Day 32 – 44 Days of Gift Giving Ideas from Bahoukas

CRACKLE GLASS Adds Sparkle to the Holidays!

GLASS is the third most popular collectible in the world, preceded only by coins and stamps. We feel CRACKLE GLASS is the most beautiful. Have you ever seen CRACKLE GLASS in a window when the sun reflects off the glass? A window decorated with different colored crackle is truly breathtaking.

 

Crackle Glass is known by other names, such as CRAQUELLE GLASS, ICE GLASS, OVERSHOT GLASS.

It was the Venetian Glass Makers of the 16th Century, who invented this marvelous process. The glass was immersed in cold water while it was molten hot, thereby cracking the glass. The glass was then reheated and either mold or hand blown into the shape the glass blower desired. The reheating of the glass sealed the cracks. If you run your hands over CRACKLE GLASS, you can feel the cracks, but the inside is smooth to touch.

Glass makers from the 19th Century and even today are still using the same methods.

 

Some of the companies that produced CRACKLE GLASS are: Blenko Glass Company, Pilgrim Glass Company, Mt. Washington Glass Company, H.C. Fry Glass Company, Boston & Sandwich Glass Company, Hobbs, Bruckunier & Company, Cambridge Glass Company, Kanawha Glass Company. Some of these companies are still operating today, making CRACKLE GLASS.

 

from The Glass Museum website

A variety of small pieces of crackle glass available at Bahoukas in Havre de Grace.

Pieces included in the above photo are Kanawha of Dunbar WV, Pilgrim Glass, in beautiful colors of amberina, green, amethyst, blue and amber. The beautiful little vases and pitchers are stunning on a window sill where they’ll beautifully reflect the the light.

Text with a bit of HIstory about Crackle Glass

Cover of book CRACKLE GLASS by Weitman

The above excerpt is taken from the book: Crackle Glass, Volume 2 by Stan and Arlene Weitman.

Well, you know the story… we have 44 Gift Giving Ideas PLUS! So stop by soon…. Christmas isn’t far off.

We’re ready to help. And yes… we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Day 31 – 44 Gift Giving Ideas from Bahoukas

Day 31 We Talk OYSTERS!

In our area, oysters are popular. An oyster platter is an appreciated gift – possibly a perfect hostess gift! We also have several tins from oyster packing firms. These items are very collectible!

Oyster Platters and several oyster tins for the collector available at Bahoukas in Havre de Grace, MD

We also have this framed print “Unloading Oyster Luggers 1905” and the book Heavy Industries of Yester Year – Harford County’s Rural Heritage by Jack Shagena Jr. and Henry C. Peden, Jr. This book is available in our shop.

framed print "Unloading Oyster Luggers 1905"

Early French settlers designed small boats that would easily navigate the waters between ships and in Louisiana’s swamps.  These boats were called French canots; they had a rounded bottom and a small fin that allowed them to go in shallow water.  They became popular fishing boats and then oyster boats.  These canots eventually became known everywhere as New Orleans Oyster Luggers.

Click this link for more info.

Here’s a few tidbits about oysters and the Chesapeake Bay:

500 B.C.: The earliest evidence of oyster harvesting — shell deposits called middens — indicate that people living in the Chesapeake region were eating oysters and other shellfish as long as early as 2,500 B.C.

1600s: Early colonial settlers frequently remark on the size and quantity of oysters in the Chesapeake Bay. Oysters were likely harvested using boats, rakes and by wading into shallow water to simply gather them.

read more in the article in The Baltimore Sun

Yes, we have quite a variety of ideas in our 44 Days of Gift Giving. So come on in and visit us, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Day 30 – 44 Gift Giving Ideas from Bahoukas

KNIVES May Not Seem Appropriate

But a knife is a tool first and foremost. A pocket knife quite often will have more than one blade that will allow you to loosen/tighten a screw, or even open an envelope. Others can be used to whittle wood to create a toy or small sculpture, open a package, remove a splinter, and still others are used by hunters.

