Very Collectible Wedding Toppers

Beautiful and humorous!

fun and funny collectible wedding toppers at Bahoukas in Havre de Grace

Brides, wedding planners, and wedding shower hosts are always looking for unique decorations. At Bahoukas Antique Mall we have some beautiful, and a few humorous, collectible wedding toppers. They make great toppers for wedding cakes, of course. But they can also be used in wedding shower decor! 

Wondering what other ways you might use collectible wedding toppers. VISIT THIS PAGE on HGTV.com for some really fun ideas. ENJOY … then stop by and see if we have something that might work for your creative project. Yes, we WILL be watchin’ for ya!

The Telegraph – replaced the Semaphore

FIRST – the SEMAPHORE

Developed in the early 1790s, the semaphore consisted of a series of hilltop stations that each had large movable arms to signal letters and numbers and two telescopes with which to see the other stations. Like ancient smoke signals, the semaphore was susceptible to weather and other factors that hindered visibility. A different method of transmitting information was needed to make regular and reliable long-distance communication workable.
from History.com

Here is a U.S. Navy training video for using flags to signal:


 

Can you imagine communicating hilltop to hilltop?

It’s hard for us to picture such a life today, especially when having our phones unavailable for 15 minutes has us acting like we’re lost! Enter the telegraph machine – the beginning of the more reliable and more easily accessible communications. 

telegraph machine - see it at Bahoukas Antique Mall in Havre de Grace

 

In 1843, Morse and Vail received funding from the U.S. Congress to set up and test their telegraph system between Washington, D.C., and Baltimore, Maryland. On May 24, 1844, Morse sent Vail the historic first message: “What hath God wrought!” The telegraph system subsequently spread across America and the world, aided by further innovations. 

The electric telegraph transformed how wars were fought and won and how journalists and newspapers conducted business. Rather than taking weeks to be delivered by horse-and-carriage mail carts, pieces of news could be exchanged between telegraph stations almost instantly. The telegraph also had a profound economic effect, allowing money to be “wired” across great distances.

Did you know? SOS, the internationally recognized distress signal, does not stand for any particular words. Instead, the letters were chosen because they are easy to transmit in Morse code: “S” is three dots, and “O” is three dashes.

from History.com

From this invention, communication changed rapidly moving on to the telephone, fax machine, and now the internet. 

Here’s an intriguing explanation of using the Morse Code on a telegraph machine. The descriptive images are as interesting as the lesson! Enjoy!

Stop in and see this fascinating piece of our recent history. We’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Tools and Instruments

What’s YOUR Interest?

A simple machine is a mechanical device that changes the direction or magnitude of a force. In general, they are the simplest mechanisms that use mechanical advantage (also called leverage) to multiply force. The six classical simple machines which were defined by Renaissance scientists are:

Lever
Wheel and axle
Pulley
Inclined plane
Wedge
Screw

from Wikipedia

The simple machine was the beginning. We could take a simple machine and multiply our efforts. Then …

Substitution as makeshift is when human ingenuity comes into play and a tool is used for its unintended purpose such as a mechanic using a long screw driver to separate a cars control arm from a ball joint instead of using a tuning fork. In many cases, the designed secondary functions of tools are not widely known. As an example of the former, many wood-cutting hand saws integrate a carpenter’s square by incorporating a specially shaped handle that allows 90° and 45° angles to be marked by aligning the appropriate part of the handle with an edge and scribing along the back edge of the saw. The latter is illustrated by the saying “All tools can be used as hammers.” Nearly all tools can be used to function as a hammer, even though very few tools are intentionally designed for it and even fewer work as well as the original.

from Wikipedia

Here, at Bahoukas Antique Mall, we have a variety of tools for nearly every need. We have a wonderful assortment of vintage tools used for woodworking. But check these out for a different peek at what you might find on a shelf :

Collectible microscope at Bahoukas Antique Mall in Havre de Grace, MD  Comptometer - Bahoukas Antique Mall in Havre de Grace  Vintage blood pressure cuff at Bahoukas in Havre de Grace, MD 

On the left is a beautiful microscope that just might delight a young person learning a bit of science! In the center, well, this is quite the calculator. What we can do on our smartphones is so much more than the efforts made with the Comptometer! Here’s a great video explain the mechanics behind the Comptometer. You can see how the ‘simple machines’ noted above make up the way these machines worked.

