We Predict a Halloween Party in Your Near Future!

Bahoukas loves a party. Halloween is a perfect reason!

With a busy week of Homecoming, a Carnival, Halloween activities and sun-filled October days, you’re bound to be attending or hosting your own Halloween party. Here are some items to create a memorable event. Below are cast iron characters – a ghost and a nodder (bobble head) witch. Add these to your centerpiece to make your table or buffet really special.

Cast Iron Halloween collectibles - ghost on leftl, witch ghost on right

In the following photo, we show you just a few of the many wonderful vintage Halloween collectibles available at Bahoukas Antique Mall. A plastic puppet, small pumpkin etc for favors, a larger pumpkin to hold a candle, a tambourine with Halloween decoration, favors, and cupcake decorations, etc. Stop in and see the variety of really fun Halloween collectibles. Hurry, you’ll want them for your party this week!

Halloween party items - witch puppet (plastic), pumpkin, favors, small pumpkin for candle, tamborine, and various small items for cake decorating, etc.

With Halloween retail sales projected to be 9.1 billion (yes that’s Billion – with a ‘B’), we know you’ll want to check out some really great pieces to add a wee bit of nostalgia to your decorations. And don’t forget, we have a lot of unique items to add just the finishing touch you need for your very unique costume. See you soon. We’ll be watchin’ for you!

Carnival Collectibles

With the Carnival in town …

It seems like a perfect time to show off a few of our carnival collectibles.

Chalk Statues - Shirley Temple 1960s, carney stick carnival glass Fisher Price merry go round 972 musical carousel horse - porcelain and 1950s Kiddy Go Round

Remember when you used to toss coins into the Carnival Glass dishes to win a prize (or the dish)? We have some beautiful Carnival Glass collectibles. We have a carny stick to use to draw attention to your grand show! Included above are chalk statues of Shirley Temple from the 1960s; a Fisher-Price merry-go-round 1972; a beautiful porcelain, musical Carousel Horse; and a 1950s Kiddy-Go-Round by Unique Art Mfg. Co.

In the meantime, be sure to grab the kids and head to the Havre de Grace Carnival (Oct 19-22, 2017) And pop into our shop on your way, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Carnival! Halloween! Yay October!

Are you looking for unique Halloween costumes?

We just might have items you’re looking for at Bahoukas Antique Mall. Besides the standard mask or store costume, we have an eclectic selection of items that may add to your costume fun!

Child's nurse costume and a yoda mask available at Bahoukas in Havre de Grace MD

Yoda the legendary Jedi Master is always a favorite. This plastic mask is from 1979. But this size 6 child’s nurse’s costume is delightful. From the 1960s, it includes a beautiful navy blue cape with red lining, white cap and dress with a light blue jumper. Someone could be made very happy with this collectible.

size 6 child's nurse's Halloween costume - red-lined navy blue cape, white cap and dress, light blue jumper - all at Bahoukas Antique Mall

But our costuming doesn’t end there… are you looking for the perfect addition to your costume? Maybe a military hat? Or a Preakness hat? Maybe you need a bit of lace or jewelry to add the finishing touch. Don’t forget we have a lot of items in our toy area that might finish off the perfect costume. Stop in and see what great find you may discover.

Watch for upcoming posts related to the Carnival that’s arrived in town for the HdG Independence Commission fundraiser, and more items for Halloween party decorations! Stop by Bahoukas Antique Mall today. We’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Oktoberfest and Bahoukas Beer MuZeum

Gemütlichkeit: (gu-moot-lish-kite)

This word has a very broad  meaning. It is an atmosphere of comfort, peace, and acceptance, and it is what Oktoberfest is all about.

from the Alpine VIllage Center we found this delightful glossary of words and phrases to enjoy our Havre de Grace’s 3rd annual OKTOBERFEST, Oct 14, 2017 from noon – 7pm  and the 5th Annual American Legion OKTOBERFEST same day from 9am – 3pm! Of course, here at Bahoukas Beer MuZeum we have the perfect collectibles to bring a little Oktoberfest home. Here’s a link to all the October Events in Havre de Grace.