CLICK HERE for a great list of 101 Pocket Knife Uses

The photo below shows the following: at top is a Display Knife made for Jones & Company by Maxam. Below that are l. to r.: 1970s Buck Knife #317 with a black case – no longer made, a 1950s Boy Scout Knife “Be Prepared”, a pen knife by Imperial with 2″ blade and a Florida Souvenir Knife in sheath and it has a small compass on the handle. The bottom row is an advertising pocket knife with 3″ blade for P.K. Maurer & Scott Sales Inc. – says High Explosives Blasting Supplies and also IV. 3.0300 Phila. 27, PA, also a Johnston Mfg pearlized handled 2″ blade pocket knife, and a U.S. Military knife by Camillus 1977.

A variety of Knives available at Bahoukas in Havre de Grace - Buck Knife w/black case, Boy Scout Knife 1950s, Imperial Pocket knife, a Florida souvenir knife with compass on handle, Johnston Mfg peralized handle knife with 2" blade, and a US Military knife by Camillus 1977

KNIFE SAFETY

… because YOUR SAFETY matters to everyone at Bahoukas. We’ve attached this short video to help guide you in using your knife. All kids should learn from someone with experience. Think safety first! ENJOY!

Okay… stop in soon with your gift list, we’ll be watchin for ya and ready to help!

Day 29 of 44 Days of Gift Giving from Bahoukas

Nativities Are Collected Around the Globe

We have a few very collectible Nativity Scenes that include a 1950s Italian Set made up of 12 pieces, a Plastic Nativity from the 60s, an ornament light that can fit over a bulb on a tree from the 60s, a U.S. Zone – Germany set from the 40s in fair condition considering it’s made with Papier-mâché figures. One of these just might make someone on your gift list very happy!

from Wikipedia:

Papier-mâché is a composite material consisting of paper pieces or pulp, sometimes reinforced with textiles, bound with an adhesive, such as glue, starch, or wallpaper paste.

Top is an Italian Nativity from the 1950s, a 60s Plastic nativity and an ornament to fit over a bulb on a tree - both from the 60s, plus a 1940s set made of paper mache from U.S. Zone - Germany ... all at Bahoukas in Havre de Grace, MD.

You already know that here at Bahoukas Antique Mall we have some mighty fine ideas to help you with your gift giving. Let us know what you’re thinking about and we’ll do our darndest to help you find it. Hurry in… we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Day 28 of Bahoukas 44 Gift Giving Ideas

Everyone Needs A Santa or Two!

We have a delightful array of Santas available from silly and funny to a bank or a candle. The photo below includes a 1960s Santa-in-the-Outhouse, a Spaghetti Santa ceramic bank, a 1960s battery-operated animated Santa on a roof top, a stuffed Santa from the 1950s, in front is a plastic Irwin Santa, a small Santa mug, a rocking-chair Santa candle and a Santa Snow Globe (all from the 60s).

Fun choices of Santa collectibles at Bahoukas include 1970 Santa in the Outhouse, Spaghetti Santa ceramic bank, 60s battery operated animated Santa on roof top, stuffed Santa 1950s, Plastic Irwin Candy dispenser, 1960s Santa Mug, Rocking Chair Santa Candle and Santa Snow-Globe from the 1960s.

CLICK HERE for a great blog post that tells you how best to clean a spaghetti ceramic figure. It can really change an old piece to a real collectible.

Vintage spaghetti poodle dogs have so much charm and character. They come in a variety of colors and styles and can be found highly decorated with rhinestones, bows, glasses, hats, playing sports, chain leash with puppies, depicted as fireman, graduating students, band musicians, reading the daily newspaper, snooty, high fashion, smoking, brides and more!