 

Do you wonder how you use them? Here’s another video. You can advance to around 3 minutes to see how to use it. 

 And finally, we have an old version of a tool/instrument to read your blood pressure. It’s intriguing to see wrist cuffs now that do the same. 

Keep in mind, that tools started with the simplest machines noted above. Later, when you added steam, electricity, transistors, all leading to the computer age and the use of chips. Tools and instruments are fascinating. If you’re an older person, you’ll remember many of these transitions. If you’re a younger person, it might be fun to understand the development required to have the amazing tools you use today!

Hey, stop in and visit us at Bahoukas Antique Mall and Beer MuZeum. We love chatting. And yes, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Do you remember Buffalo Bob?

Howdy Doody and other puppets!

Puppets at Bahoukas in Havre de Grace include Howdy Doody, cloth hand puppet with plastic clown face, lady hand puppet, plastic frog hand puppet, and goat and fox push puppets

Howdy Doody was an American children’s television program (with circus and Western frontier themes) that was created and produced by E. Roger Muir and telecast on the NBC network in the United States from December 27, 1947, until September 24, 1960. It was a pioneer in children’s television programming and set the pattern for many similar shows. One of the first television series produced at NBC in Rockefeller Center, in Studio 3A, it was also a pioneer in early color production as NBC (at the time owned by TV maker RCA) used the show in part to sell color television sets in the 1950s.

from Wikipedia

Remember this – here’s a show from 1947 from YouTube!

 

Click on the Wikipedia link for the history of the Howdy Doody Show. It’s most interesting. Also, we share a few photos from the show (also from Wikipedia ). Do you remember these characters? Did you  have a favorite?

Buffalo Bob with Howdy Doody and Flub-a-Dub  Phileas T Bluster from the Howdy Doody Show  Clarabell the Clown from the Howdy Doody Show

The other items in the top photo, available at Bahoukas Antique Mall in Havre de Grace include, a 1950s Howdy Doody puppet, on the left  is a 1960s cloth hand puppet with a plastic clown face, goat and fox “push puppets”, a 1970s lady hand puppet and int the front right is a plastic frog hand puppet from the 1970s. 

BRIEF HISTORY OF PUSH PUPPETS…

….where did they come from ? When were they first made? All Puppets in photos are from my own collection. Push puppets were first made in Switzerland by a wooden toy maker, Walter Kourt Walss in 1932. These articulated,wobbling toys were known as WAKOUWAS; taken from the first few letters of each of Walter’s names! The dancing, wiggling toys are now known by many different names around the world   from Pomsie’s Push Puppets
Take a peek at the Pomsie site … you’ll even see a Howdy Doody push puppet!
 

 

Payphone? Dashboard Clock?

More tools and instruments of yesteryear!

magnetic dashboard clock 1950s-1960s

In our last post, we shared a1994 car phone. Today we wanted to show you a 1950s-1060s magnetic dashboard clock. WOW … and now we’re all digital! Did you have a dashboard clock?

Do you remember Pay Phones!

 

We also wanted to share an older pay phone. Golly, I remember that if you passed a pay phone, you immediately walked up and hoped someone had left their change. Now many youngsters wouldn’t even know how to use them. 

Stop in and pay us a visit. We welcome you to stroll our very own “Nostalgia Lane.” You might just find the perfect collectible for your home decor or collection. And yes, of course, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Hello? Hello?

Early Car Phones

Motorola Dynasty Car-to-Car phone at Bahoukas

We have one of these ‘amazing’ early cell phones in our shop. The instructions are very long AND the battery charging… well, let’s just say that complaints today have nothing over these 1990s phones. We’ve included an instructional video just so you can appreciate what you have today!

 

from wikipedia: Don Adams with Shoe Phone from Get Smart tv show.

While checking this out, for some strange reason the show “Get Smart” came to mind and his ‘shoe phone.’ Do you remember that? No, we don’t have one of those. 
The photo is from Wikipedia. Don’t you just love what the internet can remember!

Stop in today and see what other crazy, intriguing, interesting, collectibles we have. Remember, we have the ‘Collection of Collections.” And yes, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Like the small things?

Collecting Miniatures has several advantages.

miniature collections 1

When you collect miniatures, they’ll take less space. For the minimalist, it might be the perfect way to enjoy vintage and antique collectibles in a smaller or simpler space. 

