Any nurses on your holiday gift list?

Or possibly other medical personnel who collect antiquities of their trade. Or maybe you just like to have unique items, we call ‘conversation pieces,’ on your table or shelf.

… an “invalid feeder” which was often found in many homes late in the 19th into the 20th century. They were used to facilitate the feeding of invalids. A liquid or semi-soft food was placed in the feeder and the spout was then placed in the person’s mouth. In the movie “The English Patient” the use of a feeder was shown in a brief flashback.

from AAHN website

Also known as Pap Boats, Invalid Feeders were used throughout the 19th century and well into the 20th century to aid in the feeding of patients that were too weak to feed themselves and in feeding infants. The use of invalid and infant feeders was much more popular in Europe than in the United States. A mixture called Pap, consisting of flour, bread, and water was mixed together to creat a gruel that was fed to the patient. Typically, the feeders were made of ceramic and colorfully decorated, with some shaped like animals for feeding children. Some early Invalid Feeders were made out of sterling silver or clear glass.

from Edward Hand Medical Museum

Next time you’re watching a movie from Victorian Era through WWI, keep an eye out for a nurse using an invalid feeder. It adds a little fun to your movie night.

Bahoukas received a beautiful collection of invalid feeders. Some are very plain, others are quite exquisite. One or two of them look like they were especially made for children.

Stop in and take a peek. Yep, we’ll be watching for ya!