Salt Cellars

early to mid-1900s Cut Glass & Crystal

An array of cut glass and crystal salt cellars at Bahoukas

Do you use Himalayan Salt and possibly buy it in a bulk bag? We have a wonderful selection of salt cellars to use on your table setting with your Himalayan Salt.

These pieces also make great candle holders, excess coin collectors, and even for toothpicks. What might you be able to use one or two of these beautiful, tiny dishes for?

Wondering how to tell the difference between cut glass and crystal? It can be a challenge. But CLICK HERE for a post that might help when you’re shopping your favorite antique stores. Of course, the top of your list is Bahoukas, right?

Stop by Bahoukas Antique Mall & Beer MuZeum soon. Yep, we’re always watchin’ for ya!

Easter Bunnies

Look What We Found On Our Shelves!

Families of Easter Bunnies – need a home!

Look what we discovered sitting on a shelf. These delightful Easter bunnies of assorted sizes are sure to make someone’s Holiday … well, just super special. Stop in soon and see for yourself. We’ll keep lookin’ for more hidden gems while we’re waitin’ for ya! Bahoukas Antique Mall in historic downtown Havre de Grace is ready to say, “Welcome!”

Vintage Easter

…a few beautiful items for the collector in you

vintage Easter items including vintage paper

We have a few very special vintage collectibles that you might want to add to a collection…

Easter Eggs and Little Lamps

Here we have a couple glass/porcelain eggs and lamb decorations. Collectible and so cute!

Decorative Eggs Come in all Sizes

These very collectible decorative eggs might just be the perfect addition to a very special Easter basket or a unique Easter decoration.

So come on in and see if one or two of these wonderful vintage Easter collectibles is perfect for your celebration. Yep, you know we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Super Heroes to Snoopy…

Why Do We Love Comics?

Comics encourage reading, imagination, and give us encouragement!

How many times have you looked at someone enjoying a comic book and wondering “why?” Well, according to Scribendi, there are a number of good things to come from enjoying a comic book including the one below:

#2: Comic Books Help Us Think Differently
According to University of Windsor English professor Dale Jacobs (2007), comic books require readers to create meaning using “multiple modalities.” Readers of comic books must process all the different components—visual, spatial, and textual—of what they are reading and integrate these components into one solid understanding of the story. This means that, even though comic books may appeal to readers for the same reason these individuals are drawn to other forms of entertainment, such as television and video games, reading these books actually involves much more complex processing. More research remains to be done regarding the neurological benefits of reading comic books, but it is evident that there is far more to this genre than simply “looking at pictures,” as some critics of comic books believe.

from Scribendi

I’ll bet you never thought about that. So possibly for you, or even for a young person who seems to not care about reading, maybe it’s time to start your own collection of comics. The article above has 5 great points to encourage enjoying a few comic books!

We have comics that include: Golden Age, Silver Age, Modern Age, Disney, Super Heroes, Villains, Adventure, and War. Well, those are just for starters.

By the one, did you know that this #1 Collectible Comic is SUPERMAN #1 Action Comic! Sorry, we don’t have one of those!! But we’ll help you browse our selection if you stop by and say ‘hi!’ It’s such a fine day! We’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Deviled Egg Plates

… from Roman Days to Southern Tradition

Serving deviled eggs at picnics and cocktail parties may have been de rigueur in post-World War II America, but these classic creamy concoctions did not originate in the United States. Although they weren’t prepared the same way, the roots of modern-day deviled eggs can be traced back to ancient Rome, where eggs were boiled, seasoned with spicy sauces and then typically served at the beginning of a meal—as a first course known as gustatio—for wealthy patricians.

from HISTORY.com
beautiful egg plates just in time for Easter
Just a few of our beautiful egg plates in time for Easter celebrations.

We have a nice variety of egg plates to serve those delicious deviled eggs after they’re all discovered from their hiding places on Easter Sunday. Knowing that the deviled egg goes back to Roman Days, you’ll be proud to serve this wonderful tradition on these gorgeous plates.