Miniature Collectibles 2

How long have we been collecting miniatures? Consider this quote:

Archeologists have discovered wooden miniatures of farm animals, carts and other everyday objects that date back to at least 5,000 BC in Egypt. It’s difficult to catalog the exact history of miniature collecting since there are so many different types of miniatures and ways the miniatures were used.

While people have collected miniatures for thousands of years, most early miniatures served a utilitarian purpose. Armies used miniature models for battlefield and wartime strategies. Architects and designers used miniature models to help visualize and refine designs for structures and furniture. Regardless of the purpose or type, it’s safe to say that people have been interested in miniature collecting for as long as miniatures have been around.

from Hobby Helper 

Miniatures and Czech glass

Above is a beautiful collection of miniatures including Czech glass – tiny, exquisite, and beautiful.

miniatures - Princess House lead crystal sets

The above collection are lead crystal sets by Princess House. They include fish, horse, cow, rabbit and rat plus four circus figurines: clown, lion, elephant and seal.

So if you would like to start collecting, but also want to keep it manageable, start with ‘miniatures.’ Of course, we’re not saying that miniature collections can’t take over your space. But, that’s for another post! 

Stop in and see the miniatures we have throughout the shop. We have also have a number of printers trays that are great for small collections. Of course, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

One More Back-to-School Post

vintage 1940s oak school desk chairLinking the Old with the New

This vintage 1940s oak school desk-chair is probably still remembered by your grandparents, and maybe, your parents. Not particularly comfortable, but they sure did stand the test of time. 

I’m wondering, did they have left-handed ones? Anybody know? Hmmm….

Check out the air-conditioned seat!!! And there was a shelf below to store books you weren’t using. 

 

 

Speaking of books, take a peek at these. They include a 1959 Dick and Jane series titled, “Come With Us.” The New A B C Book” is a motivated Silent Reader and Workbook from 1932! Plus a 1962 “Sally Dick and Jane”  from the New Basic Readers. We’ve noticed that many homeschool teachers/parents stop in looking for these and the old classics of children’s books.

Collectible readers including Dick and Jane

And we’ve added a variety of ‘school accessories.’ Of course, we recognize the stapler and tape dispenser. The Boston Pencil Sharpener Model L is from 1939! More recent Elmers Glue items sit next to an old bottle of Le Page’s Grip Spreader Mucilage. Le Page has been in business for well over 130 years. Here’s a quote from their website:

Our company’s story begins in 1879, when William Nelson LePage invented an industrial glue that was strong, ready-to-use and had a long shelf life. Shortly after, LePage developed a consumer version and expanded his line into other products, including mucilage, an adhesive that’s still widely used today.

School Acessories including Boston Pencil Sharpener, stapler, tape dispenser, LePage's grip spreader mucilage (glue)

Stop by today, whether you’re looking for something special or just want to browse “Nostalgia Lane.” Yep, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

School Starts!

Some have started – others will start next week!

We walked around the shop this week to find school-related items. We have a couple of fun posts for you.

watercolor paint set - lid

Just the tin (top photo) that these watercolors are in is beautiful. Below you’ll see the actual watercolors and most are still complete. What a fun way to say, “Happy Back to School!”

inside watercolor paint set

Below is a group of very unique school collectibles.

Balckboard to Books - Calkins's Reading Cards 1883, slateboard 1920s, Creative Playthings Recorder 1970s

On the right is an individual slate board from the 1920s-1930s. In front is a plastic recorder from Creative Playthings (R) from the 1970s. On the left is an 1883 vintage item: From Blackboard to Books – Calkins’s Reading Cards. There’s a sample reading card in the middle.

Going back to school may have a bit of trepidation to the youngest, while some returning students look forward to it and others feel like it’s a punishment to be endured. But no matter, we send best wishes for a successful year to each and every student!

Drop by Bahoukas Antique Mall and check these items and more. Yes, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

World’s Fair Memorabilia

The First Was in New York 1853-54

World's Fair Memorabilia at Bahoukas in Havre de Grace

We have a few wonderful collectibles from World Fairs of yesteryear.  The above photo includes the following:

FRONT (l-r): 1939 World’s Fair Triathlon Salt & Pepper (New York) – this piece is truly unique. Made of the Fair’s Trylon & Perisphere. You pick up the entire piece, shake from one side and you’ll have salt; shake from the other side and you’ll have pepper. Next is the item from Century of Progress – American Bible Society Pamphlets. From the 1939-1940 International Expo are 100 Movie Views & Pathegram (viewer) from the Golden Gate/San Francisco Bay. Finally the 1965-65 New York World’s Fair Children’s Card Game.

