Lucite Clamshell Phone 1970s

During the 1970s phone subscribers were permitted to own decorative housings for their phones for the first time.
Teleconcepts was one of the pioneers that provided innovative decorative phones.

from WORTHPOINT.com

This unique and quite charming clamshell phone is the “Shellamar” by Teleconcepts. It has a retractable fabric cord and YES, it absolutely works. I believe the color would be ‘caramel.’

Did you know deregulation brought us these phone designs?

The Deregulated Phone
The 1977 breakup of AT&T revolutionized telephone design, which had been, as Michael Sorkin noted, “sheltered from the vagaries of taste and the manipulations of the marketplace.” The phone was no longer a standardized, leased portal into AT&T’s network; it became an object unto itself, with results that verged on a kind of giddy kitsch, as if people were overcompensating for the long gray-flannel winter. “Today Alexander Graham Bell’s invention comes in a menagerie of forms,” the New York Times wrote in 1986, “that include Coca-Cola bottles, toucans, peekaboo Lucite globes and, in the case of the desk-top Versailles phone, with a reproduction Renoir discreetly planted in the number card.” 

from SLATE
A variety of decorative phones that include Cabbage Patch Doll image, turkey, airplane, and Fashion Shoe.
Cabbage Patch phone, Turkey phone, Airplane phone The Farmer’s Novelty Phones/gifarmer.com; Shoe phone dldt via ebay. from SLATE.com

What fun it is to consider the changing look and feel of telephones and the continuing changes from big, boxy, cell phones to our modern-day ‘smart’ phone where the telephone function is a small part of the instrument!

scene from the movie Wall Street with Gordon Gekko talking on his Motorola DynaTAC phone!
from MASIP

In 1973, the company came up with a prototype of the world’s first portable cellular telephone, using the DynaTAC (Dynamic Adaptive Total Area Coverage) system. In the year 1983, the world’s first commercial hand-held cellular phone, the Motorola DynaTAC 8000X phone, got FCC’s approval.

Weighing in at 28-ounce (794-gram), it went on sale the following year. The device used to take 10 hours to fully charge, and offered around 30 minutes of talk-time. Capable of saving last 30 dialed numbers, it carried a price tag of $3,995.

from GSMArena

The Motorola DynaTAC (1983)

The phone had long appeared in advertisements in the hands of executives as they sat in their cocoons of power, surveying their empire below, but a new kind of power was typified in the 1987 film Wall Street, in which Michael Douglas’ Gordon Gekko clutches a Motorola DynaTAC 8000X. “Oh, jeez, I wish you could see this,” he tells Bud Fox, as he walks a Hamptons beach, “the lights coming up over the water.” It’s like an advertisement for dominion over place: You can’t be here, but I can, and I’m going to use this wonderful instrument to remind you of that fact. A descendent of Motorola’s walkie-talkie work for the military (and looking like it), the DynaTAC, designed by Rudy Krolopp, came on the market in 1984, at just below $4,000 and 28 ounces. 

from SLATE

The LUCITE CLAMSHELL PHONE is a beautiful collectible from 50 years ago that reminds many of us just how quickly things have changed. We look forward to showing you this great piece and any collection ‘of our many collections’ that you might want to peruse. Yes… we are watchin’ for ya!

German Cobalt Blue Wine Dispenser

We’ve not been able to find a lot about this piece – a German stoneware wine cask/dispenser in Cobalt blue and white. We did find a similar piece on an auction site. CLICK HERE to view it.

Words from Martin Luther on the end of the Cobalt blue and white German wine cask/dispenser.

Thanks to Edel Patterson, owner of Edel’s Bridal Shop here in Havre de Grace, we are able to give you the translation on this beautiful wine dispenser/cask.

Iss, was gar ist.
Trink, was klar ist.
Sprich, was wahr ist.
Lieb, was rar ist.

In English, it translates as follows and is from Martin Luther:

Eat what is done.
Drink what is clear.
Speak what is true.
Love what is rare.

