Military Clothing

Military Duffel Bag, Jackets, and even a trunk

The previous 3 blog posts gave you a glimpse of our military memorabilia. There’s plenty to browse in our store. Below is a pic of a duffel bag and trunk.

As you prepare to enjoy the first long weekend that announces the promise of summer, don’t forget to take a moment to remember our Veterans who gave the ultimate sacrifice. If you have an opportunity, attend a Memorial Day Ceremony or visit a cemetery.

In the meantime, enjoy safe travels. We look forward to seeing you and – yes – we’re watchin’ for ya!

Military Memorabilia 2

Canteens – Belts – Binoculars – Photos

We have an intriguing variety of Military Memorabilia that includes canteens, binoculars, photos, pictures, caps, leather bags, and more. If you’re a collector, you just might want to stop in and browse.

military binoculars - canteen - caps - music

We have some music albums, and even a set of leather bags, airplane model, and more.

Military memorabilia - airplane model - photos - books - music
Military hats - caps - photos - leather bags

Click this link for more Military Memorabilia

Please remember to take a moment to be still and honor the brave men and women who gave their lives for their country! Be safe in your travels. Remember – we’re here and we’re watchin’ for ya. We look forward to seeing you this weekend.

Military Memorabilia

In Observance of Memorial Day

In keeping with this week’s theme, today’s post includes a few photos of various US Military Memorabilita.

US Military Memorabilia includes, letters, medals, glasses, photos, and more
Military Memorabilia available at Bahoukas Antiques in Havre de Grace

We have photos, medals, newspaper articles, and various military pieces that may be of interest to the collector. Stop in and browse.

Plates, photos, posters, military memorabilia
Lighter, mess kit, ashtray, photos, books, belt, medals and more Military Memorabilia

We’re here and YES…

We’re watchin’ for ya. Hurry in and see our Military Collectibles. Remember those we’ve lost by observing a moment of prayer.

Military Collectibles

From Civil War to WWII and more…

Collecting military items has always been an interest at Bahoukas. From Civil War photos to various headwear, lead and plastic toy soldiers to invalid feeders. Stop by and browse. Take a minute to chat with George.

canteens and more
Canteens and other gear in our military section at Bahoukas

It’s amazing the variety of items we have. Along with the above canteens, belts, etc., Bahoukas also has currency (including WWII Japanese currency), military books, military DUI, and patches. CLICK HERE for posts related to our military category.

Stop in soon. We’re here… and we’re watchin’ for ya!

Military DUI, Patches, and more

Bahoukas Antique Mall & Beer MuZeum has a military collection worth browsing. This recent collection includes a variety of DUI – Distinctive Unit Insignias including many from WWII, a Coast Guard Cap, Awards Ribbons, A Unit Patch (we have many more), a Cap Badge, and a Spec 5 Patch.

WWII Distinctive Unit Insignia
WWII Distinctive Unit Insignia
WWII Distinctive Unit Insignia
WWII Distinctive Unit Insignia

distinctive unit insignia (DUI) is a metal heraldic device worn by soldiers in the United States Army. The DUI design is derived from the coat of arms authorized for a unit. DUIs may also be called “distinctive insignia” (DI), a “crest” or a “unit crest” by soldiers or collectors. The term “crest” however, in addition to being incorrect, may be misleading, as a DUI is an insignia in its own right rather than a heraldic crest. The term “crest” properly refers to the portion of an achievement of arms which stands atop the helmet over the shield of arms. (Nevertheless, a minority of DUIs happen to depict crests, such as those of many National Guard state area commands.) The U.S. Army Institute of Heraldry is responsible for the design, development and authorization of all DUIs.

From Military Wikia
WWII Distinctive Unit Insignia
WWII Distinctive Unit Insignia
WWII Distinctive Unit Insignia
WWII Distinctive Unit Insignia
Unit Patch - blue star on white with red border - we have many more here at Bahoukas
Unit Patch – we have many more
Spec 5 Rank Patch
Spec 5 Rank Patch

Here’s a link to our Military Posts.

MILITARY LINK – Some of these items may no longer be available, but you’ll get a pretty good idea of the variety of Military Collectibles that we have. And we’re always receiving more.

Stop in over Havre de Grace’s Independence Weekend Celebrations and browse the shop. We’ll be watchin’ for ya. And just so you don’t miss out on anything, here’s the schedule of events!