BACK (l-r): Postcard from the 1939 World’s Fair “Car of Tomorrow” – a Crosley. It includes “My Feet are NO longer tired after what I’ve seen at the Crosley Building.” Next is a 1939 New York World’s Fair Vinegar Bottle. Next to that is a 1962 glass from the Seattle World’s Fair. And finally a unique bank from the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair.

From what we’ve been able to learn from America’s Best History website, there were 30 World’s Fairs in the U.S. between 1853 and 1984 offering a wide array of exhibits and activities that generally included a ‘look at the future.’ This site has abundant information from each of the World’s Fairs. Click on a postcard and learn more. Then pop into Bahoukas Antique Mall and Beer MuZeum to check out these wonderful collectibles. Yep, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

 

A Nickel’s Just 5 Cents – Right?

Maybe – You’ll have to ask a numismatic!

collectible coins for numismatics at Bahoukas Antique Mall

In the photo above (left to right): 1923 Peace Dollar, 1971 Eisenhower Dollar, 1915-S Barber half-dollar, 1964 Kennedy half-dollar, 1929-D Mercury dime, 1835 large cent, and 1861 Indian Head penny.

If you’re a coin collector, ie numismatic, the right nickel could be worth in the $100,000 range. Of course, you’ll probably not find one in your pocket! Click here to read the story of 15 of the most valuable nickels. One was actually sold for over $3 million! Alrighty now!

Start your coin collection at Bahoukas Antique Mall in Havre de Grace

In this photo, we have a Collector Book for Buffalo Head Nickles (use these albums to keep your coins). There is also a 1934 – $10 silver certificate and a 1957 – $1 silver certificate. In front on the left is a 1980 Proof Set, then 1 1969 Mint Set and a 2008-D Uncirculated Coin Set.

Want to learn the difference between Proof sets, Mint Sets, and Uncirculated Sets? Click here for a great site for beginner collectors.

Does that help explain the intrigue of coin collecting? Maybe the following article will help if you’re thinking about it and haven’t started yet. It’s from  U.S. Mint website:

Why Collect Coins?

Group of children holding up Frederick Douglass National Historic Site quarters.Coins in your pocket, coins at the store, coins under couch cushions, there’s always more! It seems like coins are everywhere. Why in the world would anyone collect them?

There are plenty of reasons to collect coins! Here are some of them:

  • Coins can be souvenirs—both of the event and of how you got the coins.
  • Coins come in many designs and metals.
  • The way they’re made has changed over the years.
  • They’re often just plain beautiful to look at.

Whether you have a lot of money to spend on coin collecting or none at all, it’s an interesting hobby for everyone. Here are some other reasons to collect coins:

  • To learn about history.
  • To learn about other countries and cultures.
  • To enjoy the way coins capture moments of history, time, and people’s lives.
  • Because of an interest in coin design themes such as art, science, or animals.
  • For the joy of learning about the coins themselves.
  • To display and share with others.
  • For the challenge of completing a collection.
  • To enjoy belonging to a coin club or meeting fellow collectors from around the world.
  • For the excitement of finding rare coins in your pockets!

Numismatics is the study and collecting of things that are used as money, including coins, tokens, paper bills, and medals. A person who collects coins is called a numismatist.

Interested in collecting coins or want to meet your fellow numismatists? Visit the American Numismatic Association website to learn more.

When you’re ready to get started, stop by and visit. We’ll help. And yes, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Collecting Fishing Reels

Do you know your reels?

1940s-1960s collectible fishing reels

Included in this photo are left to right: Penn Reel 1940s-50s, Zebco 1960s, Martin Fly Fishing Reel 1960s, and a JC Higgins Open Face Reel from the 1950s. 

While working on this particular blog post, we had to do a little research. We found this very interesting article on boatmags.com that will intrigue the novice and probably start a lot of debate among collectors and fishermen/women.  

Wikipedia relates an interesting development of the fishing reel and states that in 1651, English literature first reported a “wind” installed within two feet of the lower end of the rod. This is usually accepted as the earliest known written reference to a reel. However, there are examples of Oriental paintings that depict Chinese fishermen using reels of various sizes that date to the twelfth century.