More detail of the gnomes and design on this German cobalt blue and white stoneware wine cask/dispnser

This piece recently arrived at Bahoukas and it’s truly exquisite!

While we’re discussing wine casks/dispensers, have you ever wondered who might have the World’s Largest Wine Barrel?

World’s Largest Wine Barrel

Well, wonder no more… within the cellars of the Heidelberg Castle in German, is the Heidelberg Tun:

The Heidelberg Tun (German: Großes Fass), or Great Heidelberg Tun, is an extremely large wine vat contained within the cellars of Heidelberg Castle. There have been four such barrels in the history of Heidelberg. In 1751, the year of its construction, the present one had a capacity of 221,726 litres (58,574 U.S. gallons). Due to the drying of the wood its current capacity is 219,000 litres (57,854 U.S. gallons). One hundred and thirty oak trees were reputedly used in its construction. It has only rarely been used as a wine barrel, and in fact presently enjoys more use as a tourist attraction, and also as a dance floor since one was constructed on top of the tun.

from Wikipedia

Heidelberg Tun

Located in the cellars of the Heidelberg Castle is this mammoth wine barrel. Check out the size of the people around it and the stairway to the right that takes you up to the top landing. WOW!

Now that we’ve piqued your interest. Stop in and see the beautiful stoneware wine cask. And, of course, we’re watchin’ for ya!

Vintage Photos & Tintypes

Why Collect Old Photos?

If you’ve browsed an antique shop, you’ve most likely noticed the old photos in boxes, stacked in corners. You’ve also most likely been drawn to one or two, wondering where the place is or who are those people. You may have even commented on their attire or the sternness in their expression. The article connected to the following quote is a very easy and interesting read.

The People Who Collect Strangers’ Memories

In gathering old photographs of daily life, family scenes, and illness, hobbyists get an intimate view into past lives.

from The ATlantic
photo that looks like an old school building c. 1906
c. 1906 – looks like an old school building

There are many reasons old photographs are collected. Some folks are looking for certain locations while others may be collecting a category, say, a particular advertising, old motorcycles, vintage farm photos, portraits. You name it, someone’s collecting it.

But we’re most assuredly pulled into wondering about the story behind the photo.

photo of a Farrell Auto Co. advertising BUICK
Farrell Auto Co. photo advertising BUICK
vintage photos of people
Vintage photos – don’t you wonder about who they are?

What To Do With The Found Vintage Photos You Love

Feeling crafty? This article gives some great ways to incorporate those vintage photos into your decor. CLICK HERE for the article from salvagedliving.com

TINTYPES

Tintypes

We also have a few tintypes in our store. Do you know what “tintypes” are?

tintype, also known as a melainotype or ferrotype, is a photograph made by creating a direct positive on a thin sheet of metal coated with a dark lacquer or enamel and used as the support for the photographic emulsion. Tintypes enjoyed their widest use during the 1860s and 1870s, but lesser use of the medium persisted into the early 20th century and it has been revived as a novelty and fine art form in the 21st.

from wikipedia

It might also be of interest to you to learn why tintypes are so special.

Tintypes are a very early type of antique photograph dating back to the late 19th century. 

… There is no negative in the tintype process, making each one a rare, one-of-a-kind photograph. Tintypes are valuable capsules of history and should only be directly worked on by an archival specialist. Today virtually all tintype images needing restoration are restored digitally on the computer.

from Our EveryDay Life

CLICK HERE for an intriguing article that explains much more about the markings on a tintype and also how to get some clues from the photo. It’s a really interesting piece.

So there you have it. We have vintage photos and a few tintypes. Stop in and see if something catches your fancy or adds to a particular collection you may have. In the meantime, be assured. We’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Crabs and Oysters

The blue crab is a highly sought-after shellfish. Blue crabs live up and down the Atlantic Coast and in the Gulf of Mexico and are caught by both commercial and recreational fishermen. Its scientific name—Callinectes sapidus—translated from Latin means ‘beautiful savory swimmer.’