If you want to carry your very own beer stein to the Oktoberfest, visit us at Bahoukas Beer MuZeum…. we have a pretty nice selection to choose from…

Beer collectibles including bottles, cans, beer steins, at Bahoukas Beer MuZeum in Havre de Grace

In the above photo we have (Back – left to right) a 2-handled German Oktoberfest beer stein, Dogfish Head Tap Handle, Chesapeake Brewery Terrapin Turtle – crown top – bottle, Budweiser flat-top can (req’d church key), Neuschwanstein Castle lidded German beer stein. Front, left to right, include Tennents Lager “Penny cans, National Bohemian (Natty Bo) glass and church key, cast iron bottle openers (far left – drunk on a pole 1954, center – goat 1950s, 4-eyed, wall mounted, reproduction and a 1940s Syroco – Syracuse Ornamental Company – horse head bottle opener.) Click on the link for a history of the Tennent’s Lager Lovelies.

But we don’t stop here with Brewmania, check out these advertising mirrors, lamp, and signs.

 

Ballantine clock sign

Ballantine ale & beer clock sign

 

Yuengling mirror with scene painted on it

Yuengling mirror with golf scene

 

Yuengling reproduction of 1907 calendar poster with puppies on it

reproduction of 1907 Yuengling calendar with puppies

 

Pabst clock-mirror collectible at Bahoukas Beer MuZeum in Havre de Grace

Pabst Blue Ribbon mirror/clock sign

 

National Boh advertising sign - round barrel

National Boh advertising sign – round barrel

 

Natty Boh red-white striped apron in frame

Natty Boh red-white apron in frame

 

two advertising signs include top - Busch beer with two people on horseback on a mountain top and bottom - Coors Light porthole with crab

Two advertising signs include top – Busch beer with two people on horseback on a mountain top and bottom – Coors Light porthole with crab painted on mirror

 

Tiffany style Piels Real Draft lamp (advertising) at Bahoukas Beer MuZeum

Hanging Tiffany-style lamp advertising piece for Piels Real Draft Beer

 

Again, Bahoukas Beer MuZeum offers some fine pieces for you brewmania collection or to add to your Oktoberfest celebrations! We leave you with this phrase from the Alpine Village site!

Oans, zwoa, g’suffa!: (ōnns tswō g’zoo-fa) “One, two, drink up!” This the very Bavarian way of saying it.

Stop in today, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Collectible Coffee Tins

Antique Coffee Tins are highly collectible…

a display of antique coffee tins

In researching a bit more about collecting coffee tins, we learned some interesting facts. First, that collecting antique coffee tins is second only to collecting tobacco tins. But this excerpt from Collectors Weekly is most interesting:

The widespread practice of packing food in tin cans and containers was a direct result of the public’s acceptance of the Germ Theory of Disease. In the 19th century, many Americans were still willfully oblivious to the breakthrough research of Louis Pasteur and Robert Koch. People were more interested in the pitches of snake-oil salesman and their medicine shows, where cure-all elixirs and exotic balms in medicine bottles were sold. It never occurred to many of these good folk that the best way to be healthy might simply to be clean.

 

  • In the early 1800s, cleanliness was one way for the upper classes to distinguish themselves from the working and lower classes, as only the wealthy had access to water and soap. However, as germ theory became more prevalent during the Victorian Era, it became unacceptable for the working poor to be dirty. Most food was displayed and accessed at the local five-and-dimes in communal food barrels—grimy, germ-infested hands would not do.

These days, people of means tend to dismiss canned or “processed” food as something people without access to fresh food eat. But in the late 1800s, food in tins was highly desirable. It was considered much more sanitary, and therefore healthier, than food offered in bins or barrels.

…from Collectors Weekly

The Vintage Virtue website discusses collecting coffee tins with this introduction:

The coffee tin came into being as long ago as the early 1800’s in a time when most people bought fresh green coffee beans to roast and grind fresh at home. Pre-roasted and packaged coffee became popular much later in the late 1880’s. Over the years, coffee containers were produced in many shapes and sizes; they could be square, cylindrical, rectangular, or trapezoid shaped and ranged in size from one ounce sample tins to large bins holding more than fifty pounds of coffee. Coffee came in boxes and in pails with metal handles and in addition to tin, some containers were made of cardboard and others featured paper labels over tin. The lids also can in a variety of styles that evolved other the years. The early tins had hinged lids or lids that could be pulled off. Later tins were made with pry lids, slip lids, and lids that screwed off and on, these were followed by lids that utilized keys for removal.