Havre de Grace July 4 Weekend Events

Salute to Our Military

Please Take A Moment

Poppy - Lest We Forget - Memorial Day - Bahoukas Antiques

Yes, it’s a long weekend and there’s sun in the forecast. But it’s also a Holiday set aside for us to remember those of our military who have made the ultimate sacrifice. We encourage you to take a moment to sit quietly, remember and honor those courageous men and women. Shake a hand, share a hug, or just say “Thank You” to a family member or friend who is honoring the loss of a military loved one on this special day.

For those who love anything ‘military,’ here at Bahoukas Antique Mall, we have some interesting collectibles.

Books to Belt Buckles and other military collectibles at Bahoukas in Havre de Grace

Books, insignia, belts, manuals and more are available in our Military Collectibles. Stop in and see if there’s a special item you’d like to add to your own collection.

Military books and more at Bahoukas Antique Mall

Just looking for an interesting item to add to a table or bookshelf in honor of our Military? Check this out! A stand of flags or the flag and AMERICA sign – either would look great on a picnic table!

Flags, AMERICA sign, and more Military items at Bahoukas in Havre de Grace

Of course, as you enjoy your weekend in Havre de Grace, stop by and browse Bahoukas Antique Mall and Beer MuZeum. Absolutely, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Military Hats – WWI to present day

Do You Remember Wearing Any of These?

military hats - l to r - Kevlar, Army, Navy visor caps, WWI cap

There are those who collect military apparel. But there are those who will have stories to share when they see one of these. Which one might you be?

We have an array of military items that you might want to peruse. But here we have, left to right, a modern Kevlar helmet, an Army visor cap (middle bottom), a Navy visor cap (middle top), and a WWI helmet. Did you ever wonder how Kevlar is so strong and protective. Click on this link to learn “How Kevlar Works.”

Stop in and see this as well as many more very collectible pieces. CLICK THIS LINK to view a great 250 year history of American Army Uniforms from the Business Insider website.

Gifts for the Military Enthusiasts

Civil War through Viet Nam Military Collectibles

Civil War to Viet Nam Military Memorabilia at Bahoukas

This photo does not do justice to the items available in this case of Military Collectibles. Civil War photo, Civil War shooter’s glasses (sun glasses), 1880s American-Indian War Kepi, WWII bayonet and so very much more. If this is your passion, stop in and see what other treasure you may find in this case. George would love to show you!

Father’s Day Meets Bahoukas

Coins to Tools for Dad

At Bahoukas Antique Mall, we can help you cater to Dad! From vintage tools to collectible coins and tokens, fishing poles to decoys and sailboats, or books and magazines on a variety of topics, we’ve got great ideas for you.

This is just a sprinkling of the many items in our shop just in time to create a beautiful gift for dad. Or maybe he collects:

  • Star Wars
  • PEZ
  • Brewmania
  • Cameras
  • Records and albums
  • Boardgames
  • Lighters
  • Military
  • and more….

It’s a beautiful weekend coming up. Stop in soon to pick a special item for that special “Dad” in your life! You bet, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Remembering Those We’ve Lost

Military Books and Magazines

To start off our Memorial Day Observances here at Bahoukas Antique Mall, we will share a few of the books and magazines related to U.S. Wars and Military Stories, Articles, and more. We also have a number of Life Magazines that cover a variety of military events and stories.

You are encouraged to stop by and browse, not only our books but our vintage Military pieces. We’ll be sharing more over the next few days. Of course, we’re always watchin’ for ya!

Collectible Books

Beautiful Raggedy Ann and Andy Books

These familiar books still tickle the fancies of young ones. Yes, they are collectibles, but you can read to them and enjoy. These titles include The Tunnel of Lost Toys, Raggedy Ann’s Wishing Pebble, and Camel with the Wrinkled Knees.

very collectible big-little books featuring Woody Woodpecker, Buck Rogers, Chando the Magician and more
A wonderful selection of big-little books.

Titles that include Chando the Magician, Woody Woodpecker and the Meteor Menace, Buck Rogers – 25th Century A.D., Flying the Sky Clipper with Winsie Atkins, Jungle Jim, Tarzan, and more. These little books are amazing!

Of course, we have shelves of books that include a large selection of children’s stories, Golden Books, Encyclopedias, Cook Books, Military Books. Oh my, you’ll want to allow yourself a bit of time to browse if you love books.

Stop by soon. We’ll be watchin’ for ya, ready to point out the various locations of books – books – books!