Blue crabs are the most valuable fishery in the Chesapeake Bay. They are also major predators of benthic communities and are prey for many other fish species. Blue crabs are so treasured in the region that the blue crab is the Maryland state crustacean.

from Fisheries.noaa.gov
beautiful blue crab of the Chesapeake
beautiful blue crab

New to Eating Crabs?

Let us help you out!

Do you know what BABY OYSTERS are called?

SPAT! That’s right. Here’s a fun article: 10 Things You Didn’t Know About Chesapeake Oysters.

Have you ever wondered if eating oysters is really healthy? Check out this article:

“Yes, oysters are very good for you,” according to preventive cardiology dietitian Julia Zumpano, RD, LD. 

“In fact, you probably didn’t know that it’s hard to beat all the health benefits of oysters from a nutritional standpoint,” she says.

from ClevelandClinic.org
Oysters from the Chesapeake - YUM
Image by StockSnap from Pixabay

New to Oysters? Watch this:

Along with a few crab mallets, we also have these beautiful oyster knives.

wooden handled oyster knives at Bahoukas
Oyster Knives

Finally – Maryland Skipjacks

Skipjacks in the Chesapeake and oyster drudgin’ are as much a part of Maryland culture as duck hunting and decoys. We couldn’t talk about crabs and oysters without a bit about skipjacks. And don’t forget to visit the Havre de Grace Decoy Museum and Havre de Grace Maritime Museum for local history.

SKIPJACKS

The Maryland State Boat has a colorful history. And you might find some items in our shop at Bahoukas to add to your Maryland collection.

The skipjack became the State Boat in 1985 (Chapter 788, Acts of 1985; Code General Provisions Article, sec. 7-327).At that time, the General Assembly noted that: “. . . Recent efforts to restore the environmental integrity of the Chesapeake Bay have rekindled interest and appreciation in the majestic estuary as not only an economic asset but also as the foundation for a way of life for many Marylanders; and . . . Nothing better represents the way of life of Maryland watermen than the historic Chesapeake Boat known as the Skipjack . . .”

Skipjack under sail on Chesapeake Bay. Photo by Marion E. Warren (Marion E. Warren Collection, MSA SC1890-BP7506, Maryland State Archives).

from MSA.Maryland.gov

We encourage you to stop in and see these items. We may have some oyster plates as well. And check out our book selections, you just might find a cookbook with ideal recipes for crabs, oysters, or perfect side dishes. Yep, we’ll be here and waitin’ for ya!

Helixophile? You?

Corkscrews have a long history.

Its design may have derived from the gun worm which was a device used by men to remove unspent charges from a musket’s barrel in a similar fashion, from at least the early 1630s

The corkscrew is possibly an English invention, due to the tradition of beer and cider, and Treatise on Cider by John Worlidge in 1676 describes “binning of tightly corked cider bottles on their sides”, although the earliest reference to a corkscrew is, “steel worm used for the drawing of Corks out of Bottles” from 1681.

In 1795, the first corkscrew patent was granted to the Reverend Samuel Henshall, in England. The clergyman affixed a simple disk, now known as the Henshall Button, between the worm and the shank. The disk prevents the worm from going too deep into the cork, forces the cork to turn with the turning of the crosspiece, and thus breaks the adhesion between the cork and the neck of the bottle. The disk is designed and manufactured slightly concave on the underside, which compresses the top of the cork and helps keep it from breaking apart.

from Wikipedia
intricately designed handle on a corkscrew

INTRICATE

This beautiful handle on this corkscrew
is beautifully crafted.

CARICATURES

Quite often corkscrews were created with various characters, symbols, or logos.

We don’t think this one is from Havre de Grace, even though the BOWMAN name is familiar here!

Just like all other items, a corkscrew was often great advertising. This one from Bowman Hotels is easily carried to be used anywhere. Picnic anyone?

Think you might be a helixophile

… or want to be? CLICK HERE for a fun article on this very collectible single-purpose tool from NOLA.com.