… from VintageVirtue.net

The advertising, as in the graphics on the tins, has also made them highly collectible. The graphics became more interesting as companies realized that making the tins reusable with very beautiful graphics added to the appeal for their product. Ah yes…. advertising!

Now that you appreciate a bit more the value of the ‘tin can’ … stop by Bahoukas Antique Mall to see the many collectible tins we have for coffee, tobacco and other products.

Wall Pockets

Bring Summer Indoors

Sunflower Wall Pocket Set by Howard Holt at Bahoukas in Havre de Grace

Wall Pockets are a wonderful way to bring a little summer sunshine into your home as the cooler weather announces the arrival of Autumn.

 

The photo at left is a set of 3 Smiley Flowers by Holt-Howard. These would make a cute addition to a sunroom or a kitchen with a wee bit of ivy growing from them. Below is a bit of history of the Holt-Howard Corp.

 

 

 

 

 

Holt-Howard was an importer that started working in New York City in 1949 and moved to Stamford, Connecticut, in 1955. John and Robert Howard and Grant Holt started Holt-Howard, whose first products were Christmas items made and sold in the United States. The company sold many types of table accessories, such as condiment jars, decanters, spoon holders, and saltshakers. The figures shown on some of its pieces had a cartoon-like quality. The company was bought out by General Housewares Corporation in 1969. Holt-Howard pieces are often marked with the name and the year or HH and the year stamped in black. The HH mark was used until 1974. There was also a black and silver label. Production of Holt-Howard ceased in 1990. Similar pieces are being made today by Grant Holt, one of the founders, and are marked GHA.     from Kovels.com

These delightful wall pockets include a fruit basket, cornucopia covered in rosebuds, Czechoslovakian heart shaped covered in flowers and a deep blue tube with design

Here are a few more beautiful wall pockets. There really is a design for every decor. Top left is a basket filled with fruit and top right is a cornucopia with rosebud decoration by Lefton China. Bottom right is a Czechoslovakian heart shape covered in florals and the deep blue tube on the bottom right has a bird/flower design. Besides tucking an air plant or a bit of ivy in them, they could also be used to store pencils, paint brushes or other small items.

Wall pockets of yesteryear can add a dash of wonderful color and creativity. So drop by Bahoukas Antique Mall soon and see what wonderful treasures you might find to add your personality to your home and office! We’ll be watchin’ for you!

Vintage Torpedo Soda to Igloo Ink to Clay Beer Bottle

Vintage Bottles for Every Use!

vintage bottles including torpedo, igloo ink, blob top, crown top, and a clay Weiss Beer bottle - all available at Bahoukas Antiques in Havre de Grace, MD

The above photo is a small history of bottles all in one photo and available at Bahoukas Antique Mall. They include a beautiful torpedo soda bottle with a blob top from Greene King & Sons Limited of Bury, St. Edmonds. There are two ink bottles: igloo shaped and cone shaped, a Kiehl & Kiefer blog top soda bottle, a Wagner Ginger Ale bottle, a clay bottle for Weiss Beer Brewery (Baltimore), and a Chas. Zech glass soda bottle.

igloo shaped vintage ink bottle can be found at Bahoukas in Havre de Grace

This link to history of bottlesfrom the Society for Historical Archaeology Inc. website, gives an outstanding amount of information regarding the bottles we’ve displayed. It shares the details on the many styles of ink bottles that were made.

The ink bottle to the left is called an ‘igloo style’ by J & IEM. Here’s an interesting quote about the use of ink before the late 1800s from the Society for Historical Archaeology Inc. website.

 In Europe, glass inkwells dating from the early 18th century have been noted and advertisements for ink bottles date at least as early as the 1770s (Van den Bossche 2001; Faulkner 2009).  Historically, it was not until the late 18th to early 19th century that ink was commonly available commercially in liquid form.  Up until that time the most common commercial forms were as wafers, cakes, sticks, or as a powder from which the purchaser/user would add water to make ink.  Druggists as well as printers, stationary and bookshop keepers often prepared, bottled, and sold ink during the 19th century and before in the New World (McKearin & Wilson 1978).

 

CHas. Zech Lancaster PA crown top vintage soda bottle available at Bahoukas Antique Mall in Havre de Grace Marylandblob top vintage glass bottles in Havre de Grace, MD at Bahoukas

This Chas. Zech vintage soda bottle from Lancaster, PA is a crown top soda bottle.