Model Plane Kits and more

In the last few months, we’ve acquired several interesting collections. Last week, we shared a few of our motorcycle memorabilia. This week we want to showcase a wonderful assortment of model airplane kits and an interesting magazine.

An assortment of model airplane kits in great condition

These kits include a large percentage of military aircraft. They are from the 1960s and the kits are in great condition.

Did You Know?

Though toy planes might seem like a byproduct of human flight, toys were actually airborne long before we were. In the late 1700s, Sir George Cayley built the first flying top using feathers, cork, and whalebone; by the middle of the following century, a helicopter device launched using a pull-string, called the “Spiralifère,” was a major hit in France. As inventors worked to develop life-size flying machines, they often tested their ideas on a smaller scale, leading to a variety of “mechanical birds” and other plane-like toys during the late 19th century.

from: Collectors Weekly

Unique Magazine Series: Royal Air Force Flying Review

We have a great selection of Flying Review Magazines from the 1960s.

First issue published in 1944 under the title ‘Royal Air Force Review’, but renamed ‘Royal Air Force Flying Review’ by the early 1950’s. Content at this time was a mixture of “ripping yarns” true flying stories and serious features on World War Two and contemporary aircraft types. Through the 1950’s it evolved into a serious enthusiasts magazine, with detailed type profiles, surveys of foreign air forces and assessments of the latest Soviet aircraft. It was renamed ‘Flying Review International’ in September 1963. With its large b+w and colour photos, cutaway drawings and colour profile drawings it became the premier aviation magazine in the UK.

from Aeriflight.co.uk

Evidently, in 1968 it was reformatted and the name changed. By 1970, it was no longer being published. This magazine had very enthusiastic readers.

So whether you want to check out this unique magazine selection or purchase a model plane – or two or three, we’re here and we’re watchin’ for ya. Stop in and we’ll point you to their shelf!

Do Children Still Play With Toy Soldiers?

Lead & Plastic Toy Soldiers

A wonderful collection of hundreds of toy soldiers arrived at Bahoukas this fall. Most of them are “Britains” lead and plastic, some are “Barclay.” Lead ones are from the 50s and 60s; plastic from the 70s.

Britains

William Britain, W. Britain or simply Britain’s, no matter what we are called our name is synonymous with toy soldiers. Since 1893 W. Britain has been producing toy soldiers and military miniatures with attention to detail, quality and authenticity. 

from WBritain.com

According to many websites, including toysoldiersco.com, toy soldier collections have been found as far back as the time of the Pharaohs – 2500BC, when they might be made by wood, clay, stone, or metal.

Toy Soldiers of lead and plastic
Toy Soldiers from the hundreds available at Bahoukas

Because lead and plastic soldiers were so widely available, many baby-boomers grew up collecting both. Their closets and shelves were filled with shoeboxes full of painted and unpainted plastic Civil War heroes, spacemen, Nazis, Cowboys, Indians and knights, plus the proudly collected (and-too-often dented) metal figures of exotic “Arabs of the Desert,” Foreign Legionnaires and Zouaves. One day, the Cowboys and Indians might attack a Moon base made of wooden blocks and oatmeal boxes which was defended by Robert E. Lee’s Virginians and Spacemen. The next, D-Day landing craft would be stuffed with American Colonials and GI’s, storming the beach defenses manned by Nazis and Knights! Favorite figures, whether lead or plastic would always be the last to fall or remain standing to triumph.

from The Toy Soldier Company

But They Weren’t Always TOYS!

Early figurines were made from wood, porcelain and silver. Initially, these were crafted for generals and monarchs to be used during war-strategy meetings.

from Warwick&Warwick

You’ve most likely seen them used in this manner in many movies!

A Wee Bit of History

The W. Britain brand name of toy and collectable soldiers is derived from a company founded by William Britain Jr., a British toy manufacturer, who in 1893 invented the process of hollow casting in lead, and revolutionized the production of toy soldiers. The company quickly became the industry leader, and was imitated by many other companies, such as Hanks Bros. and John Hill and Co. The style and scale of Britain’s figures became the industry standard for toy soldiers for many years.

The Barclay Manufacturing Company was an American metal toy company based in New Jersey that specialised in diecast toy cars and hollowcast toy soldiers. Due to their common availability at five and dime stores, collectors often refer to Barclay’s toy soldiers as “Dimestore soldiers”.

from Wikipedia
A collection of PRESIDENTS in our toy soldiers collections

Besides soldiers, these very collectible miniatures might also include cowboys and Indians, presidents, and more.

