Calipers – Micrometers – Tools … oh my

Bahoukas received a beautiful collection of calipers and micrometers recently to add to some we already had. It’s a wonderful collection.

Don’t know what they are?

Calipers

Calipers were used as early as the 6th century BC by the Greeks and Romans, according to Wikipedia.

Calipers (photo courtesy of Pixabay)

caliper (British spelling also calliper, or in plurale tantum sense a pair of calipers) is a device used to measure the dimensions of an object.

Many types of calipers permit reading out a measurement on a ruled scale, a dial, or a digital display. Some calipers can be as simple as a compass with inward or outward-facing points, but no scale. The tips of the caliper are adjusted to fit across the points to be measured and the dimension read by measuring between the tips with another measuring tool, such as a ruler.

It is used in many fields such as mechanical engineer-ing, metalworking, forestry, woodworking, science and medicine.

from Wikipedia

Micrometers

Micrometer (courtesy of Pixabay)

The first ever micrometric screw was invented by William Gascoigne in the 17th century, as an enhancement of the vernier; it was used in a telescope to measure angular distances between stars and the relative sizes of celestial objects.

from Wikipedia

micrometer, sometimes known as a micrometer screw gauge, is a device incorporating a calibrated screw widely used for accurate measurement of components in mechanical engineering and machining as well as most mechanical trades, along with other metrological instruments such as dial, vernier, and digital calipers. Micrometers are usually, but not always, in the form of calipers (opposing ends joined by a frame). The spindle is a very accurately machined screw and the object to be measured is placed between the spindle and the anvil. The spindle is moved by turning the ratchet knob or thimble until the object to be measured is lightly touched by both the spindle and the anvil.

Micrometers are also used in telescopes or microscopes to measure the apparent diameter of celestial bodies or microscopic objects. The micrometer used with a telescope was invented about 1638 by William Gascoigne, an English astronomer. 

from Wikipedia

Here’s a detailed video with information for both inside and outside calipers and micrometers. Most likely, more than you ever wanted to know unless you’re a user of these great instruments. But a perfect primer for appreciating these amazing instruments.

Now that you know all you ever wanted to know about calipers and micrometers, stop in and visit to view our collection. Rain or shine, yep, we’re watchin’ for ya!

Unique Jacks

This selection of jacks is pretty unique. The center one is a train jack, the outside ones are car jacks.

Vintage Train Jack
vintage car jack
Vintage Car Jack
vintage car jack
Vintage Car Jack

These are certainly unique to our shop. Have someone on your gift list that just might be looking for one of these. Stop in today and pick it up. In the meantime, check out the great restoration in the video below. Beautiful!

All of Us at Bahoukas wish you a safe and wonderful Holiday!

Remember, we’re closed on Christmas Day and New Years Day. Give us a call if you’re stopping by Christmas Eve or New Year’s Eve to be sure we didn’t sneak out early! Yeah, we like to celebrate, too. And yes, we’re watchin’ for ya. So hurry in!

Do You Love Manual Typewriters?

The above photo is a 1910 Oliver Typewriter available in our store. Here’s a great quote from a collector’s website:

Towards the end of the nineteenth century, the typewriter industry was developing rapidly. Before the Oliver typewriter entered the market, text remained hidden from the typist on the underside of the platen as it was typeset until the platen was lifted. This design was convention across many successful typewriter brands of the era. However, the typewriting industry was soon revolutionized by Reverend Thomas Oliver and his eponymous invention. The Oliver typewriter features two towers of typebars which strike down onto the platen, allowing the text to remain visible at all times. With this iconic typing mechanism, the Oliver become known as The Standard Visible Writer.

from Olivertypewriters.com

History of Manual Typewriters

The history of manual typewriters began in 1575, when an Italian printmaker, Francesco Rampazetto, invented a machine to impress letters on papers. Not until 1714 did a Brit named Henry Mill take out a patent for a machine similar to a typewriter. 

from Writers-Alliance.org

It was until 1874 that these typewriters were commercially introduced to Europe and America. By the early 1900s, the electric typewriter would hit the market.