 

Spaghetti Poodles were made from clay, porcelain, and ceramic; their “hair” was applied in various ways to form various textures to mimic an actual poodle’s hairdo. To accomplish the spaghetti look, decorators and designers would have different techniques like using tea strainers to push the material through it to form strands that were then affixed to the poodle giving it a pom-pom look or swirled onto to the poodle for a curly look. Spaghetti is very fragile and tends to break or chip during the years.    (this is discussing Spaghetti Poodles, but there are many ceramic items that use the ‘spaghetti’ technique) from Crazy4Me.com blog)

Whether you need a fun stocking stuffer, a new piece to add to your holiday decor, or just a cute little Santa for a bit of ho-ho-ho, stop by Bahoukas Antique Mall in Havre de Grace and see what we have to add to your holiday decorations and celebrations. Some of these pieces could also be added to a wreath for a special touch. So, as you know, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Day 25 – 44 Gift Giving Ideas From Bahoukas

CARD GAMES make for family time

Variety of card games for holiday gift giving from Bahoukas Antiques!

We have a wonderful variety of card games  – the ones at the top were from the 70s when 3M was creating games. In the basket are a variety of card games for kids of all ages – flash cards to crazy eights and everything inbetween. Remember, you can turn off the electronics, gather around the table, and enjoy laughter and chatter and a bit of competition when you open one of these card decks. Don’t forget we have puzzles and board games and more.

Visit Bahoukas Antique Mall soon and grab a couple stocking stuffers before our selection is picked over. We’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Day 24 – 44 Gift Giving Ideas from Bahoukas

Entertaining Comes to Mind for This Gift-Giving Idea

Before Thanksgiving we mentioned some fine decorating ideas for  your holiday table. We were thinking white and gold.

But today we offer shades of Ruby Red.

Hobnail Ruby Glass place setting, candy dish, sugar and creamer plus Avon Cape Cod Collection candlesticks and Salt and Pepper set found at Bahoukas Antiques in Havre de Grace

This sampling for festive holiday entertaining is a bit different from our white and gold that we posted earlier. Here we have Hobnail Ruby Glass place setting, candy dish, sugar and creamer, plus candlesticks and a salt & pepper set from the Avon Cape Cod Collection.

Entertaining should be fun and festive. Whether you’re looking for an entire set or just a few pieces, we have some wonderful items for you to choose from. We encourage you to hurry in to Bahoukas Antique Mall and pick out a few pieces to add to your holiday dining table, buffet table and mantle. We’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Day 19 – 44 Days of Gift Giving from Bahoukas

Baking and the Holidays – perfect match

The holidays bring thoughts of enjoying our favorite baked goods. Just thinking about them causes us to imagine the aroma of mom’s kitchen. We have family traditions and stories that are wrapped in the various specialties from the kitchen that make the holidays special.

Baking memorabilia including B&S brand shortening tin, old spices and food coloring, a variety of metal and plastic cookie cutters, a cake platter and cover, and a PA Dutch handmade Butter Mints tin

The above items are just a few of the many bakery items available in our shop. We also have rolling pins and various other kitchen utensils, wonderful mixing bowls, and even old cookie sheets and cake pans. (We like to think of them as well-seasoned!)

Beautiful cake plates of just about every design are also available.

If you CLICK THIS LINK, it will take you to another post of just a small selection of egg beaters as a sampling of the many kitchen tools you may need.

So stop by Bahoukas Antique Mall for the perfect collectible as a gift – of for you to actually use and enjoy while create your baking specialties this season. We’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Day 13 – 44 Days of Gift Giving Ideas from Bahoukas

Day 13 Offers Locks!

No – not Goldilocks! Nope – not locks of a canal. But locks that require a key or a combination.

Variety of locks including RR locks (B& O, PARR, Southern Rio Grand Pacific, a showcase lock and even handcuffs

Here we have several railroad locks: B&O RR, PA RR, and Southern Rio Grande Pacific. We also have Master locks,a showcase lock, and even ‘handcuffs.’ We have a variety of old keys as well.