The Times Can Change Our Toys

1966 marked a turning point in the history of toy soldiers. International concerns about lead poisoning brought about new laws which banned the manufacture of toys containing lead. William Britains, the best-known producer of 54mm metal figures, ceased production of metals and focused exclusively on plastic figures. Many other companies, like Timpo, Crescent and Cherilea, were forced to do the same.

At this point, collectors began to see new modeling techniques emerging, and plastic toy soldiers were all the rage until the world began to change. In the late 1960s and ‘70s, anti-war sentiment turned the tastes of the public away from military toys like toy soldiers. The rise of the action figure, based on science fiction and fantasy movies, and the rising appeal of video games, changed the collecting interests of younger children.

from Toy Soldier Company

So, if you remember playing with toy soldiers, eagerly creating the game as your imagination allowed, maybe you want to share that joy with a youngster in your life, or still love to collect them, stop in soon at Bahoukas. They are perfectly sized to make great stocking stuffers this season. And yes, we’re here and we’re watchin’ for ya!

Collectible Lighters and Ashtrays

Whether or not you smoke, ashtrays are appealing collectibles for numerous reasons.

First, they are small, which means you can acquire hundreds of ashtrays and display them in a relatively finite amount of space.

Second, they were made out of a wide range of materials, so if you are a fan of art glass, pounded copper, or ceramics, there is bound to be an ashtray for you.

Third, ashtrays were produced during some of the most creative periods in history, which means there are ashtrays for fans of the Victorian era, Arts and Crafts, and Art Deco.

Finally, ashtrays are snapshots of their culture, so it is not uncommon to find ashtrays that were produced to advertise products and events of the day.

from Collector’s Weekly

Ashtrays

variety of collectible ashtrays
Ashtrays came in all styles – silly to beautifully designed, touristy and promotional.

To show you just how diverse ashtray collections can be, here we show you a German Spinner by Gerzt (top center), the resting Mexican (made in Japan), the promotional ashtray from PENROSE, and the horse’s ‘arse’. Yep, something for everyone!

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

Did you know that ashtrays are a design element included in the Cooper Hewitt Museum, located in the Andrew Carnegie Mansion on Fifth Avenue, NYC? We sure wish we had one of these in our collection!

Russel Wright designed ashtray

… is displayed at the Cooper Hewitt

Preserving the natural qualities of ceramics in spite of the dominance of machine-produced pottery has been a challenge for designers since the introduction of machinery to the production process in the eighteenth century.

Russel Wright addressed this design dilemma through his biomorphic earthenware. This ashtray, part of a 1949 series manufactured by Sterling China for hotels and restaurants, embodies Wright’s idea of designing machine-made ceramics that simulate their handcrafted counterparts. Flaring up and out from its low base, the ashtray has a curved, asymmetrical rim that appears as though it was pinched and folded by hand. Although entirely molded by machine, the ashtray’s profile suggests the involvement of human contact throughout its production. The organic form also makes the ashtray user-friendly and invites human contact and interactions: the undulating rim is excellent for resting cigarettes, and the groove holds a matchbook perfectly. The groove also allowed restaurant workers to stack multiple ashtrays, the base of one fitting neatly into the ashtray below.

from Cooper Hewitt

Lighters

Do you ever wonder who invented the first lighter? No, it wasn’t the Zippo Company, though they certainly improved on it! The first was invented in 1823. The Zippo didn’t come into the picture until 1932.

Johann Wolfgang Döbereiner invented the first lighter known as “Döbereiner’s Lamp.” It looked nothing like the lighters we use today and was also difficult to use and extremely dangerous.

from Quality Logo Products
Variety of tabletop novelty lighters: military shell, Zippo, and cigarette case with lighter

The above lighters can be found in our shop and include: Top left: a cigarette case with lighter, a Queen Anne style lighter, a novelty grenade, military shell, and card cube, a Zippo lighter, and a rather art deco looking styled tabletop lighter.

So if you, or someone you know, has a collection of lighters and/or ashtrays, you just might want to check our collection. We’re here. And we’re watchin’ for ya!

Collectible Currency

Japanese Military Currency WWII

During World War II in the Philippines, the occupying Japanese government issued a fiat currency in several denominations; this is known as the Japanese government-issued Philippine fiat peso. … The Second Philippine Republic under President José P. Laurel outlawed possession of guerrilla currency, and declared a monopoly on the issuance of money, so that anyone found to possess guerrilla notes could be arrested or even executed.