Might you be wondering about the most expensive corkscrew sold?

Wonder no more:

A heritage corkscrew. When the old London Bridge was demolished in the 1831, its surviving fragment was turned into a corkscrew, which was sold at an auction in Essex, UK for £40,000 (around $62,790), about 100 times its guide price.

from LUXURYLAUNCHES.com

So there you go … more than you ever wanted to know about the familiar corkscrew. But it just might put you on the path to being a helixophile. We’re here to guide you. And you bet, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Are you into crafts?

Upcycled Printer’s Drawer and more…

A letterpress drawer is a thin wooden tray with compartments. These drawers were part of a larger printing cabinet that were common between the 15th and 19th centuries. The small sections store letter stamps or “sorts” that were used in a printing press for relief printing. Letterpress drawers are also referred to as type cases, type drawers, printer block drawers, and printer’s trays. 

from TheSpruce.com
Printer’s Type – numbers
Printer’s Type – designs

Printer’s drawers make a great display for small collections, sewing needs, even succulent and air plants.
(See 11 Ways to Repurpose Letterpress Drawers)

using a printer's drawer for succulents and air plants from TheSpruce.com

Fun using metal type

Old metal type can easily be used to add a bit of pizzazz to a craft. You can ink it with a stamp pad and using it to make your own gift wrap, to decorate a lunch or gift bag, to create a card, or to just give the kids a little knowledge about using type.

Visit us and we’ll show you what we have in our printer collection. Yep, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Jewel Tea Co. and Hall Dishware

In 2020, thanks to a covid pandemic, delivery to our door has become commonplace for just about everyone! But if you’re familiar with Jewel Tea Co., you may not realize they started their door-to-door business in 1899.

Although many remember the Jewel Tea Co. which closed in 1981, few are probably aware of just how unique and entrepreneurial this company was. The following quote is a great example of how nimble and quick-thinking they were:

There were many tea companies at that time, and they all sold door-to-door, giving premium coupons with grocery purchases. When enough coupons had been saved, the customer had a choice of premium items offered. One day Mr. Ross knocked on the kitchen door of a prospective customer and had hardly stated his business when she grabbed a broom. He returned later that same day and learned that the lady had saved coupons for six months buying coffee and tea from a “wagon man” and had expected to get a rug with her coupons. However, the wagon man stopped coming around. Mr. Ross quickly offered her a premium to be left with her first order, to be paid out with a later trade.

This story varies from a broom to hot water, but the fast-thinking Mr. Ross with his idea of advancing the premium set the Jewel Tea Company apart from all other existing tea companies of the day.

from chicagology.com
A set of Autumn Leaves pattern dishware used as premiums for the Jewel Tea Co. at Bahoukas in Havre de Grace.
Jewel Tea Co. “Autumn Leaves” dishware by Hall Co.

Many of the baby boomers today will recall these dishes from having had them in their homes growing up. They were premiums offered by Jewel Tea Co. and made by Hall China Company.

In the mid-1920s, the directors of Hall China made a decision to associate with the Jewel Tea Company to produce an exclusive line of dinnerware for them. Jewel started using Hall teapots as premiums, and then expanded the promotion to include its own line of distinctive dinnerware and kitchenware. New pieces were introduced by Hall China for Jewel until 1980.

from Wikipedia

Cameo Rose Pattern

Autumn Leaves and Cameo Rose dishware patterns made by Hall China Co. for the Jewel Tea Co.

This image is from a tching.com post and shows both the Autumn Leaves and Cameo Rose designs.

Do you collect the Cameo Rose pattern?

There’s much to be learned from earlier successful companies. And it’s always fun to start a collection where you can share a bit of the ‘story’ that comes with them.

Drop by and chat with us, browse our 9,000 sq. ft. of collections. We’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Recycle-Repurpose-Kitchen Utensils

Are you serious about reusing items to keep them out of landfills? Many items in antique stores, besides adding to a collection or being a wonderful decorating item, are also quite useful.