Over 6,000 years ago, locks may have been simply special knots tied in a rope that would tell the owner that someone had been in their belongings. From History of Locks, we offer this interesting quote:

History of mechanical locks started over 6 thousand years ago in Ancient Egypt, where locksmith first managed to create simple but effective pin tumbler lock that was made entirely from wood. It consisted of the wooden post that was affixed to the door, and a horizontal bolt that slid into the post. This bolt had set of openings which were filled with pins. Specially designed large and heavy wooden key was shaped like modern toothbrush with pegs that corresponded to the holes and pins in the lock. This key could be inserted into opening and lifted, which would move the pins and allow security bolt to be moved.

The History of Locks also mentioned this interesting bit of information concerning the Dark and Middle Ages in reference to locksmiths:

to try to confuse or compound lockpickers with new tactics. Instead of one simple lock they created multiple key mechanisms, increasingly complicated key designs, they obscured keyholes with detailed ornaments, created fake keyholes (with fake mechanisms inside), and more.

As to handcuffs, we’ve learned from A History of Handcuffs that …

The first recorded mention of handcuffs appears in Virgil’s telling of the myth of Proteus…

MASTER LOCK PADLOCKSphoto from masterlock.com

Most of us are familiar with the name “Master Lock” and probably have owned a few over the years. We can think of bicycle locks, a lock for our school locker, or maybe even a lock on our tool box!

Master Lock was founded by Harry Soref in 1921.

In 1924 they started running ads like the one in this photo from their website,

If Bank Vault Doors and battle ships were built in laminated layers of steel for greater strength, why not make padlocks the same way? The first Laminated Steel padlock was invented and patented on April 22nd.

And did you know that Harry Soref helped Houdini? Here’s a quote from the Master Lock website:

By 1925 Harry Soref became a recognized icon with padlocks. Escape artist Harry Houdini visited Soref after he was unable to escape from a pair of handcuffs. Soref advised Houdini on trick places to hide padlock keys between his fingers and under his tongue during stage shows.

… and yes, they even did really well during Prohibition!

On February 20th, 1928 a container of 147,600 padlocks was shipped to federal agents in New York City. These locks were used to lock down many of the establishments that continued to sell the outlawed alcohol during prohibition.

These are just a few tidbits we discover when we write our blog posts.

No matter … stop by and see if one of these items would make a perfect gift for the magician on your Christmas List or maybe a great decorative item! We’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Day 7 – Gift Giving Ideas from Bahoukas

Don’t be ‘puzzled’ – it means 37 days left…

Puzzles for all ages available at Bahoukas

I’ll bet you haven’t thought of Bahoukas to find unique puzzles for the “enigmatologist” on your list! Well, here’s a sampling of what we have available. From JigSaw puzzles for children and adults, a Rubix Cube, and a variety of uniquely shaped puzzles in nearly every form.

enigmatologist

noun [countable]

someone who studies and writes mathematical, word or logic puzzles

enigmatology also enigmatography

noun [uncountable]

‘The annual war with words was spawned a quarter-century ago by enigmatologist Will Shortz, current puzzle editor of The New York Times.’

from DALLAS MORNING NEWS 9TH MARCH 2003

Do you love crossword puzzles?

Will Shortz - National Public Radio's (NPR's) puzzle master
We have a few books around our shop. But we also found this interesting website for the ‘cruciverbalist on you list.
Maybe you follow Will Shortz as the Puzzle Master on his Weekend Edition Sunday Morning NPR program!
Will also edits the NY Times Crossword Puzzle.
If you love these, just do a search for Will Shortz and NPR Puzzle Master or the New York Times for plenty of information about Will and also plenty about solving puzzles.
Have fun! But don’t forget to stop by our shop to find that intriguing puzzle that may stump one of those puzzle-lovers on your gift list. Well, at least for an hour or two!
We’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Day 6 – Gift Giving Ideas at Bahoukas

Weather Will Not Deter Our Holiday Celebrations

various items to keep an eye on the weather including thermometers, barometers, humidity

George gathered up the above items to add to your home or office decor – or to give as a very useful and beautiful gift. More importantly, you’ll always know the weather pattern where you’re at! The tall black case with brass trim includes a thermometer, barometer and hygrometer. We know a thermometer gives us the temperature. But do you know what a barometer or hygrometer tell us?