Some Filipinos called the fiat peso “Mickey Mouse money”. Many survivors of the war tell stories of going to the market laden with suitcases or “bayóng” (native bags made of woven coconut or buri leaf strips) overflowing with the Japanese-issued bills. According to one witness, 75 “Mickey Mouse” pesos, or about 35 U.S. dollars at that time, could buy one duck egg. In 1944, a box of matches cost more than 100 Mickey Mouse pesos.

from Wikipedia
Japanese Pesos used in the Philippines WWII military currency

US-French Military Currency WWII

US-French franc WWII currency

The “flag ticket” franc (French: Billet drapeau

was a currency issued by the United States for use in Allied-occupied France in the wake of the Battle of Normandy. With the swift take-over of sovereignty by General Charles de Gaulle, who considered the US occupation franc as “counterfeit money”, the currency rapidly faded out of use in favour of the pre-war French franc. First Series-Supplemental French Franc Currency. Second Series-Provisional French Franc Currency.

from Wikipedia

German Marks from the early 1900s

We have 3 different German Marks that have recently arrived at our shop.

1920 German Mark
1920 German Mark
1908 German Mark
1908 German Mark
1923 German Mark
1923 German Mark

Stop in to view these latest currencies in our bill and coin collections. Here’s a sampling of the rest of our collection:

Start your coin collection at Bahoukas Antique Mall in Havre de Grace
Just a sampling of our coins and currency collections.

It’s the perfect time to begin to think of that unusual, unique, special gift for that very important person on your holiday gift list. And we’re here – watchin’ for ya!

Hats and Personalities

The hat you choose to wear reveals a lot about you. Headwear is not only functional, but a fashionable accessory that characterizes you. It also tells everyone your persona by the type or brand of the hat on your head.

from The Adair Group

Wonder what the mink fur hat and the green felt above might say about the wearer! Or the straw cloche or feathered pillbox below?

Beige straw women's cloche with green band and white flower and a yellow feathered pillbox - both available at Bahoukas
Straw cloche and feathered pillbox

How Many Styles of Hats?

In doing a little research, we found this site that lists 56 Types of Hats For Men and Women! So much fun. And do you wonder how many hats we might have right here at Bahoukas Antiques? Take a peek at this photo:

millinery display at Bahoukas - something for every outfit if you like
George at Bahoukas checking out the ladies hats just in time for the Preakness!

Hat Manners!

Yes, believe it or not, there are rules to wearing hats. I’m sure, many have been lost in the last few decades…

For Men…

Men should always remove their hats, including baseball caps and casual hats, upon entering a building.Hats should not be worn when inside, with an exception to areas related to public streets, such as corridors, lobbies, and elevators in public buildings. In public buildings, an elevator is deemed a public area, so the hat may be left on the head.

Men must remove their hats during the playing of the National Anthem, during the passing of the American flag, and for funeral processions, outdoor weddings, dedications, and photographs. Removed hats are clutched with the hands in a way so that only the outside of the hats are visible.

Hat tipping is a traditional gesture of politeness, having the same source as a military salute, which originated from the raising of medieval knights’ face visors to indicate friendliness.

from The Adair Group

For Women…

Women do not need to remove their hats when indoors, as often as men, with the exception of rain hats. Dress hats rarely need removal. This rule of protocol grew out of the function of women’s hats as ensemble-specific accessories. While men may have many hats to partner with a variety of outfits, women may partner only one hat to an individual outfit. Similarly, women’s hats worn specifically for warmth are to be removed when indoors.

Women may leave hats on during the playing of The National Anthem when indoors, unless the hat is unisex, such as a baseball cap. When wearing such a cap or hat, a woman must adhere to the same guidelines as for men.

from The Adair Group

There you have it – more than you ever wanted to know about HATS! So stop by and see what we might have that would suit YOUR personality. We’re here – and we’re watchin’ for ya!

Lucite Clamshell Phone 1970s

During the 1970s phone subscribers were permitted to own decorative housings for their phones for the first time.
Teleconcepts was one of the pioneers that provided innovative decorative phones.

from WORTHPOINT.com

This unique and quite charming clamshell phone is the “Shellamar” by Teleconcepts. It has a retractable fabric cord and YES, it absolutely works. I believe the color would be ‘caramel.’

