Cast Iron Pots

assortment of cast iron pans at Bahoukas in Havre de Grace
A selection of cast iron skillets and more at Bahoukas

The History of Cast Iron Cookware

The first known use of cast iron cookware was during the Han Dynasty in China, around 220 A.D. Casting techniques became widespread in Europe by the 16th century, and since then, this versatile equipment has been a staple in households all over the world. In 1707, Abraham Darby patented the sand casting method, which is similar to the way we make cast iron today. Because of Darby’s contribution, the 18th and 19th centuries saw a boom in cast iron cookware. Cast iron pots and pans were so important to daily life that in his book, The Wealth of Nations, Adam Smith says they were worth more than gold. Cast iron cookware saw a decline in the 20th century as other cooking materials like aluminum grew in popularity.

from WebRestaurantStore.com

Many pieces that seem too difficult to clean-up may be handled with several soakings in vinegar. That and other suggestions are in the following video.

A very informative video re cast iron pans

We have several cast iron cooking/baking pieces that will be great in your home, at the hunting lodge, or to use on your campfire!

Cast iron cookware has been around forever, and it isn’t going anywhere anytime soon. If you want to get in on this trend, follow these tips and you’ll be whipping up pan-seared steaks and skillet cornbread in no time.

from WebRestaurantStore.com
Cast Iron Muffin/Biscuits and more

Stop into Bahoukas Antique Mall today and see if we have a cast iron piece that just might be what you’ve been looking for.

And yes, you know we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

What do cigars, shoes, and sausage have in common?

Great Vintage Tools

Cobbler’s Cast Iron Shoe Repair Stands

This set of cobbler’s shoe repair stands would make a very interesting display in the right setting.

Sausage Press/Juice Press

This press has been painted, but it’s really beautiful!

This press isn’t exactly the one we have, but you get the idea.
It’s also been powder-coated for durability and looks amazing!

A unique cigar press

A small cast iron cigar press.

How’s it Done?
Creating cigars, as you may know, is a process that takes months and even years. After our sweet tobacco leaves are primed from the fields, they are sorted, cured, fermented, sorted again, and bunched. It is here that we differ from the regular cigar and get into box-press. Once ‘bunched’, the filler is rolled in its binder; a standard cigar will be pressed into shape in a mold and this will be its final shape. The molds are stacked sometimes 25 high for an allotted time. The stacking allows for pressure to be distributed evenly. From here the cigar is trimmed and paired with its wrapper. Where box-pressing differs is the compression methods used to make the iconic square shape. Box-pressing is only ever done on a stronger leaf; a broadleaf wrapper is far too delicate to withstand the pressing process.

Standard Box-Pressing
This method is very similar to pressing your regular cigar. Once the screaming newborn stogie has its wrapper, it’s snugly placed in its box, while multiple boxes are stacked and placed on a manually controlled press with just enough pressure to form a tight seal and avoid breakage.

from Famous-Smoke.com
How and why to box press a cigar

So as you see, here at Bahoukas Antique Mall, you just never know what you’ll find. Stop by soon and see these unique vintage tools for yourself. Great collectibles, unique items, and definitely conversation starters! Yep, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Yes, we have ‘critters’

Well, we’re not the Farm Fair but …

This little piggy … is CAST IRON

We have some wonderful critters to decorate your home or even your office! This piggy bank is cast iron and probably at least a foot long. What a great way to keep that door open and let the cool breeze in while having a great place to put all that loose change!

Mary had a little lamb… and so did Bahoukas!
Lifesize kitty cat … don’t you just love it!

The lamb, geese, and cat are ceramic. But oh, so cute! Surely there’s a special little space that one or two would work perfectly!

The dog is cast iron. We have a wide variety of cast iron pieces for shelf or floor, as well as some doorstoppers.

The cast iron heron is perfecting for our area. But, then again, anyone who loves herons will find the perfect spot for it. Have a water view from your home? This would be a wonderful addition to your decor. Wish you had a water view? This wonderful statue could help remind you of the joy you feel when you’re near the water.