Temperature and humidity are the two most basic of weather variables and all of us are interested in what they are right now and what they will be in the future. Hygrometers measure the amount of moisture (or water vapor) in the air, commonly referred to as humidity. By knowing the percentage of humidity in the air along with the current temperature, dew point temperature and heat index can be calculated. These factors can be important to those who work and play outside. They are also important to farmers and other agricultural concerns with regard to stress in livestock or plants, or in properly irrigating crops. With an easy-to-read display and fast response time, analog hygrometers offer excellent accuracy and the ability to be calibrated.   from weathershack.com 

Barometric pressure plays a large part in the ever-changing weather pattern.

As a very loose rule, a high-pressure area will be clear, and a low-pressure area will be cloudy and rainy.  from Science: How Stuff Works

The ‘pilot wheel’ is a thermometer created as an advertisement for Carney-Berman Mfg. Other items include “Old Salt” wood carvings, a coffee grinder thermometer, wood framed barometer-thermometer-hygrometer, a plastic Springfield thermometer, a woman silhouette that is a thermometer and an advertisement for Campus Pharmacy. There is also a glass thermometer for fish tanks by H-B Instrument Co., made in Phila PA USA,  and a small a/c thermometer.

We doubt that you’ve really thought about all the possibilities for gift-giving available to you at Bahoukas Antique Mall. Be sure to stop in soon and discover for yourself. We’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Day 5 – Gift Giving Ideas from Bahoukas

White and Gold – beautiful theme for the holidays

Beautiful white and gold place setting, tea set for the holidays

There are many combinations that can be created for your Holiday table and buffet. This is just one sampling. Beautiful gold and white would most certainly add an elegant touch to your holiday theme. We have place settings, salt & pepper shakers, an amazingly stunning gold tea set, and a variety of serving dishes. Or many you just want a ‘splash’ of interest – a serving dish … or maybe just the tea set!

Mix and match items give your personality to your holiday decor. Here at Bahoukas Antique Mall we have plenty to ‘mix & match.’

We encourage you to click on this link to visit RealSimple.com and get 26 unique ways to celebrate the holidays with a bit of splash! Don’t forget that along with what we post, Bahoukas has plenty of wonderful finds to put that ‘splash’ in your holiday theme! We’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Do you know what a ‘Dover’ is?

It’s that time of year when baking …

and cooking things like soups and stews help us to take the chill off the house. We thought it was also a perfect time to share a most unique implement that many of you have in your home –  the simple rotary egg beater and a bit of its history!

Below is a collection of egg beaters available at Bahoukas Antique Mall. Top row (l to r) include red-handled Merry Whirl 1916 egg beater (USA), 1916 egg beater, A&J 1923 egg beater – red or green handled – made in USA, and a steel handled egg beater (USA).

a variety of egg beaters from the early 1900s

Bottom row includes (l to r): Ladd egg beater by United Royalty Corp NY – 1929, high speed super center drive beater, child’s egg beater, One Hand Whip – this one you squeeze, 1904 Dover Pattern Improved egg beater (USA), Dunlap’s Sanitary Cream & Egg Whip – no spatter/no waste – 1916, and an A&J Whippit – cream whip.

…By the 1870s, the Dover cast-iron rotary eggbeater hit the market and revolutionized cooking in American kitchens. Now, that 90-minute chore took just 5 minutes. Cooks all over the country could rest their weary arms and still produce light, fluffy egg whites. In fact, Dover eggbeaters became so common that all eggbeaters were called Dovers, even when manufactured by another company.

 

…(Taplan created an improved Dover)…In 1903, this eggbeater could have been purchased at any one of the 10 hardware stores listed in the La Crosse city directory. Fifteen years earlier, such a fancy tool would have cost more than a dollar, but, by the turn of the century, these beaters were so common they could be purchased for less than 10 cents.