By the 13th century…

… stuffed eggs began to appear in Andalusia, in what is now Spain. An anonymous cookbook from this time period instructs the reader to pound boiled egg yolks with cilantro, onion juice, pepper and coriander and then beat them with murri (a sauce made of fermented barley or fish), oil and salt. After stuffing the mixture into the hollowed egg whites, the two halves were then fastened together with a small stick and peppered.


from HISTORY.com

But history is one thing. How we love deviled eggs and the beautiful plates we serve them on… well, that’s another thing!

No other Southern food, not barbecue, not fried chicken, elevates the dish upon which it is served.
But the deviled egg does.

from OurState.com

According to OurState.com – Since 2000 Fiesta Ware has introduced egg plates…

There are egg plates for anyone’s taste. They come in an Easter-egg array of colors: cobalt blue, marigold, persimmon, sunflower, plum, scarlet, tangerine. They’re made of milk, Carnival, or Depression glass. Trimmed in gold or silver. And shaped like Easter bunnies, Christmas trees, butterflies, watermelons, ladybugs, hearts, geese, wreaths, pigs, shamrocks.

from OurState.com

We invite you to stop in and see what we have in our collection. Make your deviled eggs the ‘talk of the party’ when you present your favorite deviled egg recipe on a beautiful plate. We’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Spring brings summer fabrics!

Need an iron?

Irons from this century

These irons might look familiar to you. Well, maybe to your mom and dad. Electric irons make your cotton clothes look sharp and pressed!

Although clothes made of ‘permanently pressed’ fabrics made needing an iron less necessary, there are still folks who like ‘that perfect crease.’

quite hard to date these slickers, sleekstones’, slickenstones, in german language, glättstein gniedelstein, gniddelstein, grindstein
these glass iron smoothers are believed to have served as a pressing iron. The earliest linen smoothers date from the Viking to the Middle Ages, and the latest were made in the 18th century.

from Roman Glass Makers

Do you know what this is? Is what they call a linen-smoother made from very slick stone. They were used from the days of the Vikings through the Middle Ages and into the 18th century. Who would have guessed!

The forebears to modern electric irons, these flat irons are often triangular or come to a point to make it easier to iron around buttons. The heft of a sad iron would help it hold heat, as well as to press the fabric flat. To protect fabric and surfaces from singeing, sad irons often came with metal trivets to rest on, and these are often-beautiful, intricate, and collectible examples of metalwork that were made in a myriad of designs.

The earliest metal flat irons were forged by blacksmiths in the Middle Ages. These were heated on an open fire or a stove, and the metal handles had to be grasped with a thick potholder, rag, or glove. Women had to be careful not to track soot or ash on the clothing they were ironing.

from Collectors Weekly
flat irons often filled with hot coals or heated on a coal or wood stovetop

Of course, they can be cleaned up and used as a bookend, a doorstop, or just a unique item for your decor that is most certain to be a ‘conversation piece!’

Stop in today and check these out (even if you have no intention of ironing your summer clothes)! We’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Cast Iron Banks & Figures

… always an intriguing collectible

Cast Iron Banks and Figures

Rise of the middle class…

Mechanical banks were first manufactured in the late 1800s, as the middle class emerged and grew in prosperity during the Industrial Revolution. Hence, the concept of earning and saving money became more and more important, particularly as a value to impart to children. At the same time, Victorian Era tinkerers were experimenting with mechanical technology, including spring-driven and windup devices.

The era also saw a shift in how toys were made. Originally crafted out of wood and cloth, more and more toys were fabricated out of cast-iron and mass-produced in factories, giving their adult creators a chance to express their commentaries on daily life.

fromCollectorsWeekly

At Bahoukas, we have a variety of antique and reproduction cast iron figures and banks. Stop in to see us and add one to your collection. Absolutely, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Fountain Pens and Nibs

Do you love the feel of a fountain pen?