Tom Thumb Cash Registers and Typewriter

Did you ever get one of these for a Christmas gift? The cash registers came first to be followed in 1953 with the Tom Thumb Typewriter.

Tom Thumb toy typewriter by Western Stamping Co
Tom Thumb toy typewriter by Western Stamping Co.

It was the beginning of the glory days of the durable metal Tom Thumb toy cash register, manufactured exclusively at Western Stamping Co., 2203 W. Michigan Ave.

“I bet they made 600,000 of those cash registers a year for at least 10 years,” said Edna Whiting, 86, of Blackman Township, daughter of Arthur Poole, a company founder.

… The toy cash register’s keys were first attached one at a time. By 1953, they were attached in one process, which upped production and enabled the company to produce half a million cash registers and 100,000 typewriters that year.

from Peek Through Time: Toys fom Western Stamping
Royal manual typewriter 1963
1963 Royal Manual Typewriter

Royal Typewriters

Many of us “boomers” probably remember the heavy black Royal typewriter. They seemed to last FOREVER! This interesting quote may help explain why:

To promote the ruggedness of its typewriters, George Edward Smith, president of Royal bought a Ford-Stout tri-motor airplane in August 1927. This plane will drop over 200 typewriters in crates with parachutes to dealers over the eastern seaboard of the USA. Royal will eventually deliver over 11,000 this way with only 10 being damaged.

from Royal.com

WOW! That’s quite a promotion!!!

Writers and Their Typewriters

Many famous writers used their typewriters, often long after the computer arrived.

Author Will Self explains why writers use a manual typewriter: “I think the computer user does their thinking on the screen, and the non-computer user is compelled, because he or she has to retype a whole text, to do a lot more thinking in the head.”

from Writers Alliance

In 1883, Mark Twain was the first to present his ‘typewritten manuscript” to a publisher. The book? Life on the Mississippi

And did you know that J.R.R. Tolkein typed and retyped his Lord of the Rings manually on a typewriter? Jack Kerouac was a speed typist at 100 words per minute!

Read more about writers and the typewriters in the link in the above post.

No matter what the reason: you love to type on a manual typewriter, you’re fascinated by the mechanics themselves, or you’re a collector! Stop by and browse our collection of typewriters. We’re here and we most certainly are watchin’ for ya!

Hand Saws – a useful tool

Carpentry is a skill that came into being when mankind first decided to build, and crude tools were fashioned to help in the process. While early tools were rough, as time went by, the necessity of having better saws led to the more refined handsaw.

from HomeSteady.com

Vintage Hand Saws

We have a variety of hand saws available in the store that can be sharpened and used or appreciated as a decorative item for a home or shop. (Yes, there are ice tongs in this photo – chuckle – you can read about them in an earlier post).

Paintings

… show saws in use as early as Egyptian times! These saws were made of copper and are depicted as a large blade with no handle.

from WonkeeDonkeeTools.co.uk

From cutting trees to building homes…

The hand saw gave mankind the ability to keep warm, cook food, and build homes, barns, churches, and business structures. It’s another tool that we take for granted but was key to our development. Of course, today we have all sorts of electric saws. But we could still build with the hand saw even if we lost ‘the grid.’

By the 1800s, handsaws could be found in almost every home and were used to cut wood for fires as well as building. Various manufacturers such as Sheffield and Cam produced different styles and sizes for different uses, with both flat rectangular edges and sloped rounded end designs. Handles varied as well, some with an opening and others that closed about the hand. Often companies engraved their name across the metal or created fancy curved handles.

from WonkeeDonkeeTools.co.uk

Because of its versatility, the handsaw is still an important tool for carpenters and woodworkers today. Today’s models look very much as they did back in the 18th century, but there are significant differences. Handsaws often have plastic handles and removable blades. The metals are often made to be rust resistant; and they can be thicker or multi-bladed for faster cutting. Some models are able to cut through glass, veneer and even metal.

from HomeSteady.com

Whether you’re a prepper looking for a useful tool, someone who loves decorating with vintage tools, a collector, or a woodworker that appreciates the vintage tools, we invite you to stop in and see what we have. Of course, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Ice for Your Icebox!