 

The left photo shows a blob top bottle. The one below shows the crown top. This page from Aqua Explorers gives a wonderful history of bottle tops throughout history.

crown top of a vintage glass bottle at Bahoukas

 

 

 

Another very interesting early glass bottle is the Torpedo Bottle, shown below. Here’s a link to a bit more information regarding the torpedo style vintage bottle – “The idea was that the soda kept in contact with the cork and stopped the cork from shrinking.”

vintage torpedo bottle for Greene King & Sons can be purchased at Bahoukas in Havre de Grace, MD

The beautiful K on the back side of the Kiehl & Kiefer blob top soda bottle which can be found at Bahoukas in Havre de Grace

Vintage Kiehl and Kiefer blob top soda bottle, Lancaster PA

 

This vintage bottle of Kiehl & Kiefer is a blob top soda bottle. What’s really beautiful is the “K” on the back side of the bottle,

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriately we happen to have a Christian Wagner Ginger Ale vintage bottle with crown top, (Oh, you didn’t know that George ‘Bahoukas’ is really George Wagner!)

Christian Wagner Giner Ale XXX vintage soda bottle at Bahoukas in Havre de Grace

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The final vintage piece is a clay bottle by Sandkuhler’s for Weiss Beer Brewery of Baltimore.

Stop in to Bahoukas in Havre de Grace and discover great buys and learn a little history in the most leisurely way!

 

 

 

 

YIKES – Batteries Not Included

1950s Japanese Toys were a marvel!

Battery Operated 1950s Japanese Toys includes a bear, a firetruck and a bartender all available at Bahoukas in Havre de Grace, Maryland

Every parent dreaded the ‘batteries NOT included’ especially if they forgot to put them in a gift for Christmas or a birthday! But 1950s battery operated Japanese Toys were extremely popular. Actually these toys were popular for young and old.

After opening its doors to the West during the Meiji period (1868 – 1912), Japan quickly transformed into an industrialized nation following in the footsteps of the industrial revolution that similarly drove much cultural change in America and Europe. Japan especially flourished during and after the period of the Great War (1914 – 1918), as Western production and exports of goods, including toys, came to a virtual standstill. During this Golden Era, Japanese toy manufacturers focused on creating unique toys for both the domestic and international markets, including the now-classic wind-up and battery-operated toys (then considered a novelty and break-through in toy technology).     from ardenanne.com

In the above photo we have a bear that pours soda and drinks it, fire  dept. 12 fire truck that lights up while bell dingles and the driver steers, and a bartender who pours and shakes the drink while smoke comes out his ears. Ha ha ha, definitely fun toys and especially entertaining back in the 50s.

These collectibles are available at Bahoukas Antique Mall in Havre de Grace, MD. Stop in and see them for yourself. We’ll be watchin’ for you!

Art Tucked Among The Antiques

Art IS in The Eye of the Beholder…

Lionel Barrymore is best known for his character “Mr. Potter” in the 1946 film It’s a Wonderful Life. Of course he is known for many other performances in movies, stage and radio. But did you know he was also …

Composer; graphic artist; novelist

Barrymore also composed music. His works ranged from solo piano pieces to large-scale orchestral works, such as “Tableau Russe,” which was performed twice in Dr. Kildare’s Wedding Day (1941), first by Nils Asther on piano and later by a full symphony orchestra. His piano compositions, “Scherzo Grotesque” and “Song Without Words”, were published by G. Schirmer in 1945. Upon the death of his brother John in 1942, he composed a memoriam, which was performed by the Philadelphia Orchestra. He also composed the theme song of the radio program Mayor of the Town.

Barrymore was a skillful graphic artist, creating etchings and drawings. For years, he maintained an artist’s shop and studio attached to his home in Los Angeles. Some of his etchings were included in the Hundred Prints of the Year.

He wrote a historical novel, Mr. Cantonwine: A Moral Tale (1953).                          from Wikipedia

Placemat with art "San Pedro" by Lionel Barrymore

This place mat is titled “San Pedro” and is part of a set created by Lionel Barrymore.