Until the 1800’s the reel was used primarily as a storage device for excess line. However, in the 19th century there was a rapid development of the multiplying reel, which allowed reels to evolve into casting devices. Although multiplying reels were probably invented in Great Britain, the reels of George Snyder, of Paris, Kentucky, have become the most famous 19th century multipliers.

Did you realize that there was a “wind” or reel as early as the 12th century?

We certainly didn’t. But it seems they’ve been depicted in Oriental paintings. Fascinating!

The credit for the first multiplying reel in the U.S. goes to a Kentucky man. Sadly, not having patented or trademarked it, it was soon copied by others. The following quote is from Kentucky Monthly:

Snyder was born in or about 1780 in Pennsylvania and moved to Kentucky around 1803, settling in Paris. He was a watchmaker and silversmith, and also an avid and apparently skilled fisherman who is credited with building the first multiplying reel in the United States. Snyder owned, or had at least seen, a British-made 1-to-1 level wind reel and likely developed his multiplying design from this simple tool.

So, yes, we encourage you to stop in and browse our shop. Whether you’re looking for a reel or any other item from our “Collection of Collections,”, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Black Memorabilia

or Black Americana

Black Memorabilia at Bahoukas Antique Mall in Havre de Grace

The above photo is an example of some of the vintage collectibles of Black Americana available in our shop. In front, it includes a syrup and shaker set, bobble-head, and salt & pepper shakers. In back are Little Black Sambo books, postcards, and a biscuit jar. We have a variety of other pieces. 

Over the years we’ve had a number of collectors inquire about our various pieces. We believe that, while offensive to some, they are important in remembering and understanding our history. Only then can we learn and grow beyond those times. Below is one of several articles regarding this very issue of why people collect Black Memorabilia. This one is from PBS. 

In response to this fascinating rhetorical question — “[Since] some items are disturbing, offensive and hard to believe, [if you collect and display them] are you creating these images yourself?” — her pamphlet answers: “No, definitely not,” since the store “contains astounding mementos reflecting true lives of people of African descent,” including all that African Americans have suffered through visual media, “depictions [that] are a testimony of life in the past,” including “the ‘good, bad, and ugly.’ ” And in response to whether “these politically incorrect depictions” are, in fact, “teaching racism,” the pamphlet answers that “displaying memorabilia as part of a home, no matter how painful it may seem, is ensuring that ‘each one teach one’ and that history must not repeat itself.” Our children, it continues, “must know where we have been to know where we are going.” In other words, the most important function of displaying and collecting this stuff is a didactic one: critique. And there is a lot here to critique.  from PBS article by Henry Louis Gates, Jr. The quote is in from an African-American woman, Gail Deculus-Johnson, who owned Sable Images Shop in Los Angeles.

Or put another way, this quote is from a blog post by Pamela Wiggins in The Spruce Crafts page from 11/18/2017:

Others have a completely opposite reaction. They want to own all types of Black Americana because those items were a reflection of their cultural heritage. A collection reflecting both difficulties and triumphs embrace important aspects of lineage and interest in our nation’s history. It’s reported that Oprah Winfrey is among the celebrity collectors interested in black memorabilia, so other collectors are in good company.
 
Collecting takes a different turn in these terms. It’s not just a matter of fun, frivolity, and amassing things to fill a home. It becomes a personal endeavor to make peace with the past and ensure a prosperous future free of racial barriers.

If you collect Black Memorabilia, we welcome you to come and browse our collection. Yep, we’ll be watchin’ for ya.

Rocking, Springy. Bouncy Toy Horses

Everyone Had a Horse!


French rocking horse from early 1900s at Bahoukas Antique Mall.
What was your favorite toy horse?

It took three times around the shop to actually find all the ‘play horses!’ And we’re not even talking about the horse figurines, which we’ve posted in the past. These amazing rocking/springy/bouncy children’s horses come in all shapes and sizes. But don’t stop there. 

We also have several wooden horses including this Fench Rocking Horse from the early 1900s. It’s not in the best of shape, but someone out there could create a beautiful upcycled pieced, we’re certain.

The other fun ‘horse-y’ items are the 1940s stuffed horse and jockey. These are just too cute. 

You might notice in our slideshow two unique pieces. One is a stick horse which requires actually walking/running around pretending you’re riding a real horse. Hey, exercise that’s fun! The other is a huge wagon wheel. Why? I don’t know, just seemed to fit with horses. One is all metal; the other is wood with a flat metal tire. These are large wagon wheels at least 3 feet in diameter. Can you come up with a unique upcycle?