The tools pictured are ice tongs and ice saw used to cut blocks of ice from the Susquehanna River when it froze thick enough – ideally 8″ thick! It was hard work. The blocks of ice at 8″ thick would average 2.67 cubic feet and weigh about 150 lbs (considered manageable weight)! This info is included in the book: Heavy Industries of Yesteryear, Harford County’s Rural Heritage, by Jack L. Shagena, Jr. and Henry C. Peden, Jr. (available in our store).

book cover for Heavy Industries of Yesteryear, Harford County's Rural Heritage
Excerpt about ice-harvesting from the book, Heavy Industries of Yesteryear, Harford County's Rural Heritage

Why did we need ice blocks?

1920s icebox

Into the 1930s, households used large blocks of ice to keep food cold in “iceboxes.”

This photo is from the 1920s. Courtesy of the Sloane Collection.

By the end of the 1800s, many American households stored their perishable food in an insulated “icebox” that was usually made of wood and lined with tin or zinc. A large block of ice was stored inside to keep these early refrigerators chilly. By this point, cold had become the clear choice among food preservation methods, proving less labor-intensive and more effective at preventing spoilage. Other techniques, like salting, drying, and canning, erased any appearance of freshness and required more time to prepare. Iceboxes also presented a new way to save prepared foods—or leftovers—that previously might not have lasted beyond one meal.

from AmericanHistory.si.edu

Abbott Bros Ice House

Photo of Abbott Bros Ice House

The above photo is of Abbott Bros Ice House, located where the Havre de Grace Marine Center is on Water Street in Havre de Grace.

For the local history lover on your holiday gift list, at least one of the items featured, the book, and the Abbott Bros Ice House photo (available at Bahoukas) would make an awesome addition to their collection. Talk to George today.

In the meantime, hurry in to find YOUR favorite items for someone on your gift list. And yes, we’re definitely watchin’ for ya!

Tools for the Season

These cast iron kettles are a size 4 and 8. The larger is a Jos Bell & Co.

Heat On? Fireplaces Working?

It’s the season where we begin to crank up the heat. Along with the warm and cozy fireplaces and pellet stoves or even just the welcome heat from your furnace, dry air starts to affect our comfort. Many folks love to put a kettle of water on the stove and let it add a bit of humidity to create a more comfortable – and healthy – home!

These two kettles are definitely up to the task. Come see them for yourself. We also have a number of other cast iron items waiting for you to consider.

Might You Be A Hunter?

Electric Wellsaw model 400 for cutting meat – from the 1950s

Along with cooler temps, it’s also hunting season. This 1950 Wellsaw model 400 electric saw is for cutting meat. It does work.

You know, here at Bahoukas Antique Mall and Beer MuZeum, you just never know what our ‘collector of collections’ might have in the shop. So hurry in and enjoy a look back while considering how you might use these very collections to make your life forward a bit easier or more fun.

Yep, we’re here – ready to help you find the most unique of holiday gifts. And we’re watchin’ for ya!

Pocket Knives and more

Imperial Knives of Providence RI

We have a full collection of Imperial Knives from the 1970s. These knives were recognized for excellent prices and fair quality. They were made in the U.S. until the late 80s from everything we could find.

Imperial Cutlery has been producing great knives for
incredible prices for over 100 years. 

… The prices are amazing, the quality is fair.
You get more than what you pay for.

from Knives and Tools
Complete Set of Imperial Diamond Edge Knives (1970s) Made in the U.S.

Other Knives in our collection

a variety of useful knives available for Dad at Bahoukas Antiques in Havre de Grace

Pocket Knives

Along with the above Imperial Knives Collection, we have an assortment of other knives from small penknives to larger pocket knives.

A Bit of Pocket Knife History

The earliest known pocket knives date to
at least the early Iron Age.
A pocketknife with a bone handle was found at the Hallstatt Culture type site in Austria, dating to around 600–500 BCE. Iberian folding-blade knives made by indigenous artisans and craftsmen and dating to the pre-Roman era have been found in Spain. Many folding knives from the Viking era have been found. They carried some friction binders, but more often they seem to have used folding knives that used a closure to keep the blade open.

from Wikipedia

Intriguing…

Roman Archeological find of the Roman period of a folding or pocket knife and reconstruction, original found at Gellep, Germany

You know, it’s time to begin your holiday shopping. Do you have an adult in your life that would appreciate the gift of a pocket knife? Well, you know, we’re here and ready to help. Yep, we’re watchin’ for ya!