Kitchen Utensils to Repurpose!

Look at this photo of one wall of kitchen items that could easily enjoy another few years of purpose.

Just one wall of great kitchen utensils that could be used today!
Rolling pins from days of yore available at Bahoukas

We also have

… rolling pins, cake dishes, pie tins, and cast iron pans to name just a few easily repurposed.

So many great ideas…

Cast iron pans

It’s well worth a visit to Bahoukas Antique Mall to see if we might have ‘just the item you need.’ If you need a link for other ideas, CLICK HERE. You’ll find dozens of items you probably never would think to look for at Bahoukas. Of course, we’re always watchin’ for ya!

Is PINK still popular?

IF IT’S PINK DEPRESSION GLASS – YES!

We absolutely love this collection. If, per chance, you don’t remember what Depression Glass is, here’s a bit of background:

Glassmakers couldn’t sustain through the Great Depression by providing the popular labor-intensive cut crystal glass of the 1920s to the upper class. Much like we’ve seen distilleries pivot to hand sanitizer and designers pivot to mask production during the COVID-19 pandemic, glass companies that once made luxury crystal were forced to reconsider their products. In an attempt to keep people employed, glass factories in the Ohio River Valley pivoted to mass-producing significantly cheaper molded, patterned glassware thanks to an innovative machine that could produce upwards of 1,000 pieces a day.

from Architectural Digest

We’ve just received this amazing collection of Pink Depression Glass – serving dishes to candy bowls.

This Pink Depression Glass Collection is exquisite!

Did you know there is a National Depression Glass Association?

Lovely Pink Depression Glass bowls and parfait dishes, goblets and pitchers.

What’s really exciting is that, according to this Architectural Digest article, the interest in collecting Pink Depression Glass (and others) could be gaining new interest.

This is just one “Collection of our many Collections! Stop in soon and browse Bahoukas Antique Mall and Beer MuZeum. Yes, we’re watchin’ for ya!

Collectible Invalid Feeders

Does you Dad collect military items?

Or maybe you just like to have unique items, we call ‘conversation pieces,’ on your table or shelf. The Red Cross invalid feeder is from WWI.

… an “invalid feeder” which was often found in many homes late in the 19th into the 20th century. They were used to facilitate the feeding of invalids. A liquid or semi-soft food was placed in the feeder and the spout was then placed in the person’s mouth. In the movie “The English Patient” the use of a feeder was shown in a brief flashback.

from AAHN website

Also known as Pap Boats, Invalid Feeders were used throughout the 19th century and well into the 20th century to aid in the feeding of patients that were too weak to feed themselves and in feeding infants. The use of invalid and infant feeders was much more popular in Europe than in the United States. A mixture called Pap, consisting of flour, bread, and water was mixed together to creat a gruel that was fed to the patient. Typically, the feeders were made of ceramic and colorfully decorated, with some shaped like animals for feeding children. Some early Invalid Feeders were made out of sterling silver or clear glass.

from Edward Hand Medical Museum

Next time you’re watching a movie from Victorian Era through WWI, keep an eye out for a nurse using an invalid feeder. It adds a little fun to your movie night.

Bahoukas received a beautiful collection of invalid feeders. Some are very plain, others are quite exquisite. One or two of them look like they were especially made for children.

Stop in and take a peek. Yep, we’ll be watching for ya!

Pickle? Ferment? Or just decorate?

Stoneware Crocks have many uses…

Stoneware Crocks and Jugs available at Bahoukas

The word “pickle” comes from a Dutch word ‘pekel’ or northern German ‘pókel’ meaning “salt” or “brine,” two components that are essential in the pickling process. Pickling in America is largely synonymous with the act of submerging cucumbers (or other fruits or vegetables) into a salty brine or acidic solution along with various spices to create an environment where no unhealthy bacteria can survive and your vegetable is preserved.

from Almanac.com

Stoneware crocks were used for pickling and fermenting foods for centuries! The process also gives you an easy and effortless way to make probiotic-rich fermented foods a part of your life. And if you remember pickles or sauerkraut from your grandmother’s pantry, you probably remember the flavor being much more complex and tasty than those you buy in a jar today.