 

from LaCrosse Tribune

Yep, if you’ve read this far, you’ve learned that a “Dover” was what most folks called the egg beater – kind of like when we use the trademarked “Kleenex” to mean a facial tissue!

Amazingly, it took nearly 90 minutes to get fluffy egg whites until the egg beater reduced that chore to 5 minutes!

Would you like to know exactly how the rotary egg beater works?

CLICK HERE for a description of the mechanics of this labor-saving kitchen tool from the BBC – history of the world or you can watch this video!

Imagine…. it took 90 minutes to accomplish those fluffy egg whites before the invention of the egg beater!

Happy Baking!

When you need a break, or a practical tool, stop by Bahoukas Antique Mall. We’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Time to Fall Back

Digital or Analog?

Today, with everyone reading time on their smart phones or computers, analog time seems to be nearly a thing of the past. Can your children tell time on an analog clock/watch? Not sure what that is?

One of the most common examples of the difference between analog and digital devices is a clock. On the analog clock, the time is represented by hands that spin around a dial and point to a location on the dial that represents the approximate time. On a digital clock, a numeric display indicates the exact time.   from Dummies.com 

10 min 'hour glass' , Fisher Price clock, Burlington SPecial Pocket Watch, Coca Cola watch w/diamonds, and a travel alarm clock by Westclox

Before the blinking digital clocks on our stoves, computers, and nightstands, we used a variety of timepieces. Above is a small collection from Bahoukas Antique Mall that include: a 10-minute hourglass used as a timer, a Travel Alarm Clock by Westclox, a Fisher Price children’s clock, a Burlington Special Pocket Watch, and a beautiful Coca Cola watch w/diamonds.

While doing a bit of research for this post, we discovered this tidbit in reference to a Lord Baltimore Alarm Clock by Westclox. Do you have one of these?

IMPORTANT REMINDER

This weekend we ‘fall back’ as we turn our clocks back one hour to standard time. You get an extra hour of sleep before heading out to church on Sunday. Enjoy and savor. For those who love the morning sun, smile!

Watch for our next post when we share some wonderful older clocks including a grandfather clock and a mantle clock available at Bahoukas. Til then, make a plan to stop by Bahoukas. We’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Collectible Coffee Tins

Antique Coffee Tins are highly collectible…

a display of antique coffee tins

In researching a bit more about collecting coffee tins, we learned some interesting facts. First, that collecting antique coffee tins is second only to collecting tobacco tins. But this excerpt from Collectors Weekly is most interesting:

The widespread practice of packing food in tin cans and containers was a direct result of the public’s acceptance of the Germ Theory of Disease. In the 19th century, many Americans were still willfully oblivious to the breakthrough research of Louis Pasteur and Robert Koch. People were more interested in the pitches of snake-oil salesman and their medicine shows, where cure-all elixirs and exotic balms in medicine bottles were sold. It never occurred to many of these good folk that the best way to be healthy might simply to be clean.

 

  • In the early 1800s, cleanliness was one way for the upper classes to distinguish themselves from the working and lower classes, as only the wealthy had access to water and soap. However, as germ theory became more prevalent during the Victorian Era, it became unacceptable for the working poor to be dirty. Most food was displayed and accessed at the local five-and-dimes in communal food barrels—grimy, germ-infested hands would not do.

These days, people of means tend to dismiss canned or “processed” food as something people without access to fresh food eat. But in the late 1800s, food in tins was highly desirable. It was considered much more sanitary, and therefore healthier, than food offered in bins or barrels.

…from Collectors Weekly

The Vintage Virtue website discusses collecting coffee tins with this introduction:

The coffee tin came into being as long ago as the early 1800’s in a time when most people bought fresh green coffee beans to roast and grind fresh at home. Pre-roasted and packaged coffee became popular much later in the late 1880’s. Over the years, coffee containers were produced in many shapes and sizes; they could be square, cylindrical, rectangular, or trapezoid shaped and ranged in size from one ounce sample tins to large bins holding more than fifty pounds of coffee. Coffee came in boxes and in pails with metal handles and in addition to tin, some containers were made of cardboard and others featured paper labels over tin. The lids also can in a variety of styles that evolved other the years. The early tins had hinged lids or lids that could be pulled off. Later tins were made with pry lids, slip lids, and lids that screwed off and on, these were followed by lids that utilized keys for removal.