We have a beautiful set of dinner mats (place mats) from this well known actor who would rather sketch than act. He loved the sea. This beautiful set of place mats would be wonderful on your table or even, perhaps, framed and hung on a wall. They were originally “presented with the compliments and good wishes of The Holland Mfg. Company of Baltimore, NY.”

Place mat from a collection by Lionel Barrymore, titled "Point Pleasant."

This place mat is titled “Point Pleasant” and is part of a set created by Lionel Barrymore.

A few other unique pieces tucked among our 2200 sq ft of wonderful antiques and collectibles include these smaller pieces. On the left is an adorable baby with teddy bear that has a curved cover with black decoration, painted by Charlotte Cox Becker. Born in 1901 and died in 1984, she lived and worked in both Germany and the U.S. and is best known for children’s book illustration, figure and genre, lithography. Her baby pictures were very popular and still are today. We do not have any information on the silhouettes.

Art pieces available at Bahoukas Antiques include this beautiful child with teddy bear by Charlotte Becker, and two small framed silhouettes: a lady at a spinning wheel and a lady losing her hat in the wind while walking her dog.

As you have seen here, art is very much a part of the wonderful discoveries you might make when browsing the many shelves and corners of Bahoukas Antique Mall and Beer MuZeum. We look forward to giving you a warm ‘hello’ next time you drop by. See you soon!

Have you seen IT?

We cannot help sharing our CLOWNS!

L-R The Simpsons Krusty the Clown, clown nightlight, Roly Poly clown, clown salt shaker, clown cup, giant clown PEZ dispenser - Peter Pez, plastic clown with hoop, squeak toy clown, cast-iron clown bank

According to Box Office: IT is the highest grossing horror movie of all time. Of course, Pennywise the Clown is not exactly one’s best buddy. But we thought that if you liked the movie, you just might love our clowns in general!

Our clowns are definitely less scary and lots more fun.

Above you have Krusty the Clown from The Simpsons, a clown nightlight (1966), Roly Poly Clown – 1960 and musical, clown salt shaker, plastic cup with a clown handle, Peter Pez – a giant PEZ dispenser that holds and dispenses full PEZ packs, plastic clown figure with hoop, a sqeak toy clown, and a wonderful cast-iron mechanical bank clown.

Krusty is often portrayed as a cynical, burnt-out, addiction-riddled smoker who is made miserable by show business but continues on anyway. He has become one of the most common characters outside of the main Simpson family and has been the focus of several episodes, most of which also spotlight Bart.       From Wikipedia

In the photo below, we have another assortment of wonderful clowns. In front, the stuffed clown dolls are quiet smiley with the one on the left a collectible Knickerbocker stuffed clown. On the back shelf left to right are: 1950s tin, battery operated Violin Clown; Czechoslovakian blown glass clowns; and a 1962 Squeaky the Clown pull toy by Fisher Price. When you pull him along, the head bobs up and down and he squeaks.

Back row: L-R clown playing violin, blown glass L-R Kinckerbocker stuffed clown, 2 other stuffed clowns, Czechoslovakian blown glass clowns, Sqeaky the clown pull toy

detail of the clown on the Czech blown glass clown cornucopia

Here’s a close up detail of the clown figure that’s on two of the Czechoslovakian, blown-glass, pieces.

You guessed it. We just couldn’t resist sharing the wonderful, collectible, variety of clowns available at Bahoukas Antique Mall to help celebrate the most popular horror movie, IT, based on the book IT by Stephen King. Stop in and have some fun!

 

It’s more than just bubbles…

Soaky Bubble Bath Toys

Soaky Bubble Bath Toys - Pinocchio, Bambie and more...

They started in the 60s, but I couldn’t find a lot of information. So I thought along with the photo I would include a couple commercials that you’ll enjoy! Ah yes…. nostalgic memories 🙂

… and perfect for the coming Halloween Season is this fun video ad

Stop by soon and see what fun Soaky Toys we may have and give yourself time to browse the rest of our 2200 sq. ft store!