Beautiful collectible and vintage fountain pens…

After centuries of writing with quills dipped in ink, people in the 1800s began embracing fountain pens with internal ink reservoirs that were filled with eyedroppers. Almost until the end of the century, fountain pens were notoriously fickle devices. They routinely leaked and the flow of ink onto the writing surface was uneven.

from Collectors Weekly
Fountain pens and nibs – collectible

Is there a perfect pen?

Fountain pens have always served as the quintessential combination of beauty, tradition, and dexterity. But did you know they’re also tools of environmental consciousness? Join our tour of the fountain pen’s history, infinite varieties, and remarkable powers. With tips for shopping and maintenance.
By TIM REDMOND

from Craftsmanship.net

Thirty-two years ago, when I was a young writer struggling to pay the rent and eat, I walked into an art supply store in San Francisco and put down $120 for a pen.

My friends thought I was nuts: that was, literally, half a month’s rent, a month’s groceries. A pack of ten ballpoint pens went for a buck; what on Earth was I thinking?

from Craftsmanship.net

Collecting fountain pens has its own vocabulary, just like any other collectible. CLICK HERE for the basics of fountain pens.

Fountain Pen Nibs

A fountain pen nib is the metal writing point at the end of the writing instrument. Virtually all quality fountain pens use solid gold nibs, both for their durability and for the smoothness of the writing experience they provide. Cheaper steel and gold-plated nibs, on the other hand, have a tendency to deteriorate and are harder to customize or repair, whereas a solid gold nib can last a lifetime (and more).

from Nibs.com

Like all wonderful things, there is a great deal to learn. If we whet your appetite, then stop by and see what we have. We’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Collectible Cars and More

Pressed Steel, Die-Cast, Matchbox, Hot Wheels, and Dinky

Old metal cars – pressed steel and die-cast (some plastic)

We have a wide variety of collectible cars, trucks, and more. Above is a wonderful collection of pressed steel and die-cast cars and trucks – with a few wood and plastic as well.

MatchBox cars and more…

Is there anyone who didn’t have their own collection of MatchBox cars? Is there someone in your life who may want to actually start their own collection. We have an interesting varietly of collectibles including MatchBox, Hot Wheels and Dinky to name a few.

MatchBox cars and so many others. What a wonderful way to start a collection.

It’s to be a bit rainy today. Drop by and see for yourself what we have in the store. Maybe you’ll want to purchase a couple to add to that youngster’s Easter Basket!!! Just an idea!

We’ll be watchin’ for ya. So come on in!

First Day of Spring 2019

and Wednesday Charms!!!

Who do you know that would love a ‘charm’!!!

“A Prize in Every Box”


The most famous use of prizes in the United States (and the word “prize” in this context) is Cracker Jack brand popcorn confection. Prizes have been inserted into every package of Cracker Jack continuously since 1912. A familiar jingle to people who watched television in the United States in the 1960s and ’70s goes “Candy-coated popcorn, peanuts and a prize. That’s what you get with Cracker Jack!” Cracker Jack sales are not what they used to be, with much more competition in the snack industry and less creative prizes. The most valuable prizes found in Cracker Jack are the baseball cards distributed in 1914 and 1915. Although most of the prizes recently are just printed paper, in 2004, a complete set of 1914 Cracker Jack baseball cards — including the highly sought after “Shoeless” Joe Jackson and Ty Cobb cards — was sold for a record $800,000.

from Wikipedia

Prizes in boxes, gum, cereals, machines – well, just about anything someone can tuck a tiny prize into – are always fun. Stop by and see our Wednesday Box Surprise – a huge case of charms.

Let us know how you use these tiny charms: jewelry, art, shadow boxes? Yep, we’ll be watchin’ for ya. After all, it’s the first day of Spring 2019!!

Vintage Medical

40s & 50s old advertising

Medical Vintage items at Bahoukas

We had a wonderful assortment of vintage medical/advertising items – many from the 1940s-1950s – brought into the store a few months ago. Stop by and check it out if you’re a vintage medical collector.