Helixophile? You?

Corkscrews have a long history.

Its design may have derived from the gun worm which was a device used by men to remove unspent charges from a musket’s barrel in a similar fashion, from at least the early 1630s

The corkscrew is possibly an English invention, due to the tradition of beer and cider, and Treatise on Cider by John Worlidge in 1676 describes “binning of tightly corked cider bottles on their sides”, although the earliest reference to a corkscrew is, “steel worm used for the drawing of Corks out of Bottles” from 1681.

In 1795, the first corkscrew patent was granted to the Reverend Samuel Henshall, in England. The clergyman affixed a simple disk, now known as the Henshall Button, between the worm and the shank. The disk prevents the worm from going too deep into the cork, forces the cork to turn with the turning of the crosspiece, and thus breaks the adhesion between the cork and the neck of the bottle. The disk is designed and manufactured slightly concave on the underside, which compresses the top of the cork and helps keep it from breaking apart.

from Wikipedia
intricately designed handle on a corkscrew

INTRICATE

This beautiful handle on this corkscrew
is beautifully crafted.

CARICATURES

Quite often corkscrews were created with various characters, symbols, or logos.

We don’t think this one is from Havre de Grace, even though the BOWMAN name is familiar here!

Just like all other items, a corkscrew was often great advertising. This one from Bowman Hotels is easily carried to be used anywhere. Picnic anyone?

Think you might be a helixophile

… or want to be? CLICK HERE for a fun article on this very collectible single-purpose tool from NOLA.com.

Might you be wondering about the most expensive corkscrew sold?

Wonder no more:

A heritage corkscrew. When the old London Bridge was demolished in the 1831, its surviving fragment was turned into a corkscrew, which was sold at an auction in Essex, UK for £40,000 (around $62,790), about 100 times its guide price.

from LUXURYLAUNCHES.com

So there you go … more than you ever wanted to know about the familiar corkscrew. But it just might put you on the path to being a helixophile. We’re here to guide you. And you bet, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Need Ideas for the Guys?

Bahoukas has some fine choices!

motorcycle models
Motorcycle models

Maybe you can’t get him the ‘real’ one… but we have some models that would make perfect stocking stuffers!

Duck decoys

Our selection of duck decoys is limited but very interesting. Stop in to see what we have!

Pulaski Saga by RF Lackey
Bob Lackey is known by many in Harford and Cecil County and definitely by residents of Havre de Grace. We carry his books – the entire series. This is a great historical fiction series that starts in the canal days of Havre de Grace and is truly a wonderful way to get a feeling of what life was like in those years gone by.
huge collection of beer taps at Bahoukas Beer MuZeum in Havre de Grace, MD
Of course, our Brewmania collection… well stop in and see for yourself!

Bahoukas’ Beer MuZeum is amazing! Huge selection of brewmania for any man cave! Whether a collector or just adding to the ambiance, we have something that will work!

We have several slot machines and jukeboxes.

Stop by and check them out. Nope – won’t fit in a stocking, but just might be the perfect gift!

A variety of old tools useful still today at Bahoukas
Vintage tools are always of interest … stop in and see if we have something
that guy on your list can use – or to add a bit of interest to the decor!
We can help you with your choices.
Fishing Lures by Heddon - great collection - Bahoukas Antique Mall
Heddon Fishing Lures

The fisherman (or woman) in your life may be VERY familiar with these lures. Stop by and check them out. They are a collector’s dream Perfect extra thoughtful gift!

Of course, these gifts aren’t limited to the guys. And remember, we have over 9,000 sq ft of items to discover. When Thanksgiving is over, we’ll be ready to help you with your holiday shopping. Join us for Black Friday, Small Business Saturday… or ANY day that you’re in the mood to discover the perfect gift. (We promise not to tell you bought something for yourself while you were here!)