Just a sampling of the fun items you’ll find at Bahoukas Antique Mall & Beer MuZeum in Havre de Grace, MD. Stop in and discover a perfect collectible from the ‘Collector of Collections.’ Yep, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Cast Iron Door Knockers

and their interesting history

… the history of door knockers begins several thousand years ago in Ancient Greece.

Greeks were a bit picky about unannounced visits to their dwellings, and it was considered a breach of etiquette to enter without warning.


Where Spartans would simply shout their arrival, the more sophisticated Athenians preferred to use a door knocker.

from Five Minute History

Doors had replaced hangings to provide better safety and privacy, and upper-class Greeks had slaves whose sole purpose was to answer the door.


It’s a bit like having a butler, but one that was chained to the door to prevent them wandering off. If they didn’t die of boredom, they’d fall asleep, and so to wake them up, visitors rapped the door with a short bar of iron attached to a chain.


from Five Minute History

It wasn’t long before some Greeks realized the short bar made a good weapon with which to attack the householder. So property owners fought back with new technology.


The knocker evolved into a heavy ring fastened to the door by a plate—dual purpose knocker and handle!


from Five Minute History


One of the most enduring themes for knockers has been the lion’s head.
Traditionally regarded as the king of beasts, the lion’s head symbolizes bravery, nobility, strength, and valor.


Lion’s head knockers were popular in the American colonies up until the revolution when the Eagle took precedence.


from Five Minute History

So we encourage you to visit Bahoukas and take a peek at these wonderful cast iron door knockers.

They’re really fun and will most certainly have your guests stop and enjoy! Yep, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Kisses, Cherry Pits, and Video Games

Just what might these have in common?

Kissing figurines, cherry pitter, and video games - make for some fun treasures at Bahoukas Antiques

Well, they may not have much in common. But they are a great example of the variety of treasures you might find at Bahoukas Antique Mall. According to holidayinsights.com, International Kissing Day is today, July 6th. Kisses can be anything from a peck on the check to those long, toe-tingling lovers’ smooches. If you just want to celebrate with a little gift, check out these cute little oriental figurines ‘smooching.’ Don’t they just make you smile? Oh, come on, just a little bit!

Tomorrow, July 7, is Cherry Pit Spitting Day. Who knew! Here’s the history from: Holiday Insights

Date When Celebrated : First Saturday of July

In 1974, Herb Teichman of Eau Claire, MI.held a cherry pit spitting tournament as a joke, at a picnic. It was a real hit, and has been held annually since that very first tournament in 1974. Little did Teichman know at the time, that this would become an annual event, and spark the creation of International Cherry Pit Spitting Day .

The timing for this holiday on the first Saturday in July is perfect, as the cherries are ripe. As we hold Fourth of July and summer picnics, fresh cherries are available in abundance.

Are you looking to break the record? Well, you’d better start practicing. The world record  for cherry pit spitting is 100′ 4″ !!

Celebrate this special day by holding or participating in a cherry pit spitting contest.

About the date: Herb Teichman, the originator to the Cherry Pit Spitting contest, set the first Saturday in July for this annual event. There are some references to this day always being on July 7th. This is erroneous. It is not a fixed date.

This amazing cast iron cherry ‘pitter’ is waiting for the champion ‘spitter’ to use to create his/her arsenal. (Now isn’t that a tongue-twister!) Have fun!

Then on Sunday, July 8, we have Video Games Day! 

Video Games Day – always on July 8th

National Video Games Day – always on September 12th

Video Games Day celebrates popular video games that stormed onto the market, and changed the way your kids play games. From Atari to Nintendo to Xbox, video games provide all too many hours of playing time on your television set.

In grandma and grandpa’s day, they had stick horses for toys and playtime. Todays kids (big kids and little kids) have an enormous array of video games to play. Before you get tired of one game, another one hits the market.

Our extensive research into this special day discovered two separately distinct dates. Also, both dates for this special day refer to it as Video Games Day and National Video Games Day. Based upon our research results, we give the edge to September 12th as National Video Games Day. Lucky gamer that you are, you get to celebrate two video games days.

Celebrate  National Video Games Day by playing video games. If you are off from school (or if you are a big kid off from work), make this a marathon day for video games. Better still, invite a few friends and hold a competition. Just make certain that you have enough controllers.    … Holiday Insights

And yes, for today’s celebration, Bahoukas has a variety of those pre-historic…. errr… historic video games you know and loved in decades past. Stop by and browse.