Stop in and think creatively. Whether you purchase one for your bouncing, active little one or you upcycle it in some way, we have a nice selection to choose from. Stop by and share your stories of playing on your bouncy, springy, rocking horse. Yessireeee… we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Implements and Tools

Unique and Interesting

The variety of implements and tools are wide and varied in our antique mall. The above slides include a spinning wheel, butter churn from the early 1800s, coffee grinder, kerosene heater, minnow basket, a wheel from an assembly line belt from FW Smith & Son (out of Belcamp), a 150-year-old cask that sits on a table and in the photo is sitting on a table that would have held large barrels (from Europe and over 200 years old).

Did you notice the clothes washer? It’s a 1950s electro mite portable, electric, washing machine. The tub holds 4 gallons of water and sits in the base that is a motor that agitates the tub, washing the clothes. That’s it – add a bit of detergent to the water, add clothes, plug in and agitate – easier than a washboard! 

This is an amazing set of implements and tools. 

Stop in and check these out. We’ve plenty of ‘unique’ for you to browse. Yep, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

 

Mirror – Mirror

Reflections – real or perceived?

We all recognize “Mirror, mirror on the wall…”

But have you really stepped into Bahoukas Antique Mall and looked for all the mirrors we have? The variety and sizes are many. From a small child’s music box mirror to a huge, full-length mirror, and everything in between!  The shapes are oval and rectangle. They’re found on the wall or atop a beautiful chest of drawers. You really have to stop by and check them out. I’m sure we’ve not found them all. And yes, as always, we’ll be watchin’ for ya!

Welcome to August! Enjoy the final weeks of summer!

Father-in-Law Day

Always July 30th

Father-In-Law Day honors your loving, funny, and cheerful father-in-law. Okay, so perhaps sometimes he is a little grumpy and intimidating. Regardless of his personality and charms, this day is dedicated to your spouse’s Dad. And, he certainly deserves a little recognition.

Good ways to celebrate this day are to send him a card, spend a little time with him, or give him his favorite snack.

Important note: If you gave your Father-In-Law recognition on Father’s Day,  it’s okay to give him a little recognition and a show of appreciation today, too.

collectible Baltimore Colts thermos carrier and a B-more Orioles Bird at Bahoukas

To help you celebrate Father-in-Law Day, we thought we’d round up a couple items that may be of interest. Of course, we have plenty of other interesting ideas if our 9,000+ sq ft or retail space. 

beautiful pocket watches and wristwatches make a great gift for Father-in-Law Day - available at Bahoukas Antiques in Havre de Grace, MD

It’s also International Friendship Day!

The world is filled with too much hatred, too much fighting and too much mistrust of others. The International Day of Friendship is certainly an opportunity to stop, and to reverse, these worldwide problems.

According to the United Nations, the official sponsor of this special day, the International Day of Friendship is day set aside to promote friendship among peoples, cultures and countries. Today is a time to encourage efforts towards peace, and to build bridges among different people. It is a day of respect for others, and a day to celebrate diversity.

According to the United Nations, on this day people, groups and governments should hold events and activities to promote mutual understanding and reconciliation.

On an individual level, use this day to promote friendship in big and small ways. You can begin by “extending an olive branch” to a sibling or a family member, a neighbor, or an old friend who we’ve had a falling out with. If we all try just a little the world will be a friendlier, more peaceful place.

This was a bit trickier to find in our store. But when we thought of friendship, these pieces came to mind:

E.T. and Eilliott glass, Donald and Daisy Duck glass, Small bust of JFK, Jack and Jill book - collectibles at Bahoukas in Havre de Grace

The origin of International Day of Friendship has roots as far back as 1919 in the United States. The country of Paraguay  first celebrate this day on an national level on July 30, 1958.  Other countries with early celebrations include: several countries in South America, Bangladesh, India, and Malaysia. Different countries celebrated this day on varying dates in July, August and April.

In 2011, the United Nations declared this an official international day, to be celebrated annually on July 30th.

Finally, this month we celebrate MUTT’S DAY!

Mutts deserve their day in the spotlight, as much as a pure breed. If you own a mutt, or you are a mutt (reading this), then you know this day is for you.