Stereoscopes to Virtual Reality

Stereoscopes, Viewmasters, Nintendo, X-box and More…

Many of us have seen the original stereoscope, although it might have been in a museum. But it’s effect on entertainment, education, and even culture was definite. It’s amazing to think that Underwood & Underwood was producing over 25,000 images a day for the stereoscope. (See the quote below)

stereoscope with view cards from 1880-1910, Sawyer Stereoscope Viewmaster from the 1950s, modern 3D Viewmaster

Claims that there was a stereoscope in every parlor in America came as early as the 1860s (Darrah, 2), but in their second wave of popularity in the 1880s-1910s, the availability of stereographs could be quantified: Underwood & Underwood, one of the three major stereographic companies in this period, produced over 25,000 images per day (Darrah, 47), and an estimated 300 million stereographs were issued between 1854 to 1920 (Wadja, 112). Selling at six for a dollar, most stereographs captured the interest of middle class consumers, but a few companies catered to the working class, providing similar views at 3 cents a piece or 85 cents per 100 (DeLeskie, 69). Found in drugstores, distributed through mail-order catalogs, given away as premiums by cereal and tea companies, and canvassed cross-country by college students (including a young Carl Sandburg), it is no wonder that many scholars consider the stereoscope as the first mass photographic medium prior to cinema or television (see Trachtenberg, Reading, 17).     from xroads.Virginia.edu

Imagine learning about the wonders of the world, feeling like you were there, as you viewed the scenes in a stereoscope! There was a lot of promise. But, as you know, progress moves on and photographs, movies, and television replaced these viewers. But many saw great promise in connecting humanity at the time!

IN HIS WRITINGS ABOUT the stereoscope, Oliver Wendell Holmes Sr. was what we would now call a tech-utopian. He declared that the stereoscope would become “the card of introduction to make all mankind acquaintances.”   from BostonGlobe.com

The modern day viewmaster can still be fasinating to young children, although I’m afraid they’re now learning to ‘swipe’ rather than click the change lever. Here’s a link to a great history of our modern day view-masters.

If you’re curious as to how 3D-glasses work today (and in the movies), you may want to check out THIS LINK.

Electronic and Computer Consoles/Games

Then we moved to the beginning of electronic games in the 1970s. Many will remember their first Atari or Nintendo video games. and Sega games. In the 1990s Playstation was introduced along with the original X-Box. These links are all courtesy of Wikipedia.

NOTE: If you saw our FB question, the answer to SEGA is that originally the company provided coin-operated slot machines to U.S. bases that were called “Service Games,” later becoming SEGA! Who knew?

At Bahoukas Antique Mall you’ll be able to find some of the games for the above game stations. Stop in and see if we have one you’ve been looking for.

Atari, Nintendo, Sega Genesis, Playstation and X-box games at Bahoukas Antiques in Havre de Grace, MD

Of course, if you’re a real techie, then you may want to visit the following article on CNET about Virtual Reality, 360 viewing, 3-D, augmented reality and more. ENJOY!

How Do Your Children Save Money?

Do Kids Still Use a Toy Bank to Save Coins?

cast iron mechanical banks popular in 1800s

Reproductions available at Bahoukas Antiques include the dentist by Stephens, the skeleton – not sure, the black guy is a J&E Steven and the black girl is by John Harper. Original mechanical, cast iron banks were manufactured in the 1800s and created to encourage children to save their money. These banks are frequently referred to as ‘penny banks.’

The golden age of American cast iron banks lasted from 1869 to 1910. There are two types of these banks — still and mechanical. Still banks are primarily repositories and usually take the form of an animal or human figure with a coin slot. Mechanical banks have moving parts and springs and a sequence of movements can be triggered either by simply depositing a coin or more commonly by depositing a coin and pulling a lever.   from Tribstar.com

J&E Stevens Company started in 1843 to manufacture cast-iron hardware, hammers, and a few iron toys.

A turning point in the company’s development came in 1869 with the production of their first cast-iron mechanical bank. This bank, featuring a monkey that popped out of building, inspired numerous competitors to produce similar products and helped create a new genre of product that blended art and function in ways that sparked the imagination and ingenuity of designers. In fact, between 1869 and 1890, the J & E Stevens Company produced more than 300 different models of mechanical banks.    from Connecticut History

WWI created a need for the iron to support the war efforts, essentially ending the company. But the 1920s brought renewed interest in the cast-iron mechanical banks.

Toy collecting, which became popular in the 1920s, exploded in the post-war era thanks to increases in spendable income. Today, original cast-iron banks and toys from the J & E Stevens Company sell for thousands of dollars. The enduring value of these products is a testament to the quality and ingenuity that helped make Connecticut the nation’s leading toy producer for much of the 19th century.   from Connecticut History

Here’s a quick video talking about cast iron mechanical banks from Canadian Pickers! Enjoy!