And yes, we’re here… and we’re watchin’ for ya! Happy Thanksgiving!

Keys and Locks

We’ve heard it said that “Locks don’t keep the thief out. They know how to open locks. Locks keep the morale person from being tempted.”

Variety of locks including RR locks (B& O, PARR, Southern Rio Grand Pacific, a showcase lock and even handcuffs
Wonderful variety of locks and keys at Bahoukas Antiques

We’ve posted several items related to locks and keys. Consider these links:
Above photo: CLICK HERE Below: CLICK HERE

skeleton keys at Bahoukas
Some are looking for the key to open a chest or a door.
Others just love collecting skelton keys.

The above links share interesting tidbits about padlocks, master locks, and skeleton keys. Take a peek, the stop by and see these items for yourself. Of course, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Celebrate Vintage Tools

Visit Steppingstone Farm Museum …

for their Fall Festival –
Saturday & Sunday, Sept 28-29

As you recover from this past weekend’s amazing weather, we know you’re already thinking of what to do next weekend. We share these ideas – a visit to Steppingstone Farm Museum for their Fall Festival. Then stop in and see what we have available in vintage tools. Of course, we have thousands of square feet of other items …

antique and vintage tools for the craftsman
Vintage tools including planers, ice tongs, and more

CLICK THIS LINK for a variety of vintage tools that we have. Then visit us at Bahoukas Antique Mall for amazing vintage tools. Yep, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Miscellaneous collectible tools
Miscellaneous vintage tools

What do cigars, shoes, and sausage have in common?

Great Vintage Tools

Cobbler’s Cast Iron Shoe Repair Stands

This set of cobbler’s shoe repair stands would make a very interesting display in the right setting.

Sausage Press/Juice Press

This press has been painted, but it’s really beautiful!

This press isn’t exactly the one we have, but you get the idea.
It’s also been powder-coated for durability and looks amazing!

A unique cigar press

A small cast iron cigar press.

How’s it Done?
Creating cigars, as you may know, is a process that takes months and even years. After our sweet tobacco leaves are primed from the fields, they are sorted, cured, fermented, sorted again, and bunched. It is here that we differ from the regular cigar and get into box-press. Once ‘bunched’, the filler is rolled in its binder; a standard cigar will be pressed into shape in a mold and this will be its final shape. The molds are stacked sometimes 25 high for an allotted time. The stacking allows for pressure to be distributed evenly. From here the cigar is trimmed and paired with its wrapper. Where box-pressing differs is the compression methods used to make the iconic square shape. Box-pressing is only ever done on a stronger leaf; a broadleaf wrapper is far too delicate to withstand the pressing process.

Standard Box-Pressing
This method is very similar to pressing your regular cigar. Once the screaming newborn stogie has its wrapper, it’s snugly placed in its box, while multiple boxes are stacked and placed on a manually controlled press with just enough pressure to form a tight seal and avoid breakage.

from Famous-Smoke.com
How and why to box press a cigar

So as you see, here at Bahoukas Antique Mall, you just never know what you’ll find. Stop by soon and see these unique vintage tools for yourself. Great collectibles, unique items, and definitely conversation starters! Yep, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Wood Tools and

Crocks, Jugs and more

Miscellaneous collectible tools
Collection of Wood Tools and more…

For the woodworker, we have a variety of vintage tools plus a few others. Come check out our collection and see if we’ve got one to add to yours!

very collectible jugs, crocks, bowls and more at Bahoukas
A small portion of our pottery, jugs and crocks!

It’s been awhile since we’ve posted a selection of our crocks and jugs. But we have some beautiful items. In the coming blustery days, if you’re braving the weather, come on by. Yep, We’ll be watchin’ for ya!

It’s All About the Teeth

Saw Teeth, That Is!

At Bahoukas, we have a nice selection of old tools including a few saws. 