Historically, the process of pickling was a necessity and an invaluable way to preserve foods for sailors and travelers. It provided families with food through the colder months.

from Almanac.com

If you’re interested in an easy-to-read introduction to pickling/fermenting, CLICK HERE for a great blog post and answers to the many questions you might have. And one more site that may be of interest in choosing and caring for a crock, CLICK HERE.

More stoneware crocks and jugs available at Bahoukas Antique Mall

But maybe you just love, love, love these old crocks and jugs. Visit this page for photos of great ways to decorate with crock pots – 36 ways, in fact.

Maybe you’ve found a container that you’d like to make it ‘look’ like an old crock. Here’s a great do-it-yourself solution.

CLICK HERE

Here are the before and after photos…

So, as you can see, we have the crocks and jugs. You can decide which ones you like and how you might use them. Stop in soon and choose your favorites. Yep, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Did you notice our windows?

Love the look of days gone by…

Doesn’t this window just make you feel warm and cozy?

What an inviting window display to encourage you to step inside Bahoukas Antique Mall and Beer MuZeum! Although we’ve just had an amazingly warm January weekend, we know it won’t last. Stop in and see what we might have to keep you busy on a colder January day!

A wonderful collection of spiced tins, vegetable cans, scales, iron, pottery,
blackboard, and more all waiting for you to visit Bahoukas!

The entire window reminds you of the cozy warmth of days of yore. Here we see a variety of spice tins and vegetable cans, scales, irons, old shoes, pottery, a blackboard and so much more.

Stop by and take a look. See how inviting it is. Then pop in and tell Norma you love her window designs! And, of course, everyone at Bahoukas is watchin’ for ya!

Cast Iron Pots

assortment of cast iron pans at Bahoukas in Havre de Grace
A selection of cast iron skillets and more at Bahoukas

The History of Cast Iron Cookware

The first known use of cast iron cookware was during the Han Dynasty in China, around 220 A.D. Casting techniques became widespread in Europe by the 16th century, and since then, this versatile equipment has been a staple in households all over the world. In 1707, Abraham Darby patented the sand casting method, which is similar to the way we make cast iron today. Because of Darby’s contribution, the 18th and 19th centuries saw a boom in cast iron cookware. Cast iron pots and pans were so important to daily life that in his book, The Wealth of Nations, Adam Smith says they were worth more than gold. Cast iron cookware saw a decline in the 20th century as other cooking materials like aluminum grew in popularity.

from WebRestaurantStore.com

Many pieces that seem too difficult to clean-up may be handled with several soakings in vinegar. That and other suggestions are in the following video.

A very informative video re cast iron pans

We have several cast iron cooking/baking pieces that will be great in your home, at the hunting lodge, or to use on your campfire!

Cast iron cookware has been around forever, and it isn’t going anywhere anytime soon. If you want to get in on this trend, follow these tips and you’ll be whipping up pan-seared steaks and skillet cornbread in no time.

from WebRestaurantStore.com
Cast Iron Muffin/Biscuits and more

Stop into Bahoukas Antique Mall today and see if we have a cast iron piece that just might be what you’ve been looking for.

And yes, you know we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

2 Handled Bowls?

Soup? Tea? Here’s the ‘scoop.’

Vintage Double-Handled Soup Bowls

Did you know there was a time when picking up your soup bowl and sipping was proper? That’s right!

If it looks like a teacup with two handles and it fits nicely into a matching saucer, then this item is a soup bowl. It was once considered polite to gently sip one’s soup. Quietly using a spoon came later and now soups are considered one of the “naturally” messier foods out there.

from: DustyOldThing.com

As winter temps settle in, we all look forward to savoring a wonderful warm bowl of soup. What’s more wonderful than enjoying that soup from a bowl designed to pick up and sip!

