyed for only a short time.”there were papers, letters, old boxes—all sorts of ephemera”

from a Google Search
Beautiful Vintage Postcards at Bahoukas Antique Mall in Havre de Grace
Beautiful Vintage Postcards

Crafty?

Are you wondering what you might do with old postcards? Check out this article that offers 16 PROJECTS. Some of the ideas mentioned include scrapbooking, decoupage, origami, and framing them to display.

We look forward to showing you our collections of postcards. And absolutely, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Helixophile? You?

Corkscrews have a long history.

Its design may have derived from the gun worm which was a device used by men to remove unspent charges from a musket’s barrel in a similar fashion, from at least the early 1630s

The corkscrew is possibly an English invention, due to the tradition of beer and cider, and Treatise on Cider by John Worlidge in 1676 describes “binning of tightly corked cider bottles on their sides”, although the earliest reference to a corkscrew is, “steel worm used for the drawing of Corks out of Bottles” from 1681.

In 1795, the first corkscrew patent was granted to the Reverend Samuel Henshall, in England. The clergyman affixed a simple disk, now known as the Henshall Button, between the worm and the shank. The disk prevents the worm from going too deep into the cork, forces the cork to turn with the turning of the crosspiece, and thus breaks the adhesion between the cork and the neck of the bottle. The disk is designed and manufactured slightly concave on the underside, which compresses the top of the cork and helps keep it from breaking apart.

from Wikipedia
intricately designed handle on a corkscrew

INTRICATE

This beautiful handle on this corkscrew
is beautifully crafted.

CARICATURES

Quite often corkscrews were created with various characters, symbols, or logos.

We don’t think this one is from Havre de Grace, even though the BOWMAN name is familiar here!

Just like all other items, a corkscrew was often great advertising. This one from Bowman Hotels is easily carried to be used anywhere. Picnic anyone?

Think you might be a helixophile

… or want to be? CLICK HERE for a fun article on this very collectible single-purpose tool from NOLA.com.

Might you be wondering about the most expensive corkscrew sold?

Wonder no more:

A heritage corkscrew. When the old London Bridge was demolished in the 1831, its surviving fragment was turned into a corkscrew, which was sold at an auction in Essex, UK for £40,000 (around $62,790), about 100 times its guide price.

from LUXURYLAUNCHES.com

So there you go … more than you ever wanted to know about the familiar corkscrew. But it just might put you on the path to being a helixophile. We’re here to guide you. And you bet, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

John Wayne – actor, director, producer, SINGER?

179…

Are you aware that John Wayne was in 179 film and tv productions? And he wasn’t always a cowboy! The above photo is from The Quiet Man movie – filmed in Ireland. The link below the following quote will take you to an interesting article regarding 100 of his movies.

Have you seen them all?

The controversial film star was most famous for his roles in Westerns, but also starred in war dramas, took on the role of an American boxer in “The Quiet Man,” and put himself on the other side of the camera as a producer and director. Wayne was nominated three times for Academy Awards, winning once for lead actor in 1969 when he played U.S. Marshal Reuben “Rooster” J. Cogburn in “True Grit.” He was even posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1980 by Jimmy Carter.

from slacker.com
A lobby card for John Wayne and James Stewart for the movie, Who Shot Liberty Valence, in German
A lobby card (in German) for the movie “Who Shot Liberty Valence”
… available in our shop
John Wayne 18" Ensco chalk figure 19702

John Wayne

18″ Ensco chalk figure 1970s
available in our shop!

Do you know John Wayne’s birth name? (Answer at the bottom of this post)

John Wayne American Collector Watch
John Wayne American Collector Watch
John Wayne - Sheriff of Graham County Arizona - collector's piece
John Wayne Collector Figure
(both have dome covers)

… and a SINGER? Yep!

Another fun item is our selection of Collector Plates.

a number of John Wayne Collector Plates
A collection of beautiful Collector Plates: John Wayne

So if you, or someone you know, grew up loving everything “John Wayne,” stop in and have a peek at these great collector items. Yessireeeeee…. we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

John Wayne’s given name was Marion Robert Morrison! Did you guess it?

Lunch Boxes Started with Dads in Coal Mines

…working men protected their lunches from the perils of the job site (just imagine what a coal mine or a quarry could do to a guy’s sandwich) with heavy-duty metal pails.

from SmithonianMagazine
Historic lunchbox, 1880s. A tobacco box was recycled as lunch box. Harold Dorwin / SI
Historic lunchbox, 1880s. A tobacco box was recycled as lunch box.
Harold Dorwin / SI

Soon after…

Around the 1880s, school children who wanted to emulate their daddies fashioned similar caddies out of empty cookie or tobacco tins. According to the timeline, the first commercial lunch boxes, which resembled metal picnic baskets decorated with scenes of playing children, came out in 1902.

from SmithonianMagazine

The American History Museum of the Smithsonian Institute houses the lunchbox collection. For information to visit, CLICK HERE!

lunchboxes by the score at Bahoukas Antiques in Havre de Grace
Wonderful selection of lunchboxes at Bahoukas!

We’ve written a great deal about lunchboxes and shared our collection in previous posts.

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Do you have a favorite boo character/tv show/celebrity collectible lunchbox? Or maybe you’ve been looking for one? Stop in and visit us soon to see our extensive collection.

Metal and Plastic Lunch Boxes at Bahoukas
More lunchboxes from the collection at Bahoukas.

Yes, we are watchin’ for ya! And don’t forget, school is right around the corner. Possibly your youngster would love to have a lunchbox from Bahoukas!