A saw is a tool consisting of a tough blade, wire, or chain with a hard toothed edge. It is used to cut through material, very often wood though sometimes metal or stone. The cut is made by placing the toothed edge against the material and moving it forcefully forth and less forcefully back or continuously forward. This force may be applied by hand, or powered by steam, water, electricity or other power source. An abrasive saw has a powered circular blade designed to cut through metal or ceramic.    from Wikipedia

A variety of collectible, and useful, hand saws available at Bahoukas Antique Mall in Havre de Grace

The above photo includes 2-man (person) saws and an ice saw. Below we have  an electric meat saw (used by a butcher).

electric meat saw from Bahoukas Antique Mall

At this time of year, I think of all the folks gathering and chopping wood to be prepared for the colder days and the long winter nights. What’s the poem about your wood chopping efforts? Oh yea, it warms you when you cut it and again when you heat with it. But the following is from Almanac.com and we think that’s probably much more accurate: 

I figure that this wood will warm me seven times.

1. Cut
2. Split
3. Put into truck
4. Take out of truck
5. Bring into basement
6. Stack
7. Burn

But just like those who knit and crochet, or color intricate designs, cutting wood can also be very satisfying as noted in the following quote:

I spend a lot of time doing carpentry. Sometimes there is nothing that gives me the contentment that sawing a piece of wood does.  Abbas Kiarostami

We look forward to showing you all the wonderful, old tools available at Bahoukas. So stop in soon. Someone may love one of these under their Christmas Tree. Oh wait, maybe they need one to ‘cut the tree!’ In any case, yep, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

 

You Never Know What Bahoukas Might Have!

Home Milk Pasteurizer from the Schlueter Co. of Wisconsin available at Bahoukas Antique Mall in Havre de Grace, MDAlways tell us what you’re looking for…

You just never know what might be discovered when you’re searching our shelves. High up on one of those shelves, we discovered a Home Pasteurizer by The Schlueter Co. of Wisconsin. Used for pasteurizing raw milk, we’ve discovered that they still make these. 

… If you traveled through even fairly large cities around the year 1900, you would often come across something now illegal in most urban areas: milk cows. Dairy animals were not uncommon in cities, and it was often the task of young children to lead the animals to whatever grassy areas were available on the edge of town so they could graze.

In the last hundred years of urban migration, the number of home or small farm dairies has been greatly reduced. Who needed to keep a cow when it was so much simpler just to buy milk from the grocery store? As the population of rural areas emptied into urban centers, Americans became more and more disconnected from the source of all their dairy products… as well as more concerned about the quality of those products as dairies became enormous commercialized enterprises.  

from Self Reliant School

The above quote is from an article that gives the many sides of the raw vs pasteurized vs homogenized milk. If you’re one of those folks who take self-reliance and personal responsibility very seriously, we have a tool you might need. 

We also found this information from Mother Earth News website:

…It’s actually very easy to pasteurize your own milk on the stovetop. An added bonus is that your milk won’t need to stand up to long distance shipping and prolonged storage, so you can pasteurize it safely using lower heat and less time than many industrial milk producers use. All you need is a stainless steel pot and a simple kitchen thermometer.

So there you have it: the tool or the recipe! 

Of course, we keep telling you about all the surprises waiting for you to discover at Bahoukas Antique Mall and Beer MuZeum. You can be sure, we’ll be watchin’ for ya. Stop in soon!

The Telegraph – replaced the Semaphore

FIRST – the SEMAPHORE

Developed in the early 1790s, the semaphore consisted of a series of hilltop stations that each had large movable arms to signal letters and numbers and two telescopes with which to see the other stations. Like ancient smoke signals, the semaphore was susceptible to weather and other factors that hindered visibility. A different method of transmitting information was needed to make regular and reliable long-distance communication workable.
from History.com

Here is a U.S. Navy training video for using flags to signal:


 

Can you imagine communicating hilltop to hilltop?

It’s hard for us to picture such a life today, especially when having our phones unavailable for 15 minutes has us acting like we’re lost! Enter the telegraph machine – the beginning of the more reliable and more easily accessible communications. 

telegraph machine - see it at Bahoukas Antique Mall in Havre de Grace

 

In 1843, Morse and Vail received funding from the U.S. Congress to set up and test their telegraph system between Washington, D.C., and Baltimore, Maryland. On May 24, 1844, Morse sent Vail the historic first message: “What hath God wrought!” The telegraph system subsequently spread across America and the world, aided by further innovations. 