Vintage medical hygiene and creams

From Sloan’s Liniments to foot powders, tonics to tooth powder, cough medicines to thermometers. This is a beautiful variety of 40s-50s vintage medical pieces and advertising. Stop and talk with George soon. Browse and see what you might like to add to your collection.

Vintage medical collectibles

Vaseline creams, tinctures, and Watkins products are just a few of these 1940s-1950s medical collectibles. It’s an amazing assortment if you’re collections include vintage medical items.

Yep, we’re here. We’re believing in Spring. And we’re waiting for you. We’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Edison’s Genius

Edison’s Gramophone 1912-1914

Beautiful Edison Gramophone 1912-1914

Bahoukas Antique Mall has a beautiful 1912-1914 Edison Gramophone with a selection of wax cylinders. It’s a beautiful piece. Edison had a wonderful view of the many uses that would benefit society that included dictation, recorded books for the blind, music boxes, and others.

Another view of the beautiful Edison Gramophone available at Bahoukas.

One use was to have music available for soldiers, that gave them a taste of home through familiar music. Though not considered by Edison, he welcomed the opportunity to acknowledge the sacrifice of American and Allied Nation’s soldiers in WWI. You can listen to Edison here:

Edison speaking public on a phonograph – 1917

Edison Invents the Phonograph 

Many of the uses Edison suggested for the phonograph have become a reality, but there were others he hadn’t imagined. For example, the phonograph allowed soldiers to take music off to war with them. In 1917, when the U.S. became involved in World War I, the Edison Company created a special model of the phonograph for the U.S. Army. This basic machine sold for $60. Many Army units purchased these phonographs because it meant a lot to the soldiers to have music to cheer them and remind them of home. This is an audio clip of Edison himself in which he expresses his pride in the soldiers and reminds Americans of the enormous sacrifice and contribution made by the other allied nations. 

from AmericasLibrary.com

Stop in soon and see this beautiful Edison Gramophone. We have others as well as newer model phonographs/record players. You do know the records are coming back – right? Well, we’ll be watchin’ for you!

Ribbons and Tuning

It’s a Wednesday Surprise

typewriter ribbons, pitch master tuning, and more in Bahoukas's Wednesday Surprise.
Typewriter ribbons, an old Pitch Master Tuning

They’re not in a Surprise Box, but it is an interesting shelf. Among the items are old typewriter ribbons and a Pitch Master Tuner. Below is a quote from an article that talks about the movie from 2012 titled “Pitch Perfect.” Yes, there are 3 movies altogether.

Pitch pipes are pitchy. Like, I don’t even know why we use pitch pipes anymore. They sound like dying cats. But we keep using them because they are classic, and at the end of the day everything about a cappella has its roots in the old school, bougie, landed gentry with matching blazers, etc.

from ThoughtCatalog.com

Do you remember being in the chorus and having someone use the tuner to get everyone on pitch and ready to sing?

Below is a unique use of the Pitch Pipe as a sound healing tool to tone the instrument of your body, mind, and spirit.

As you see, we learn a lot of things working at Bahoukas Antique Mall. We love sharing it, too. So yep, we’ll be watchin’ for ya. Come on in and pay us a visit.

Cast Iron Door Knockers

and their interesting history

… the history of door knockers begins several thousand years ago in Ancient Greece.

Greeks were a bit picky about unannounced visits to their dwellings, and it was considered a breach of etiquette to enter without warning.


Where Spartans would simply shout their arrival, the more sophisticated Athenians preferred to use a door knocker.

from Five Minute History

Doors had replaced hangings to provide better safety and privacy, and upper-class Greeks had slaves whose sole purpose was to answer the door.


It’s a bit like having a butler, but one that was chained to the door to prevent them wandering off. If they didn’t die of boredom, they’d fall asleep, and so to wake them up, visitors rapped the door with a short bar of iron attached to a chain.


from Five Minute History

It wasn’t long before some Greeks realized the short bar made a good weapon with which to attack the householder. So property owners fought back with new technology.