Beautiful Vintage Double-Handled Soup Bowls

Stop into Bahoukas Antique Mall soon and choose a couple for your home! MMMMmmmmmmmm… I can spell that soup now! Yep, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Planning a Winter Getaway?

Maybe to warmer climes?

Beautiful and colorful assortment of train cases available at Bahoukas in Havre de Grace.
We have a large collection of beautiful train cases at Bahoukas.

It may start with the perfect train case. Of course, it works fine on a ship, a bus, a plane, or in your car.

And there’s a style to fit every personality!

These lovely train cases are also perfect for crafts, hobbies, or even projects and lunches you may carry on your long commute to work each day.

Perhaps you’re headed to a ski resort?

Sturdy suitcases and many will match the train cases!

Wherever you may be headed, we have some great luggage pieces to make your trip easier. Stop in and make your choice! Stylish – Sturdy – Practical!

And yes, you know we’re always watchin’ for ya!

Lamps Galore!

Look up! You’ll find a wonderful variety of lamps!

With a store that overflows with hidden treasures, we have to encourage you to look UP to see a variety of lamps and lanterns available to light up your home or office.

We look forward to helping you find a few very special gifts for your holiday list. Stop in and let us help. We’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Beautiful Serving Dishes

Just in time for the Holidays!

Gravy boat and small tureen in blue and white add wonderful accents to your holiday dining. Available at Bahoukas in Havre de Grace
Gravy Boat and Small Tureen

Looking for a beautiful piece to add a bit of class to your holiday table?

We have a wonderful selection of serving pieces. Oh, you say they don’t match what you have? Well, put on your creative decorating hat and use them as ‘accent pieces’ rather than ‘matching pieces.’

Beautiful blue and white platter, pitcher, and square covered serving dish at Bahoukas.
Platters and Tureen

Upcycling is not only practical but can truly be beautiful.

When you find a perfect serving piece to accent your table and to show off that favorite side dish, you’ll have the perfect match!

Glass chip and dip set (or a beautiful salad dish) has just a hint of holiday red!
Chips and Dip? Or maybe a beautiful salad bowl!

This lovely glass serving dish will add a bit of color to your buffet table and has just a touch of holiday hue!

beautiful covered butter dishes and a small flowered tureen at Bahoukas in Havre de Grace
Butter Dishes and Small Tureen

Beautiful covered butter dishes are so much nicer than a plastic tub.

From simple lines to beautiful cut glass, we have a wonderful selection. Did you notice the beautiful small tureen? It’s a gorgeous piece for serving that yummy side dish.

These are just a few of the beautiful pieces we have that will add a touch of color, class, and even conversation to your holiday meals. Stop in soon and pick out one or two for YOUR decorating.

In the meantime, you can be sure that we’ll be here and we’re watchin’ for ya!

Taking Cake To Dinner?

Bahoukas offers some help!

Cake carrier and serving dishes at Bahoukas Antique Mall
Cake Carriers and Serving Dishes

As you head into the holidays, plans are being made for “what should we take with us to dinner!” Here at Bahoukas, we can offer a bit of help by sharing a number of collectibles to give that dish extra special attention. In this post, we’re sharing cake trays and carriers.

Cake Trays - spoon holder

Beautiful glass Cake Trays and unique ceramic spoon holder

Bahoukas has beautiful glass trays and plates for presenting your beautiful cake in all its splendor. We also have metal carriers to help you get it to the party all in one piece!

Glass Cake Trays and metal cake carriers

So whether you’re presenting in a beautiful covered glass dish in your own home or you need a carrier to take it to a dinner party, we just might have what you need.

A beautiful glass Cake Tray with Cover

Recycling and Upcycling make shopping at Bahoukas the best ‘first stop’ on your agenda. You may just find the perfect item and unique while adding a bit of color and story to your gift and/or presentation. All while saving a perfectly sound item from our landfill. Seems like a perfect match for the upcoming “THANKSGIVING HOLIDAY!”

You bet … we’ll be watchin’ for ya!