The electric telegraph transformed how wars were fought and won and how journalists and newspapers conducted business. Rather than taking weeks to be delivered by horse-and-carriage mail carts, pieces of news could be exchanged between telegraph stations almost instantly. The telegraph also had a profound economic effect, allowing money to be “wired” across great distances.

Did you know? SOS, the internationally recognized distress signal, does not stand for any particular words. Instead, the letters were chosen because they are easy to transmit in Morse code: “S” is three dots, and “O” is three dashes.

from History.com

From this invention, communication changed rapidly moving on to the telephone, fax machine, and now the internet. 

Here’s an intriguing explanation of using the Morse Code on a telegraph machine. The descriptive images are as interesting as the lesson! Enjoy!

Stop in and see this fascinating piece of our recent history. We’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Tools and Instruments

What’s YOUR Interest?

A simple machine is a mechanical device that changes the direction or magnitude of a force. In general, they are the simplest mechanisms that use mechanical advantage (also called leverage) to multiply force. The six classical simple machines which were defined by Renaissance scientists are:

Lever
Wheel and axle
Pulley
Inclined plane
Wedge
Screw

from Wikipedia

The simple machine was the beginning. We could take a simple machine and multiply our efforts. Then …

Substitution as makeshift is when human ingenuity comes into play and a tool is used for its unintended purpose such as a mechanic using a long screw driver to separate a cars control arm from a ball joint instead of using a tuning fork. In many cases, the designed secondary functions of tools are not widely known. As an example of the former, many wood-cutting hand saws integrate a carpenter’s square by incorporating a specially shaped handle that allows 90° and 45° angles to be marked by aligning the appropriate part of the handle with an edge and scribing along the back edge of the saw. The latter is illustrated by the saying “All tools can be used as hammers.” Nearly all tools can be used to function as a hammer, even though very few tools are intentionally designed for it and even fewer work as well as the original.

from Wikipedia

Here, at Bahoukas Antique Mall, we have a variety of tools for nearly every need. We have a wonderful assortment of vintage tools used for woodworking. But check these out for a different peek at what you might find on a shelf :

Collectible microscope at Bahoukas Antique Mall in Havre de Grace, MD  Comptometer - Bahoukas Antique Mall in Havre de Grace  Vintage blood pressure cuff at Bahoukas in Havre de Grace, MD 

On the left is a beautiful microscope that just might delight a young person learning a bit of science! In the center, well, this is quite the calculator. What we can do on our smartphones is so much more than the efforts made with the Comptometer! Here’s a great video explain the mechanics behind the Comptometer. You can see how the ‘simple machines’ noted above make up the way these machines worked.

 

Do you wonder how you use them? Here’s another video. You can advance to around 3 minutes to see how to use it. 

 And finally, we have an old version of a tool/instrument to read your blood pressure. It’s intriguing to see wrist cuffs now that do the same. 

Keep in mind, that tools started with the simplest machines noted above. Later, when you added steam, electricity, transistors, all leading to the computer age and the use of chips. Tools and instruments are fascinating. If you’re an older person, you’ll remember many of these transitions. If you’re a younger person, it might be fun to understand the development required to have the amazing tools you use today!

Hey, stop in and visit us at Bahoukas Antique Mall and Beer MuZeum. We love chatting. And yes, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Implements and Tools

Unique and Interesting

The variety of implements and tools are wide and varied in our antique mall. The above slides include a spinning wheel, butter churn from the early 1800s, coffee grinder, kerosene heater, minnow basket, a wheel from an assembly line belt from FW Smith & Son (out of Belcamp), a 150-year-old cask that sits on a table and in the photo is sitting on a table that would have held large barrels (from Europe and over 200 years old).

Did you notice the clothes washer? It’s a 1950s electro mite portable, electric, washing machine. The tub holds 4 gallons of water and sits in the base that is a motor that agitates the tub, washing the clothes. That’s it – add a bit of detergent to the water, add clothes, plug in and agitate – easier than a washboard! 

This is an amazing set of implements and tools. 

Stop in and check these out. We’ve plenty of ‘unique’ for you to browse. Yep, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!