By definition a mutt, sometimes called a “Half-breed”, is a dog that is of mixed breed.  They come from two to several breeds. Purebred owners, and sometimes the public in general, view them as lesser in many ways. Mutt owners know better. They value the diversity and uniqueness of their mutts. Sure, a mutt doesn’t carry the expensive price tag that a purebred with papers has on its head. To the mutt owner, however, the mutt is invaluable. In addition, mutts don’t walk around needing to prove anything. You won’t see them strutting around any dog shows trying to prove they are the best.

To all mutts and and mutt owners, we hope you thoroughly enjoy Mutt’s Day. Spend the day relaxing and doing all the things you and your dog like to do. Do so with both of your chins held high. For your mutt is worth a million bucks!

a variety of ideas to celebrate Mutt's Day - all this fun at Bahoukas Antique Mall

We have soapy’s and PEZ, a figurine and pull toy, and a large figurine to celebrate Mutt’s Day! 

This rounds out our month of unique and interesting holidays that are fun to celebrate. We enjoyed the search for both the holiday and the gift ideas! Of course, no one needs one of our silly reasons to stop in and check us out. It’s just 9,000 sq ft of treasure hunting. So stop in soon. Yes, we definitely will be watchin’ for ya!

Please note: all the quotes above are from Holiday Insights. 

Cowboys and Tigers and more…oh my

National Day of the Cowboy

John Wayne collectible plates and more at Bahoukas to Celebrate National Day of the Cowboy

Holiday Insights gives us a wonderful definition of National Day of the Cowboy celebrated on the 4th Saturday of July:

National Day of the Cowboy was created in 2005 to preserve the role and contributions cowboys and cowgirls made to the western heritage and history of our country. Every year on this day, the NDOC gives recognition awards to individuals, organizations and projects that contribute to the preservation of both pioneer history, and the promotion of cowboy culture.

Shortly after the Civil War, cowboys and cowgirls began to appear in America’s heartland and the wild west. They were largely ranchers and ranch hands, raising cattle, horses and other animals. Cowboys herded them across the plains to feed the animals, and ultimately to slaughterhouses to feed a growing American population.

It was a wild and often lawless time. In the absence of the rule of law, Cowboys developed their own code to live by, known as the “Cowboy Code of Conduct” or the “Cowboy Code of Ethics”. They were simple and logical rules of behavior. The rules could readily apply at any time, even today.

Consider this wonderful Cowboy Code of Honor:

  • Live each day with honesty and courage.
  • Take pride in your work. Always do your best.
  • Stay curious. Study hard and learn all you can.
  • Do what has to be done and finish what you start.
  • Be tough, but fair.
  • When you make a promise, keep it.
  • Be clean in thought, word, deed, and dress.
  • Practice tolerance and understanding of others.
  • Be willing to stand up for what is right.
  • Be an excellent steward of the land and its animals

greatcowboy movie photos used on movie theater billboards at Bahoukas!

Wondering how you might celebrate this special day? Consider these ideas:

      Go to a rodeo, where cowboy skills are on display
       Buy a cowboy hat
       Dress up like a cowboy
       Read a book or article on cowboy and cowgirl history
       Watch a Western movie that features cowboys.

 

 

Then Celebrate International Tiger Day

Collectible Tiger glasses to celebrate International Tiger Day available at Bahoukas

International Tiger Day celebrates tigers, the largest cat on the planet. It is arguably the most beautiful and majestic cat on the planet, too. Love ’em, hate ’em, or just plain scared of them, one must admit that they are indeed a beautiful animal.

At an International Tiger Summit in Saint Petersburg, Russia, the plight of wild tigers came into full focus.  Over the last century, the world-wild tiger population dropped 97% (not including tigers in zoos). With only an estimated 3,000 tigers left in the wild, they are on the brink of extinction. The drastic population loss was due to several factors, among them was hunting, poaching, and loss of habitat.  This international groups sought raise awareness to the plight of the tiger, and to protect and expand their habitat. Their goals and endeavors, are an international effort.  from Holiday Insights

Tiger by the Tail - a give away from Esso to hook to your antenna - a great collectible from Bahoukas

 There are many things you can do to celebrate this special day. Here are a few ideas:

  Read up about tigers and their loss of population.
  Show your support of groups working to raise awareness and improve their habitat.
  Go the the zoo and see these majestic creatures.
  Make plans to go on a safari, to see tigers in their native habitat.

 

Celebrate these special days with us by dropping into Bahoukas Antique Mall and Beer MuZeum to enjoy the treasure hunt!

We’ll be watchin’ for ya!