Don’t forget it’s also our “CHRISTMAS in JULY” sale with 20% off EVERYthing in the store. So stop in soon… browse for your treasures. Yep, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

When Pigs Fly?

You’ve heard that, right? It’s called an adynation!

The phrase “when pigs fly” (alternatively, “pigs might fly”) is an adynaton—a figure of speech so hyperbolic that it describes an impossibility. The implication of such a phrase is that the circumstances in question (the adynaton, and the circumstances to which the adynaton is being applied) will never occur.  from Wikipedia

cast iron flying pig at Bahoukas in Havre de Grace

We have a fairly large variety of vintage and reproduction cast iron pieces, including our “FLYING PIG!”

Use these hefty fellows as a doorstop, by your fireplace, or just a fun decoration and conversation piece. Here are a couple more pics:

reproduction cast iron figures at Bahoukas Antique Mall

Along with these great reproduction cast iron pieces, you’ll find a number of vintage and collectible cast iron items.

Reproduction cast iron pig at Havre de Grace Bahoukas

It couldn’t be any more fun than this! So drop by Bahoukas Antique Mall and choose your favorite from our vintage and reproduction collections of cast iron figures. Yessiree, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

We Predict a Halloween Party in Your Near Future!

Bahoukas loves a party. Halloween is a perfect reason!

With a busy week of Homecoming, a Carnival, Halloween activities and sun-filled October days, you’re bound to be attending or hosting your own Halloween party. Here are some items to create a memorable event. Below are cast iron characters – a ghost and a nodder (bobble head) witch. Add these to your centerpiece to make your table or buffet really special.

Cast Iron Halloween collectibles - ghost on leftl, witch ghost on right

In the following photo, we show you just a few of the many wonderful vintage Halloween collectibles available at Bahoukas Antique Mall. A plastic puppet, small pumpkin etc for favors, a larger pumpkin to hold a candle, a tambourine with Halloween decoration, favors, and cupcake decorations, etc. Stop in and see the variety of really fun Halloween collectibles. Hurry, you’ll want them for your party this week!

Halloween party items - witch puppet (plastic), pumpkin, favors, small pumpkin for candle, tamborine, and various small items for cake decorating, etc.

With Halloween retail sales projected to be 9.1 billion (yes that’s Billion – with a ‘B’), we know you’ll want to check out some really great pieces to add a wee bit of nostalgia to your decorations. And don’t forget, we have a lot of unique items to add just the finishing touch you need for your very unique costume. See you soon. We’ll be watchin’ for you!

Do you know what a door porter is?

We Know Them As Door Stops

Those heavy, cast iron, painted door stops that you use to hold a door open. With cooler days approaching, turn off your air conditioners and open the door. Let one of these whimsical cast-iron door stops hold the door open for fresh, cool air to circulate through your home or office.

They can be whimsical or historical, but cast-iron doorstops were always functional before air conditioning and central heating. In 18th century England where they originated they were known as “door porters. They were made in America in the early 19th century. Historically, President Andrew Jackson is said to have had figural frog doorstops with the slogan “I croak for the Jackson wagon, “ used during his campaign. _from The Antique Shoppe Florida

Duck, dogs or boats cast-iron doorstops at Bahoukas Antiques in Maryland

In the above photo, the duck is a reproduction. The dogs and the ship “The Constitution” are originals.

After the Civil War when iron casting techniques became more refined doorstops became of a status symbol for the upper class and many subjects from animals to ships became popular. Whatever was trendy at the time was turned into a doorstop. During the 1850s when trading with Japan began figural doorstops were images of Buddha.  _from The Antique Shoppe Florida

Door stops first appeared in England in the late 1700s. Made of cast brass, they were used to help prop open the heavy English doors, allowing air to better circulate through homes. The earliest door stops had wooden handles so they could be easily moved. Handles disappeared in the 19th century; by then, cast iron had replaced brass. Most door stops you’ll find today were likely made in America sometime between the turn of the last century and 1940. They hit their peak of popularity during the 1920s and ’30s.   _from Yankee Magazine