 

Along with unique cast-iron mechanical banks, we also have a wonderful selection of other banks for saving those coins. Start a great habit for your children and start them early. Stop by and browse our selection at Bahoukas Antique Mall. We’ll be watchin’ for ya!

How Do You Carry Cash?

Money Clip? Money Belt?

Money Cclip, Army Money Belt, 200 year old money leather money belt

The money clip is an optional fashion accessory for the male wearer. It keeps paper money sorted and prevents it from being rumpled-looking in the pants pocket. There is a modicum of style attached to the use of this kind of clip. After all, if you are going out for a night on the town, it would not do to pay club cover charges with badly folded and crumpled up dollar bills. It is far more impressive to pull out a wad of neatly folded cash and hand the doorman the right change in the blink of an eye.
It is fair to say that the history of the money clip is directly tied to the history of non-coin currency.   … Peter Suchy Jewelers blog 
It was interesting to learn that Invented during China’s Han Dynasty in 118 BCE, original lightweight bank notes were made of leather. (from above post)
… an early precursor to the money clip is the drafts organizer of ancient Mesopotamia. Although it would be accurate to say that this clip is more closely related in function to a paper clip, it does factor into the money clip’s history by virtue of the items it secured. Back in 323 BCE, a clip would be used to hold notes detailing the storage of grain. The clips prevented loss of papers and helped with the easy distribution of the notes. A similar clip was used in Japan until about 300 CE for notes detailing rice storage.    … Peter Suchy Jewelers blog 
Interestingly, because most money clips are metallic, they are not necessarily as good a deal for travelers today. But …
… Although rare, carbon fiber money clips are starting to see market acceptance. Using advanced moulding techniques, the high strength and durability of carbon fiber make for ideal qualities. The carbon fiber allows the clamping surfaces to open beyond parallel, without the deformation of normal metal money clips. Also, being non-metallic they are ‘scanner proof’ which allows the user to pass through metal detectors without having to remove cash and credit cards.   from Wikipedia
Many guys will recognize the U.S. Army Money Belt which makes it easier and safer to carry money, important papers, etc. Money belts are described in Wikipedia:

Money belts are belts with secret compartments often worn by tourists as a precaution against theft. One form of money belt is a belt with a pouch attached to the front which is worn under a shirt to protect valuables from thieves and/or pickpockets.

Another form appears to be an ordinary belt when worn, but contains one or more hidden pockets on the inside, often closed with a zipper. Money belts are often worn by tourists as a precaution against theft.

Items typically placed in a money belt generally include such things as a passport, travel tickets, driver’s license, credit cards, cash, and jewelry. A significant problem is that scammers, pickpockets, beggars, and the like, know that the presence of a money belt brings a high likelihood of the bearer being a tourist, and therefore a high-value target, bringing more attention upon the wearer than desirable.   from Wikipedia

The most amazing money belt in our shop at Bahoukas Antiques is this 200 years old leather belt shown in the photo. It was from around 1800-1820 and was used by the lady’s great grandfather as he traveled west in a wagon train! WOW!

As you see, we have truly unique items in our store. We look forward to your next visit!

Military Hats – WWI to present day

Do You Remember Wearing Any of These?

military hats - l to r - Kevlar, Army, Navy visor caps, WWI cap

There are those who collect military apparel. But there are those who will have stories to share when they see one of these. Which one might you be?

We have an array of military items that you might want to peruse. But here we have, left to right, a modern Kevlar helmet, an Army visor cap (middle bottom), a Navy visor cap (middle top), and a WWI helmet. Did you ever wonder how Kevlar is so strong and protective. Click on this link to learn “How Kevlar Works.”

Stop in and see this as well as many more very collectible pieces. CLICK THIS LINK to view a great 250 year history of American Army Uniforms from the Business Insider website.

Back to School Fun

Hope your first week was extraordinary!

Heading back to school creates mixed emotions. As parents we see our children growing up way too fast, especially if you’ve just sent them off to college. Our young one’s first day of school is always emotional. Don’t get me wrong, some parents are jumping up and down with glee, while others are teary-eyed and sad. But to school we must go!

collectible character lunch boxes, Dick and Jane Reader, world globe and a beautiful palette of watercolor paints are just a few of the back-to-school items available at Bahoukas Antiques.