… from VintageVirtue.net

The advertising, as in the graphics on the tins, has also made them highly collectible. The graphics became more interesting as companies realized that making the tins reusable with very beautiful graphics added to the appeal for their product. Ah yes…. advertising!

Now that you appreciate a bit more the value of the ‘tin can’ … stop by Bahoukas Antique Mall to see the many collectible tins we have for coffee, tobacco and other products.

Wall Pockets

Bring Summer Indoors

Sunflower Wall Pocket Set by Howard Holt at Bahoukas in Havre de Grace

Wall Pockets are a wonderful way to bring a little summer sunshine into your home as the cooler weather announces the arrival of Autumn.

 

The photo at left is a set of 3 Smiley Flowers by Holt-Howard. These would make a cute addition to a sunroom or a kitchen with a wee bit of ivy growing from them. Below is a bit of history of the Holt-Howard Corp.

 

 

 

 

 

Holt-Howard was an importer that started working in New York City in 1949 and moved to Stamford, Connecticut, in 1955. John and Robert Howard and Grant Holt started Holt-Howard, whose first products were Christmas items made and sold in the United States. The company sold many types of table accessories, such as condiment jars, decanters, spoon holders, and saltshakers. The figures shown on some of its pieces had a cartoon-like quality. The company was bought out by General Housewares Corporation in 1969. Holt-Howard pieces are often marked with the name and the year or HH and the year stamped in black. The HH mark was used until 1974. There was also a black and silver label. Production of Holt-Howard ceased in 1990. Similar pieces are being made today by Grant Holt, one of the founders, and are marked GHA.     from Kovels.com

These delightful wall pockets include a fruit basket, cornucopia covered in rosebuds, Czechoslovakian heart shaped covered in flowers and a deep blue tube with design

Here are a few more beautiful wall pockets. There really is a design for every decor. Top left is a basket filled with fruit and top right is a cornucopia with rosebud decoration by Lefton China. Bottom right is a Czechoslovakian heart shape covered in florals and the deep blue tube on the bottom right has a bird/flower design. Besides tucking an air plant or a bit of ivy in them, they could also be used to store pencils, paint brushes or other small items.

Wall pockets of yesteryear can add a dash of wonderful color and creativity. So drop by Bahoukas Antique Mall soon and see what wonderful treasures you might find to add your personality to your home and office! We’ll be watchin’ for you!

Art Tucked Among The Antiques

Art IS in The Eye of the Beholder…

Lionel Barrymore is best known for his character “Mr. Potter” in the 1946 film It’s a Wonderful Life. Of course he is known for many other performances in movies, stage and radio. But did you know he was also …

Composer; graphic artist; novelist

Barrymore also composed music. His works ranged from solo piano pieces to large-scale orchestral works, such as “Tableau Russe,” which was performed twice in Dr. Kildare’s Wedding Day (1941), first by Nils Asther on piano and later by a full symphony orchestra. His piano compositions, “Scherzo Grotesque” and “Song Without Words”, were published by G. Schirmer in 1945. Upon the death of his brother John in 1942, he composed a memoriam, which was performed by the Philadelphia Orchestra. He also composed the theme song of the radio program Mayor of the Town.

Barrymore was a skillful graphic artist, creating etchings and drawings. For years, he maintained an artist’s shop and studio attached to his home in Los Angeles. Some of his etchings were included in the Hundred Prints of the Year.

He wrote a historical novel, Mr. Cantonwine: A Moral Tale (1953).                          from Wikipedia

Placemat with art "San Pedro" by Lionel Barrymore

This place mat is titled “San Pedro” and is part of a set created by Lionel Barrymore.