The knocker evolved into a heavy ring fastened to the door by a plate—dual purpose knocker and handle!


from Five Minute History


One of the most enduring themes for knockers has been the lion’s head.
Traditionally regarded as the king of beasts, the lion’s head symbolizes bravery, nobility, strength, and valor.


Lion’s head knockers were popular in the American colonies up until the revolution when the Eagle took precedence.


from Five Minute History

So we encourage you to visit Bahoukas and take a peek at these wonderful cast iron door knockers.

They’re really fun and will most certainly have your guests stop and enjoy! Yep, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

INSULATORS

… a really fun collectible

insulators - a fun collectible - can be found at Bahoukas
A selection of porcelain insulators at Bahoukas

Glass insulators come in hundreds of distinct styles, shapes and sizes; and hundreds of different colors (in all colors of the rainbow)! What could be prettier than a glass “rainbow” in your kitchen window – with each different color glowing as the sun shines in? Insulators have also been made in porcelain, wood, rubber, plastic, and iron.

When you add to this the amount of different embossings, base types (with or without drip points, different styles of drip points, etc.) there are literally thousands of different insulators available.

If you don’t like large collectibles, you can go as small as 2 inches. If you perfer BIG, many insulators are available in sizes over a foot across and a foot tall.

from Rainbow Riders Trading Post
A part of the many insulators available at Bahoukas
Glass Insulators at Bahoukas

Many started the collections to put on a window sill to catch the sunlight. Then like many behaviors, the collection grew and soon becomes … well … a bit larger than you ever expected.

Insulators at Bahoukas, let us help you start your collection
Another variety of insulators

Some insulators date back to 1844, with the inception of the telegraph. (They were used to hold wires off the ground.) They are real pieces of history that you can hold in your hand and put on a shelf.

Some porcelain insulators are still being made (although most cities are putting most of the power and telephone lines underground without insulators), but production of glass insulators ceased in 1969.

Insulators have made it through wars (including the Civil War), being buried for years, or just being unnoticed for 100 years or more in a remote area. Many have survived the gunshots from cowboys of old and little boys of late; and many wooden insulators were not destroyed in the San Francisco earthquake and fire.


The early telegraph lines paralleled the transcontinental railroad, and insulators became an integral part of railroad safety.


from Rainbow Riders Trading Post

If you’re curious and want to know a wee bit more before starting your collection, this video below will definitely help.

When you’re ready to get started, or you want to add an insulator or two to your collection, stop in and see what we have. Yes sir (or m’am), we’ll be waitin’ for ya!

Hardee’s Fun

…check out this character sign

Large 4×4 Hardee’s characters sign

The animated characters in the TV commercials for children will include something old (Speedy McGreedy and Gilbert Giddyup, who have been used in Hardee’s advertising previously and something new (Frankenstein Mouth and Supermouth).

“Through characters like these, we want to generate the idea that there is no better way in the world to satisfy your appetite than by going to Hardee’s,” said Thomas W. Carey, a senior vice president and management supervisor of Benton & Bowles.

from NYTIMES.com
1970s Hardee’s Cartoon Commercial

Wilber Hardee opened his first namesake restaurant in Greenville, North Carolina in 1960. Five months later he had his first franchisee and over the years his burger chain has spread to become a favorite throughout the Midwestern and Southeastern United States.

from Hardees.com

Fifteen years later they celebrated the opening of their 1,000th restaurant. In the 80s with a little help from the California Raisins, they introduced their Cinnamon and Raisin Biscuits. By the end of the 80s, they’d opened their 2,000th location. Today, among other items, they are known for their Thickburgers(R) line.

If you’re looking for something fun and you happen to be a Hardee’s Fan, stop and check this out! Yep, we’re here and we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Chalkware…

What is chalkware?