Did you know deregulation brought us these phone designs?

The Deregulated Phone
The 1977 breakup of AT&T revolutionized telephone design, which had been, as Michael Sorkin noted, “sheltered from the vagaries of taste and the manipulations of the marketplace.” The phone was no longer a standardized, leased portal into AT&T’s network; it became an object unto itself, with results that verged on a kind of giddy kitsch, as if people were overcompensating for the long gray-flannel winter. “Today Alexander Graham Bell’s invention comes in a menagerie of forms,” the New York Times wrote in 1986, “that include Coca-Cola bottles, toucans, peekaboo Lucite globes and, in the case of the desk-top Versailles phone, with a reproduction Renoir discreetly planted in the number card.” 

from SLATE
A variety of decorative phones that include Cabbage Patch Doll image, turkey, airplane, and Fashion Shoe.
Cabbage Patch phone, Turkey phone, Airplane phone The Farmer’s Novelty Phones/gifarmer.com; Shoe phone dldt via ebay. from SLATE.com

What fun it is to consider the changing look and feel of telephones and the continuing changes from big, boxy, cell phones to our modern-day ‘smart’ phone where the telephone function is a small part of the instrument!

scene from the movie Wall Street with Gordon Gekko talking on his Motorola DynaTAC phone!
from MASIP

In 1973, the company came up with a prototype of the world’s first portable cellular telephone, using the DynaTAC (Dynamic Adaptive Total Area Coverage) system. In the year 1983, the world’s first commercial hand-held cellular phone, the Motorola DynaTAC 8000X phone, got FCC’s approval.

Weighing in at 28-ounce (794-gram), it went on sale the following year. The device used to take 10 hours to fully charge, and offered around 30 minutes of talk-time. Capable of saving last 30 dialed numbers, it carried a price tag of $3,995.

from GSMArena

The Motorola DynaTAC (1983)

The phone had long appeared in advertisements in the hands of executives as they sat in their cocoons of power, surveying their empire below, but a new kind of power was typified in the 1987 film Wall Street, in which Michael Douglas’ Gordon Gekko clutches a Motorola DynaTAC 8000X. “Oh, jeez, I wish you could see this,” he tells Bud Fox, as he walks a Hamptons beach, “the lights coming up over the water.” It’s like an advertisement for dominion over place: You can’t be here, but I can, and I’m going to use this wonderful instrument to remind you of that fact. A descendent of Motorola’s walkie-talkie work for the military (and looking like it), the DynaTAC, designed by Rudy Krolopp, came on the market in 1984, at just below $4,000 and 28 ounces. 

from SLATE

The LUCITE CLAMSHELL PHONE is a beautiful collectible from 50 years ago that reminds many of us just how quickly things have changed. We look forward to showing you this great piece and any collection ‘of our many collections’ that you might want to peruse. Yes… we are watchin’ for ya!

Harper’s Pictorial History – Civil War

The latest addition to our Military and Civil War Antiques and Collectibles are about 20 issues of Harper’s Weekly Magazine from the 1860s.

Harper’s Weekly was the most widely read journal in the United States throughout the period of the Civil War. So as not to upset its wide readership in the South, Harper’s took a moderate editorial position on the issue of slavery prior to the outbreak of the war. Publications that supported abolition referred to it as “Harper’s Weakly”. The Weekly had supported the Stephen A. Douglas presidential campaign against Abraham Lincoln, but as the American Civil War broke out, it fully supported Lincoln and the Union. A July 1863 article on the escaped slave Gordon included a photograph of his back, severely scarred from whippings; this provided many readers in the North their first visual evidence of the brutality of slavery. The photograph inspired many free blacks in the North to enlist.

Some of the most important articles and illustrations of the time were Harper’s reporting on the war. Besides renderings by Homer and Nast, the magazine also published illustrations by Theodore R. Davis, Henry Mosler, and the brothers Alfred and William Waud.

from Wikipedia

Political Cartoonist: Thomas Nast

Thomas Nast, legendary for his political cartoons in Harper’s, also cemented our present image of Santa Claus.
CLICK HERE for his story. It’s a most interesting read.

Thomas Nast cemented our present-day image of Santa Claus

Remember, Sunday is Father’s Day – June 20, 2021

From antiques and collectibles, games and videos, to our amazing Beer MuZeum, there’s sure to be the perfect gift waiting for you to discover! We’re here … and we’ll be watchin’ for ya!