To make school days extra special, here are just a few items available in our store that can make it a fun event. Character, collectible lunch boxes, a special Sally, Dick and Jane Reader, a world globe, or even a wonderful palette of watercolors can make returning to school a real treat.

CLICK HERE for some fun facts about the Dick and Jane Readers you might not have known.

Or CLICK HERE for some great ideas for kids to use with the watercolor palette box.

The older world globe is a great way for an older student to learn how much the countries of the world have changed. They can compare the globe to a map of the world on the internet of today!

Of course, collectible lunch boxes are just plain fun. Having a character box that your student will love to open at school lunchtime will remind him/her of how special you think they are.

What would YOU like to give your unique student? Stop by soon and see the possibilities we have waiting for the perfect owner!

70,000 BC and oil lamps are still valuable today

When the power goes out, what do YOU do?

oil - kerosene lamps for home use - one with clear globe - one in orange

The simple oil lamp has a very long history keeping humans safe, working, and comfortable.

After human race first tamed the fire and started to use it as a light source, a need appeared for a smaller, controllable flame – a more sophisticated solution, if you will. First such solution was an oil lamp some 70.000 B.C. Early humans used shells, hollow rocks or any nonflammable material as a container and in it some moss soaked in animal fat which they would ignite and it would burn with a flame.   from History of Oil Lamps

Then in Egypt, Greece, and Rome they began to make the lamps out of man-made materials: terracotta, bronze, stone and alabaster in a shape of a dish that would hold oil and a place for a wick that would prolong burning and prevented the whole surface of the oil to catch fire.

That design stayed the same until the 18th century when Aime Argand, Swiss chemist, invented and patented “Argand Lamp”. His lamp consisted of container for oil as all the other lamps but had cylindrical wick to give larger surface for a larger flame and glass tube chimney around the flame to direct the draft, make a stronger flame and make lamp safer for carrying.    from History of Oil Lamps

Here’s another great link for more details on Aime Argand, the Swiss chemist.

Then in the mid-19th century, kerosene lamps came on to the scene. We still use them today, mostly for ambiance. But, here at Bahoukas Antique Mall we also believe they have utilitarian value. If you’ve endured a nasty winter storm that kept the power off for days or a hurricane that meant battening down the hatches and surviving days without power, you know the value of a kerosene lamp to help you get through the tough times.

But the ordinary oil lamp also shared in the history of our developing country. A simple oil lamp allowed people to stay up later, to work in their barns and sheds, to read in the evening. They were used for signaling in the railroad industry and  to light highways and towns.

railroad, barn and highway oil lamps

On the left is a Pennsylvania Railroad Lantern, 1920s, by Dressel in the U.S.
The middle is a Barn Lantern by Feuerhand of Germany, 1930s.
The Highway Lantern on the right is by Dietz of the U.S., 1930s.

In the days before city lights and GPS, railroad lanterns served a very important purpose: they communicated signals at night between trains and stations. Sometimes, a timely lantern signal meant the difference between life and death. In one romanticized 19th-century story, for example, a 15-year-old girl named Kate Shelley saved the Fast Atlantic Express from a broken bridge by alerting a station agent, whose lantern signal to the train averted disaster.  from Collectors Weekly

So even today, one of our lamps might just make a power outage a bit more comfortable as you wait for your electric to come back on. Stop by today and see what we have available – lots of styles and sizes!

Long Ignored Joy of Linens

Linens Napkins, Tablecloths, Hankies and more

beautiful vintage linens available at Bahoukas

Vintage Linens are beautiful and often real artistry in their making. But, although we now use tissues instead of cloth hankies, there are some wonderful ways to use vintage linens in today’s lifestyle. Check out this blog post: 15 Cute Ways to Repurpose Vintage Linens.

Here’s a beautiful close up of the detail on some of the pieces available in our store.

detail of beautiful vintage linens

If you’re wondering how to clean vintage linens, we have two links available, PART 1 and PART 2 from Dell’s Daily Dish blog.

Stop in to Bahoukas Antique Mall and browse for the perfect vintage linens to use or to decorate with. Be sure to check out some of the awesome upcycled items created by Barbara of Green Joy!