We have a beautiful set of dinner mats (place mats) from this well known actor who would rather sketch than act. He loved the sea. This beautiful set of place mats would be wonderful on your table or even, perhaps, framed and hung on a wall. They were originally “presented with the compliments and good wishes of The Holland Mfg. Company of Baltimore, NY.”

Place mat from a collection by Lionel Barrymore, titled "Point Pleasant."

This place mat is titled “Point Pleasant” and is part of a set created by Lionel Barrymore.

A few other unique pieces tucked among our 2200 sq ft of wonderful antiques and collectibles include these smaller pieces. On the left is an adorable baby with teddy bear that has a curved cover with black decoration, painted by Charlotte Cox Becker. Born in 1901 and died in 1984, she lived and worked in both Germany and the U.S. and is best known for children’s book illustration, figure and genre, lithography. Her baby pictures were very popular and still are today. We do not have any information on the silhouettes.

Art pieces available at Bahoukas Antiques include this beautiful child with teddy bear by Charlotte Becker, and two small framed silhouettes: a lady at a spinning wheel and a lady losing her hat in the wind while walking her dog.

As you have seen here, art is very much a part of the wonderful discoveries you might make when browsing the many shelves and corners of Bahoukas Antique Mall and Beer MuZeum. We look forward to giving you a warm ‘hello’ next time you drop by. See you soon!

70,000 BC and oil lamps are still valuable today

When the power goes out, what do YOU do?

oil - kerosene lamps for home use - one with clear globe - one in orange

The simple oil lamp has a very long history keeping humans safe, working, and comfortable.

After human race first tamed the fire and started to use it as a light source, a need appeared for a smaller, controllable flame – a more sophisticated solution, if you will. First such solution was an oil lamp some 70.000 B.C. Early humans used shells, hollow rocks or any nonflammable material as a container and in it some moss soaked in animal fat which they would ignite and it would burn with a flame.   from History of Oil Lamps

Then in Egypt, Greece, and Rome they began to make the lamps out of man-made materials: terracotta, bronze, stone and alabaster in a shape of a dish that would hold oil and a place for a wick that would prolong burning and prevented the whole surface of the oil to catch fire.

That design stayed the same until the 18th century when Aime Argand, Swiss chemist, invented and patented “Argand Lamp”. His lamp consisted of container for oil as all the other lamps but had cylindrical wick to give larger surface for a larger flame and glass tube chimney around the flame to direct the draft, make a stronger flame and make lamp safer for carrying.    from History of Oil Lamps

Here’s another great link for more details on Aime Argand, the Swiss chemist.

Then in the mid-19th century, kerosene lamps came on to the scene. We still use them today, mostly for ambiance. But, here at Bahoukas Antique Mall we also believe they have utilitarian value. If you’ve endured a nasty winter storm that kept the power off for days or a hurricane that meant battening down the hatches and surviving days without power, you know the value of a kerosene lamp to help you get through the tough times.

But the ordinary oil lamp also shared in the history of our developing country. A simple oil lamp allowed people to stay up later, to work in their barns and sheds, to read in the evening. They were used for signaling in the railroad industry and  to light highways and towns.

railroad, barn and highway oil lamps

On the left is a Pennsylvania Railroad Lantern, 1920s, by Dressel in the U.S.
The middle is a Barn Lantern by Feuerhand of Germany, 1930s.
The Highway Lantern on the right is by Dietz of the U.S., 1930s.

In the days before city lights and GPS, railroad lanterns served a very important purpose: they communicated signals at night between trains and stations. Sometimes, a timely lantern signal meant the difference between life and death. In one romanticized 19th-century story, for example, a 15-year-old girl named Kate Shelley saved the Fast Atlantic Express from a broken bridge by alerting a station agent, whose lantern signal to the train averted disaster.  from Collectors Weekly

So even today, one of our lamps might just make a power outage a bit more comfortable as you wait for your electric to come back on. Stop by today and see what we have available – lots of styles and sizes!