Beautiful wall pieces of ‘chalkware’

Chalkware is an American term for popular figurines either made of moulded plaster of Paris (usually) or sculpted gypsum, and painted, typically with oils or watercolors. They were primarily created during one of three periods: from the late 18th century to the beginning of the 20th century, during the Great Depression, and during the ‘mid-century modern’ era as decorative lamps, figurines and wall decor from the 1940s-1960s. 

from WIKIPEDIA

These figurines were often hand-painted, sometimes glazed. When Carnival chalkware was popular in the 30s through 50s, it could be hand-painted or sometimes air-brushed. Below is an excerpt from a great article in ANTIQUE WEEK:

Condition of carnival chalkware, like other collecting categories, does affect price, but thankfully not all that much. The nature of chalkware lends itself to being easily chipped. That’s understood. The coloration is also known to fade mainly because these items were rarely glazed. Carnival chalkware might have worn a coat of beeswax or varnish for protection, but often their porous surface was left as is straight out of the mold with only paint as its finish.


Speaking of paint, the earliest carnival chalkware were usually painted by hand, so looking at the quality of the paint job helps collectors get a feel for when it was made.


Starting in the 1920s, many pieces were air-brushed to speed up the process and because of this, details, especially facial details, suffered. To hurry along production even more and cut down on the cost of hiring air-brush artists, stencils were later employed with details becoming even more generic.


Another indicator of age is the amount of paint on a piece; especially human figures like the Kewpie Doll, Sailor or Cowboy. If both the front and back of the figure is painted, it was probably made in the 1940s.
Additions on the figure can also be an indicator. Glitter is often found on pieces made after 1930. Other additions can include feathers or even a wooden “cigarette.” Many animals made between 1935 and 1950 have glass eyes.

What prizes did you win from the days of going to the carnival in early to mid-1900s? The history of chalkware is fascinating.

Stop in and see us soon. Check out our selection. And yes, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Toy Kitchens

… instructional and great marketing

At Bahoukas Antique Mall & Beer MuZeum we have a wonderful variety of toy sets to play house, buy groceries, cook and bake in the kitchen, and more.

The following describes a bit of ‘toy history.’

Kid-size pots and pans - great collectibles for the youngsters in your life! Bahoukas in Havre de Grace
A great selection of kids’ pots, pans, coffee pots and more!

toy is an item that is used in play, especially one designed for such use. Playing with toys can be an enjoyable means of training young children for life in society. Different materials like wood, clay, paper, and plastic are used to make toys. Many items are designed to serve as toys, but goods produced for other purposes can also be used. For instance, a small child may fold an ordinary piece of paper into an airplane shape and “fly it”. Newer forms of toys include interactive digital entertainment. Some toys are produced primarily as collectors’ items and are intended for display only.

The origin of toys is prehistoric; dolls representing infants, animals, and soldiers, as well as representations of tools used by adults are readily found at archaeological sites. The origin of the word “toy” is unknown, but it is believed that it was first used in the 14th century. Toys are mainly made for children. The oldest known doll toy is thought to be 4,000 years old.

Playing with toys is considered to be important when it comes to growing up and learning about the world around us. Younger children use toys to discover their identity, help their bodies grow strong, learn cause and effect, explore relationships, and practice skills they will need as adults

from WIKIPEDIA
kid-size kitchen accessories - Bahoukas Antiques
Kitchen accessories, baking tins, hand mixers, rolling pins and more – sized perfectly for kids!

Besides perfect toys for kids, it didn’t take long for marketers to realize the value of making kid-size representatives of their ‘brands.’ Who didn’t want a refrigerator “Just like mom’s.”

The following is a perfect example of this new marketing tactic that quickly built a huge toy market from the 1950s forward. (photo courtesy of Smithsonian Nat’l Museum of American History and Sears)

Pop into Bahoukas and see what fun items might be perfect for one of your youngsters. We really do have some great items. And yes, we’re watchin’ for ya!